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USS(5)			      AFS File Reference			USS(5)

NAME
       uss - Provides instructions for the uss add command (deprecated)

CAUTIONS
       The uss command suite is	currently designed for cells using the
       obsolete	Authentication Server, and therefore is	primarily useful for
       sites that have not yet migrated	to a Kerberos version 5	KDC. The
       Authentication Server and supporting commands will be removed in	a
       future version of OpenAFS, which	may include uss	unless someone who
       finds it	useful converts	it to work with	a Kerberos version 5 KDC.

DESCRIPTION
       The uss template	file defines the components of an AFS user account
       that the	uss add	command	(or add	instruction in a uss bulk input	file)
       creates.	Use the	-template argument to the uss add or uss bulk command
       to identify the template	file.

   Summary of Template File Instructions
       The template file can include the following instructions, each on its
       own line. A more	detailed description of	each instruction's syntax
       follows this list.

       A   Imposes restrictions	on user	passwords and authentication attempts.

       D   Creates a directory.

       E   Creates a single-line file.

       F   Creates a file by copying a prototype.

       G   Defines a directory that is one of a	set of parent directories into
	   which the uss command interpreter evenly distributes	newly created
	   home	directories.

       L   Creates a hard link.

       S   Creates a symbolic link.

       V   Creates a volume, mounts it in the file space and sets the ACL on
	   the mount point.

       X   Executes a command.

       If the template file is empty (zero-length), the	uss add	command	or
       "add" instruction in a bulk input file only creates an entry in the
       Protection and Authentication Databases,	naming them according to the
       name specified with the uss add command's -user argument, or in the
       bulk input file "add" instruction's username field.

   The A Instruction for Setting the Default Treatment of Volumes
       The "A" instruction in a	uss template file enhances cell	security by
       imposing	the following restrictions on users' password choice and
       authentication attempts.	For further information	on these limits, see
       the OpenAFS Administration Guide	and the	kas setfields reference	page.

       o   Limiting the	user's password	lifetime. When the lifetime expires,
	   the user can	no longer authenticate using that password, and	must
	   change it.

       o   Prohibiting the reuse of the	user's 20 most recently	used
	   passwords.

       o   Limiting the	number of consecutive times that a user	can provide an
	   incorrect password during authentication, and for how long the
	   Authentication Server refuses further authentication	attempts after
	   the limit is	exceeded (referred to as an account lockout). For
	   regular user	accounts in most cells,	the recommended	limit is nine
	   and lockout time is 25 minutes.

       The instruction has the following syntax:

	  A <username> <lifetime> <reuse> <failures> <locktime>

       where

       A   Indicates a security-enhancing instruction. It must be a capital
	   letter.

       <username>
	   Names the Authentication Database entry on which to impose security
	   restrictions. Specify the value $USER to read in the	username from
	   the uss add command's -user argument, or from the username field of
	   an "add" instruction	in a bulk input	file.

       <lifetime>
	   Sets	the number of days after the user's password is	changed	that
	   it remains valid. When the password becomes invalid (expires), the
	   user	is unable to authenticate, but has 30 more days	in which to
	   issue the kpasswd command to	change the password (after that, only
	   an administrator can	change it).

	   Specify an integer from the range 1 through 254 to specify the
	   number of days until	expiration, the	value 0	to indicate that the
	   password never expires, or the value	$PWEXPIRES to read in the
	   number of days from the uss add or uss bulk command's -pwexpires
	   argument. If	the "A"	instruction does not appear in the template
	   file, the default is	for the	user's password	never to expire.

       <reuse>
	   Determines whether or not the user can change his or	her password
	   (using the kpasswd or kas setpassword command) to one that is
	   similar to any of the last twenty passwords.	The acceptable values
	   are "reuse" to allow	reuse and "noreuse" to prohibit	it.  If	the
	   "A" instruction does	not appear in the template file, the default
	   is to allow password	reuse.

