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UNILOOK(1)	      User Contributed Perl Documentation	    UNILOOK(1)

NAME
       word - display words starting or	matching a string or pattern

SYNOPSIS
       word [options] [string |	pattern]

       Given a string, show all	words starting with that string	(look mode).
       Given a pattern,	show all lines matching	that pattern (grep mode).

       An argument with	non-alphabetic characters is always a pattern.	Force
       grep mode with --grep=pattern or	by starting the	pattern	with a slash,
       which will be ignored.

       Use --man to get	the full manpage.

DESCRIPTION
       Search a	large list of words in one of two modes.  In look mode,	only
       words starting with the given string are	displayed.  This mode runs
       very quickly.  Only purely alphabetic strings are allowed.  The system
       look(1) program is co-opted into	helping.

       In grep mode, any entries matching the pattern are shown.  This takes
       much longer to run, because the entire 26 megabyte file must be grepped
       through.	 The pattern is	not a grep(1) pattern, but rather a perl(1)
       pattern.	 You may use Unicode named characters, plus several custom
       aliases,	in your	pattern.

EXAMPLES
       Look up terms starting with "cat":

	   % word cat

       The same, but bump verbose display level	to see parts of	speech:

	   % word -v cat

       Look at only verbs starting with	cat:

	   % word -pv cat

       Look at all "cat" entries, with verbose set high:

	   % word -A cat

       Look for	all (irregular)	plurals	that start with	"ex":

	   % word -ppl ex

       Look for	obsolete prefixes that start with "s":

	   % word -o -ppref s

       Grep terms with "cat" anywhere at all:

	   % word --grep cat
	   % word /cat

       Grep terms containing "cat" or "cats" surrounded	by word	boundaries:

	   % word '\bcats?\b'

       Grep terms with the Unicode "Mark" property:

	   % word '\pM'

       Grep all	plurals	ending in "-ata":

	   % word -A -ppl 'ata\b'

       Grep terms with the Unicode "Dash" property:

	   % word '\p{Dash}'

       Grep for	an "e" with an acute accent:

	   % word '\N{eacute}'

       Grep for	any acute accents no matter the	letter:

	   % word '\N{acute}'

       Grep for	terms containing an "a", "o", "u" in any case, followed	by a
       diaeresis:

	   % word '(?i)[oau]\N{dier}'

OPTIONS
       Display options are:

	   --verbose / -v      use up to three times for more verbosity

	       level 0 is just the word, like look
	       level 1 includes	parts of speech
	       level 2 also includes assorted markings
	       level 3 is the entire original entry

	   --nopager	       never call the pager

       Part of speech filtering	options	are:

	   --pos /   -p	POS    only entries matching all POS shown
	   --nopos / -P	POS    no   entries matching any POS shown

	   POS is a comma-separated list of parts of speech like
	   n/noun, v/verb, a/adjective,	adv/adverb, pro/pronoun,
	   and pl/plural.

       Type of entry filtering options are:

	   --headwords	    -h	show headwords only
	   --everything	    -a	include	all types of entry
	   --all-verbose    -A	all entries, plus sets verbose to 2

       Some entries contain markings telling what kind it is.  Include or
       exclude such entries using:

	   --normal	    -n	normal entries (on by default)
	   --foreign	    -f	unassimilated entries (on by default)

	   --obsolete	    -o	obsolete entries (off by default)
	   --catachrestic   -e	catechrestic entries (off by default)
	   --illustrations  -i	illustrative examples (off by default)
	   --crossref	    -x	crossrefs w/old	spellings (off by default)

       The previous six	entry types can	be excluded using the corresponding
       --noXXX long option or the capitalized short option; e.g., --noforeign
       is equivalent to	-F.

       Other options:

	   --version	       print version info and exit
	   --help	       this help page
	   --man	       the full	manpage
	   --debug	       internal	debugging

	   --fuzzy	    -z use agrep(1) fuzzy matching in "best mode"
	   --all-fuzzy	    -Z like -zavv

PATTERN	SHORTCUTS
       Besides all normal Perl pattern syntax, an extensive set	of named
       characters is provide for nmemonic convenience so you don't have	to
       write numeric code points like "\x{3b2}"	for non-ASCII characters.

       o   The full Unicode name, like "\N{EN DASH}" or	"\N{LATIN SMALL	LETTER
	   THORN}", or Latin or	Greek letter names, like "\N{thorn}" or
	   "\N{alpha}".

       o   HTML	abbrevations like "\N{eacute}",	"\N{ccedil}", "\N{iuml}".

       o   Diacritic abbreviations: "\N{macron}", "\N{acute}", "\N{grave}",
	   "\N{diaeresis }", "\N{dier}", "\N{circumflex	}", "\N{circ}",	and
	   "\N{tilde}";	"\N{stress1}" and "\N{stress2}".

       o   Abbreviations for the type of entry:

	   "\N{ali}" (unassimilated), "\N{obs}"	(obsolete), "\N{xref}"
	   (crossreference), "\N{ill}" (illustrative), "\N{spu}"
	   (catachrestic), and "\N{err}" (erroneous).

ERRORS
       TO BE WRITTEN: ERRORS

ENVIRONMENT
       PAGER

FILES
       words.utf8

PROGRAMS
       look, agrep

BUGS
       TO BE WRITTEN: BUGS

SEE ALSO
       perlre(1), perlunicode(1)

AUTHOR
       TO BE WRITTEN: AUTHOR

COPYRIGHT AND LICENCE
       TO BE WRITTEN: COPYRIGHT	AND LICENCE

perl v5.32.1			  2021-03-01			    UNILOOK(1)

NAME | SYNOPSIS | DESCRIPTION | EXAMPLES | OPTIONS | PATTERN SHORTCUTS | ERRORS | ENVIRONMENT | FILES | PROGRAMS | BUGS | SEE ALSO | AUTHOR | COPYRIGHT AND LICENCE

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