       <failures>
	   Sets	the number of consecutive times	the user can provide an
	   incorrect password during authentication (using the klog command or
	   a login utility that	grants AFS tokens). When the user exceeds the
	   limit, the Authentication Server rejects further authentication
	   attempts for	the amount of time specified in	the <locktime> field.

	   Specify an integer from the range 1 through 254 to specify the
	   number of failures permitted, or the	value 0	to indicate that there
	   is no limit to the number of	unsuccessful attempts.	If the "A"
	   instruction does not	appear in the template file, the default is to
	   allow an unlimited number of	failures.

       <locktime>
	   Specifies how long the Authentication Server	refuses	authentication
	   attempts from a user	who has	exceeded the failure limit set in the
	   <failures> field.

	   Specify a number of hours and minutes (hh:mm) or minutes only (mm),
	   from	the range 01 (one minute) through "36:00" (36 hours). The
	   Authentication Server automatically reduces any larger value	to
	   "36:00" and also rounds up any non-zero value to the	next higher
	   multiple of 8.5 minutes. A value of 0 (zero)	sets an	infinite
	   lockout time; an administrator must always issue the	kas unlock
	   command to unlock the account.

   The D Instruction for Creating a Directory
       The "D" instruction in a	uss template file creates a directory. Its
       intended	use is to create a subdirectory	in the user home directory
       created by the "V" instruction in the template file.

       Any number of "D" instructions can appear in the	template file. If any
       variables in the	instruction take their values from the "V" instruction
       (notably, the $MTPT variable), the instruction must follow the "V"
       instruction in the file.

       Although	it is possible to use the "D" instruction to create a
       directory on the	local disk of the machine where	the uss	command	is
       issued, it is not recommended. The preferred method for automated
       creation	of directories on a local disk is the package program. Two
       complications arise if the <pathname> field refers to a local disk
       directory:

       o   The uss command prints a warning message because it cannot
	   associate an	access control list (ACL) with a local disk directory.
	   It creates the directory nonetheless, and some syntactically
	   correct value must appear in	the instruction's <ACL>	field.

       o   To designate	any user other than the	issuer as the new directory's
	   owner, the issuer must log onto the machine as the local superuser
	   "root". For local disk directories, only the	local superuser	"root"
	   is allowed to issue the UNIX	chown command that the uss command
	   interpreter invokes to change the owner from	the default value (the
	   directory's creator,	which in this case is the issuer of the	uss
	   command). The issuer	must then also use the -admin argument to the
	   uss add or uss bulk command to authenticate as a privileged AFS
	   administrator, which	is required for	creating the Authentication
	   Database and	Protection Database entries that the uss command
	   interpreter always creates for a new	account.

       The instruction has the following syntax:

	  D <pathname> <mode> <owner> <ACL>

       where

       D   Indicates a directory creation instruction. It must be a capital
	   letter.

       <pathname>
	   Specifies the directory's full pathname. It can include variables.

	   Specify the read/write path to the directory, to avoid the failure
	   that	results	from attempting	to create a new	directory in a read-
	   only	volume.	By convention, the read/write path is indicated	by
	   placing a period before the cell name at the	pathname's second
	   level (for example, /afs/.abc.com). For further discussion of the
	   concept of read/write and read-only paths through the filespace,
	   see the reference page for the fs mkmount command.

       <mode>
	   Sets	the directory's	UNIX mode bits.	Acceptable values are the
	   standard three- or four-digit numbers corresponding to combinations
	   of permissions. Examples: 755 corresponds to	"rwxr-xr-x", and 644
	   to "rw-r--r--". The first (owner) "x" bit must be turned on to
	   enable access to a directory.

       <owner>
	   Specifies the username or UNIX user ID (UID)	of the user to be
	   designated the directory's owner in the output from the UNIX	"ls
	   -ld"	command. If the	directory resides in AFS, place	the $UID
	   variable in this field. If the directory resides on the local disk,
	   this	field must be the username or UID of the uss command's issuer,
	   unless the issuer is	logged in as the local superuser "root".

       <ACL>
	   Sets	the ACL	on the new directory. It must appear even if the new
	   directory resides on	the local disk rather than in AFS, but is
	   ignored in that case. Provide one or	more paired values, each pair
	   consisting of an AFS	username or group name and the desired
	   permissions,	in that	order.	Separate the two parts of the pair,
	   and each pair, with a space.	The fs setacl reference	page describes
	   the available permissions.

	   For an AFS directory, grant all permissions to the directory's
	   owner at least. Usually that	is the new user, in which case the
	   appropriate value is	"$USER all".

	   It is not possible to grant any permissions to the issuer of	the
	   uss command.	As the last step in account creation, the uss command
	   interpreter automatically deletes that person from any ACLs set
	   during the creation process.

   The E Instruction for Creating a Single-line	File
       The "E" instruction in a	uss template file creates a file by echoing a
       specified character string into it. Its intended	use is to create files
       in the user home	directory created by the "V" instruction in the
       template	file, or in a subdirectory created by a	"D" instruction.

       Any number of "E" instructions can appear in the	template file. If the
       file resides in a directory created by a	"D" instruction, the "E"
       instruction must	follow the "D" instruction in the file.

       The "E" and "F" instructions have complementary advantages. The
       character string	echoed into the	file by	an "E" instruction can be
       customized for each user, because it can	include	the standard variables
       for which the uss command interpreter substitutes the values specified
       by arguments to the uss add command or fields in	a bulk input file add
       instruction. In contrast, a file	created	using the "F" instruction
       cannot include variables	and so has the same content for	all users.
       However,	a file created by an "E" instruction can be a single line
       only, because no	carriage returns (newline characters) are allowed in
       the character string.

       Although	it is possible to use the "E" instruction to create a file on
       the local disk of the machine where the uss command is issued, it is
       not recommended.	The preferred method for automated creation of files
       on a local disk is the package program.	The main complication is that
       designating any user other than the issuer as the new file's owner
       requires	logging	onto the machine as the	local superuser	"root".	For
       local disk files, only the local	superuser "root" is allowed to issue
       the UNIX	chown command that the uss command interpreter invokes to
       change the owner	from the default value (the file's creator, which in
       this case is the	issuer of the uss command). The	issuer must then also
       use the -admin argument to the uss add or uss bulk command to
       authenticate as a privileged AFS	administrator, which is	required for
       creating	the Authentication Database and	Protection Database entries
       that the	uss command interpreter	always creates for a new account.

       The instruction has the following syntax:

	  E <pathname> <mode> <owner> "<contents>"

       where

       E   Indicates a file creation instruction. It must be a capital letter.

       <pathname>
	   Specifies the file's	full pathname. It can include variables.

	   Specify the read/write path to the file, to avoid the failure that
	   results from	attempting to create a new file	in a read-only volume.
	   By convention, the read/write path is indicated by placing a	period
	   before the cell name	at the pathname's second level (for example,
	   /afs/.abc.com). For further discussion of the concept of read/write
	   and read-only paths through the filespace, see the reference	page
	   for the fs mkmount command.

       <mode>
	   Sets	the file's UNIX	mode bits. Acceptable values are the standard
	   three- or four-digit	numbers	corresponding to combinations of
	   permissions.	Examples: 755 corresponds to "rwxr-xr-x", and 644 to
	   "rw-r--r--".

       <owner>
	   Specifies the username or UNIX user ID (UID)	of the user to be
	   designated the file's owner in the output from the UNIX "ls -l"
	   command. If the file	resides	in AFS,	place the $UID variable	in
	   this	field. If the file resides on the local	disk, specify the
	   username or UID of the uss command's	issuer;	otherwise, the account
	   creation operation halts immediately.

       <contents>
	   Specifies the one-line character string to write into the new file.
	   Surround it with double quotes if it	contains one or	more spaces.
	   It cannot contain the newline character, but	can contain any	of the
	   standard variables, which the command interpreter resolves as it
	   creates the file.

   The F Instruction for Creating a File from a	Prototype
       The "F" instruction in a	uss template file creates a file by copying
       the contents of an existing file	(the <prototype>) into it. Its
       intended	use is to create files in the user home	directory created by
       the "V" instruction in the template file, or in a subdirectory created
       by a "D"	instruction.

       Any number of "F" instructions can appear in the	template file. If the
       file resides in a directory created by a	"D" instruction, the "F"
       instruction must	follow the "D" instruction in the file.

       The "E" and "F" instructions have complementary advantages. A file
       created using the "F" instruction has the same content for all users,
       whereas a file created by an "E"	instruction can	be customized for each
       user if it includes variables.  However,	a file created by an "E"
       instruction can be a single line	only, whereas the prototype file
       copied by an "F"	instruction can	be any length.

       Although	it is possible to use the "F" instruction to create a file on
       the local disk of the machine where the uss command is issued, it is
       not recommended.	The preferred method for automated creation of files
       on a local disk is the package program.	The main complication is that
       designating any user other than the issuer as the new file's owner
       requires	logging	onto the machine as the	local superuser	"root".	For
       local disk files, only the local	superuser "root" is allowed to issue
       the UNIX	chown command that the uss command interpreter invokes to
       change the owner	from the default value (the file's creator, which in
       this case is the	issuer of the uss command). The	issuer must then also
       use the -admin argument to the uss add or uss bulk command to
       authenticate as a privileged AFS	administrator, which is	required for
       creating	the Authentication Database and	Protection Database entries
       that the	uss command interpreter	always creates for a new account.

       The instruction has the following syntax:

	  F <pathname> <mode> <owner> <prototype_file>

       where

       F   Indicates a file creation instruction. It must be a capital letter.

       <pathname>
	   Specifies the full pathname of the file to create, including	the
	   filename. It	can include variables.

	   Specify the read/write path to the file, to avoid the failure that
	   results from	attempting to create a new file	in a read-only volume.
	   By convention, the read/write path is indicated by placing a	period
	   before the cell name	at the pathname's second level (for example,
	   /afs/.abc.com). For further discussion of the concept of read/write
	   and read-only paths through the filespace, see the reference	page
	   for the fs mkmount command.

       <mode>
	   Sets	the file's UNIX	mode bits. Acceptable values are the standard
	   three- or four-digit	numbers	corresponding to combinations of
	   permissions.	Examples: 755 corresponds to "rwxr-xr-x", and 644 to
	   "rw-r--r--".

       <owner>
	   Specifies the username or UNIX user ID (UID)	of the user to be
	   designated the file's owner in the output from the UNIX "ls -l"
	   command. If the file	resides	in AFS,	place the $UID variable	in
	   this	field. If the file resides on the local	disk, specify the
	   username or UID of the uss command's	issuer;	otherwise, the account
	   creation operation halts immediately.

       <prototype_file>
	   Names the AFS or local disk directory that houses the prototype
	   file	to copy. The prototype file's name must	match the final
	   element in the <pathname> field.

   The G Instruction for Even Distribution of Home Directories
       The "G" instruction in a	uss template file creates a directory as one
       of the set of directories from which the	uss command interpreter
       selects when choosing a new user	home directory's parent	directory.
       More specifically, when the $AUTO variable appears in the <mount_point>
       field of	a "V" instruction, the command interpreter substitutes for it
       the directory defined by	a "G" instruction that currently has the
       fewest entries.

       The instruction's intended use is to distribute user accounts evenly
       among several directories, rather than using directories	that reflect
       divisions such as departmental affiliation. Distributing	home
       directories in this fashion is useful mainly in very large cells	where
       storing all user	home directories under a single	parent directory
       potentially slows directory lookup, or where a workplace-based division
       results in unevenly sized directories such that some users consistently
       experience slower directory lookup than others. See the chapter on uss
       in the OpenAFS Administration Guide for more information.

       Any number of "G" instructions can appear in the	template file. If the
       "V" instruction includes	the $AUTO variable, it must appear after all
       of the "G" instructions in the file.

       The instruction has the following syntax:

	  G <directory>

       where

       G   Indicates an	instruction that creates a directory to	be considered
	   as a	value for the $AUTO variable. It must be a capital letter.

       <directory>
	   Specifies the directory's name as either a complete pathname	or
	   only	the directory name. The	choice determines the appropriate
	   format for the <mount_point>	field of a "V" instruction, as
	   discussed in	the following example.

	   Specify the read/write path to the directory, to avoid the failure
	   that	results	from attempting	to create a new	mount point in a read-
	   only	volume when the	$AUTO variable is used in a "V"	instruction's
	   <mount_point> field.	By convention, the read/write path is
	   indicated by	placing	a period before	the cell name at the
	   pathname's second level (for	example, /afs/.abc.com). For further
	   discussion of the concept of	read/write and read-only paths through
	   the filespace, see the reference page for the fs mkmount command.

   The L and S Instructions for	Creating a Link
       The "L" instruction in a	uss template file creates a hard link between
       two files, as achieved by the standard UNIX ln command. The "S"
       instruction creates a symbolic link between two files, as achieved by
       the standard UNIX "ln -s" command. A full explanation of	links is
       beyond the scope	of this	document, but the basic	effect is to create a
       second name for an existing file, enabling access via either name.
       Creating	a link does not	create a second	copy of	the file.

       AFS allows hard links only if the linked	files reside in	the same
       directory, because it becomes difficult to determine which access
       control list (ACL) applies to the file if the two copies	reside in
       directories with	different ACLs.	AFS allows symbolic links between two
       files that reside in different directories, or even different volumes.
       The File	Server uses the	ACL associated with the	actual file rather
       than the	link.

       Any number of "L" and "S" instructions can appear in the	template file.
       If the existing file or link is to reside in a directory	created	by a
       "D" instruction,	or if the existing file	was created by an "E" or "F"
       instruction, the	"L" or "S" instruction must follow the "D", "E", or
       "F" instruction.

       The instructions	share the following syntax:

	  L <existing_file> <link>
	  S <existing_file> <link>

       where

       L   Indicates a hard link creation instruction. It must be a capital
	   letter.

       S   Indicates a symbolic	link creation instruction. It must be a
	   capital letter.

       <existing_file>
	   Specifies the complete pathname of the existing file.

       <link>
	   Specifies the complete pathname of the second name for the file.

	   Specify the read/write path to the link, to avoid the failure that
	   results from	attempting to create a new link	in a read-only volume.
	   By convention, the read/write path is indicated by placing a	period
	   before the cell name	at the pathname's second level (for example,
	   /afs/.abc.com). For further discussion of the concept of read/write
	   and read-only paths through the filespace, see the reference	page
	   for the fs mkmount command.

   The V Instruction for Creating and Mounting a Volume
       The "V" instruction in a	uss template file creates a volume on a
       specified file server machine and partition and creates an entry	for it
       in the Volume Location Database (VLDB). It mounts the volume at a
       location	in the AFS file	space that becomes the user's home directory,
       then designates the directory's owner and sets its access control list
       (ACL).

       Only one	"V" instruction	can appear in the template file, and one must
       appear if the template file contains any	instructions at	all (is	not
       empty). All other instructions are optional, except that	the template
       must include "G"	instructions if	the $AUTO variable appears in it. (The
       "V" instruction is not necessarily the first line in the	template. If
       the template includes the $AUTO variable, then the "G" instructions
       which provide values for	the variable must precede it in	the file.)

       The instruction has the following syntax:

	  V <vname> <server> <partition> <quota> <mount_point> <owner> <ACL>

       where

       V   Indicates a volume creation instruction. It must be a capital
	   letter.

       <name>
	   Specifies the volume's name.	To follow the convention for AFS user
	   volume names, specify the value "user.$USER".  Provide a value for
	   the $USER variable via the uss add command's	-user argument or the
	   <username> field in the bulk	input file add instruction.

       <server>
	   Names the file server machine on which to create the	new user's
	   volume. It is best to provide the fully-qualified hostname (for
	   example, "fs1.abc.com"), but	an abbreviated form is acceptable
	   provided that the cell's naming service is available	to resolve it
	   at the time the volume is created. To read in the value from	the
	   uss add command's -server argument, specify the value $SERVER.

       <partition>
	   Specifies the partition on which to create the user's volume; it
	   must	be on the file server machine named in the <server> field.
	   Identify the	partition by its complete name (for example, /vicepa)
	   or use or use one of	the following abbreviations.

	      /vicepa	  =	vicepa	    =	   a	  =	 0
	      /vicepb	  =	vicepb	    =	   b	  =	 1

	   After /vicepz (for which the	index is 25) comes

	      /vicepaa	  =	vicepaa	    =	   aa	  =	 26
	      /vicepab	  =	vicepab	    =	   ab	  =	 27

	   and so on through

	      /vicepiv	  =	vicepiv	    =	   iv	  =	 255

	   To read in the value	from the uss add command's -partition
	   argument, specify the value $PART.

       <quota>
	   Sets	the maximum number of kilobyte blocks the volume can occupy on
	   the file server machine's disk. Specify an integer constant if all
	   volumes have	the same quota (1024 equals a megabyte), or use	one of
	   the number variables	($1 through $9)	to assign different values to
	   different volumes.

       <mount_point>
	   Creates a mount point for the volume, which serves as the volume's
	   root	directory. Include the $USER variable as part of the pathname
	   to follow the convention that user home directory names include the
	   username.

	   Specify the read/write path to the mount point, to avoid the
	   failure that	results	from attempting	to create a new	mount point in
	   a read-only volume. By convention, the read/write path is indicated
	   by placing a	period before the cell name at the pathname's second
	   level (for example, /afs/.abc.com). If the $AUTO variable appears
	   in this field, the directories named	by each	"G" instruction
	   possibly already indicate the read/write path. For further
	   discussion of the concept of	read/write and read-only paths through
	   the filespace, see the reference page for the fs mkmount command.

       <owner>
	   Specifies the username or UNIX user ID (UID)	of the user to be
	   designated the mount	point's	owner in the output from the UNIX "ls
	   -ld"	command. To follow the convention for home directory
	   ownership, place the	value $UID in this field.

       <ACL>
	   Sets	the ACL	on the new directory. Provide one or more paired
	   values, each	pair consisting	of an AFS username or group name and
	   the desired permissions, in that order. Separate the	two parts of
	   the pair, and each pair, with a space. The fs setacl	reference page
	   describes the available permissions.

	   Grant all permissions to the	new user at least. The appropriate
	   value is "$USER all".

	   AFS automatically grants the	system:administrators group all
	   permissions as well.	It is not possible to grant any	permissions to
	   the issuer of the uss command. As the last step in account
	   creation, the uss command interpreter automatically deletes that
	   user	from any ACLs set during the creation process.

   The X Instruction for Running a Command
       The "X" instruction in a	uss template file runs the indicated command,
       which can be a standard UNIX or AFS command. It can include any
       variables from the template file, which the uss command interpreter
       resolves	before passing the command on to the appropriate other command
       interpreter. It must be a single	line only, however (cannot contain
       carriage	returns	or newline characters).

       Any number of "X" instructions can appear in the	template file. If an
       instruction manipulates an element created by another instruction, it
       must follow that	instruction in the file.

       The instruction has the following syntax:

	  X "<command>"

       where

       X   Indicates a command execution instruction. It must be a capital
	   letter.

       <command>
	   Specifies the command to run. Surround it with double quotes	as
	   shown if it contains	one or more spaces. It can contain any
	   variables from the template file, but not newline characters.

EXAMPLES
       The following example A instruction sets	a password lifetime of 254
       days, prohibits password	reuse, limits the number of consecutive	failed
       authentication attempts to nine and sets	the corresponding locktime to
       25:30 minutes (which is a multiple of 8.5 minutes). The username	is
       read in from the	-user argument to the uss add command or from the
       username	field in each "add" instruction	in a bulk input	file.

	  A $USER 254 noreuse 9	25:30

       The following example "D" instruction creates a directory called	public
       in a new	user's home directory, designates the user as the directory's
       owner, and grants him or	her all	ACL permissions.

	  D $MTPT/public 0755 $UID $USER all

       The following example "E" instruction creates a file in the current
       working directory called	username.etcp. The contents are	an entry
       suitable	for incorporating into the cell's global /etc/password file.

	  E  $USER.etcp	 0644 root "$USER:X:$UID:10:$NAME:$MTPT:/bin/csh"

       The following example "F" instruction, appropriate for the ABC
       Corporation cell, copies	a prototype .login file	into the user's	home
       directory.

	  F $MTPT/.login 0644 $UID /afs/abc.com/common/uss/skel/.login

       In the following	example, the State University cell's administrators
       have decided to distribute user home directories	evenly into three
       directories. They define	three "G" instructions:

	  G usr1
	  G usr2
	  G usr3

       and then	put the	following value	in the <mount_point> field of the "V"
       instruction:

	  /afs/stateu.edu/$AUTO/$USER

       Alternatively, if they include the entire directory pathname in the "G"
       instruction:

	  G /afs/stateu.edu/usr1
	  G /afs/stateu.edu/usr2
	  G /afs/stateu.edu/usr3

       then the	<mount_point> field of the "V" instruction specifies only the
       following:

	  $AUTO/$USER

       The following example "L" instruction creates a hard link between the
       files mail and mbox in the user's home directory.

	  L $MTPT/mbox $MTPT/mail

       The following example "S" instruction, appropriate for the ABC
       Corporation cell, links the file	Mail/outgoing in the user's home
       directory to the	file /afs/abc.com/common/mail/outgoing.

	  S /afs/abc.com/common/mail/outgoing $MTPT/Mail/outgoing

       The following example "V" instruction creates a volume called
       "user.username" on the /vicepa partition	of the specified file server
       machine,	assigning it a quota of	3000 kilobyte blocks. The mount	point
       is under	/afs/abc.com/usr and matches the username (the value of	the
       $USER variable).	The user owns the home directory and has all access
       rights to it. The instruction appears on	two lines only for legibility;
       it must appear on a single line in the template file.

	  V user.$USER $SERVER.abc.com /vicepa 3000 \
		  /afs/abc.com/usr/$USER $UID $USER all

       The following example "X" instruction mounts the	backup version of the
       user's volume at	the OldFiles subdirectory.

	  X "fs	mkm /afs/abc.com/usr/$USER/OldFiles   user.$USER.backup"

SEE ALSO
       uss_bulk(5), fs_mkmount(1), uss_add(8)

COPYRIGHT
       IBM Corporation 2000. <http://www.ibm.com/> All Rights Reserved.

       This documentation is covered by	the IBM	Public License Version 1.0.
       It was converted	from HTML to POD by software written by	Chas Williams
       and Russ	Allbery, based on work by Alf Wachsmann	and Elizabeth Cassell.

OpenAFS				  2016-12-14				USS(5)

NAME | CAUTIONS | DESCRIPTION | EXAMPLES | SEE ALSO | COPYRIGHT

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