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NANORC(5)		      File Formats Manual		     NANORC(5)

NAME
       nanorc -	GNU nano's configuration file

DESCRIPTION
       The  nanorc  files  contain  the	default	settings for nano, a small and
       friendly	editor.	 During	startup, if --rcfile is	not given,  nano  will
       read  two  files: first the system-wide settings, from /etc/nanorc (the
       exact path might	be different on	your system), and then	the  user-spe-
       cific	settings,    either   from   ~/.nanorc	 or   from   $XDG_CON-
       FIG_HOME/nano/nanorc or from ~/.config/nano/nanorc,  whichever  is  en-
       countered  first.  If --rcfile is given,	nano will read just the	speci-
       fied settings file.

NOTICE
       Since version 4.0, nano by default:

	   o does not automatically hard-wrap lines that become	overlong,
	   o includes the line below the title bar in the editing area,
	   o does linewise (smooth) scrolling.

       To get the old, Pico behavior back, you can use set breaklonglines, set
       emptyline, and set jumpyscrolling.

OPTIONS
       The  configuration  file	 accepts  a  series of set and unset commands,
       which can be used to configure nano on startup without  using  command-
       line  options.	Additionally, there are	some commands to define	syntax
       highlighting and	to rebind keys -- see the  two	separate  sections  on
       those.	nano  reads  one  command per line.  All commands and keywords
       should be written in lowercase.

       Options in nanorc files take precedence over nano's defaults, and  com-
       mand-line  options override nanorc settings.  Also, options that	do not
       take an argument	are unset by default.  So using	the unset  command  is
       only  needed  when wanting to override a	setting	of the system's	nanorc
       file in your own	nanorc.	 Options that take an argument cannot  be  un-
       set.

       Quotes  inside  the characters  parameters below	should not be escaped.
       The last	double quote on	the line will be seen as the closing quote.

       The supported commands and arguments are:

       set afterends
	  Make Ctrl+Right and Ctrl+Delete stop at word ends instead of	begin-
	  nings.

       set allow_insecure_backup
	  When	backing	up files, allow	the backup to succeed even if its per-
	  missions can't be (re)set due	to  special  OS	 considerations.   You
	  should NOT enable this option	unless you are sure you	need it.

       set atblanks
	  When	soft  line  wrapping  is  enabled, make	it wrap	lines at blank
	  characters (tabs and spaces) instead of always at the	 edge  of  the
	  screen.

       set autoindent
	  Automatically	indent a newly created line to the same	number of tabs
	  and/or spaces	as the previous	line (or as the	next line if the  pre-
	  vious	line is	the beginning of a paragraph).

       set backup
	  When	saving	a  file, create	a backup file by adding	a tilde	(~) to
	  the file's name.

       set backupdir directory
	  Make and keep	not just one backup file, but make and keep a uniquely
	  numbered  one	every time a file is saved -- when backups are enabled
	  with set backup or --backup or -B.  The uniquely numbered files  are
	  stored in the	specified directory.

       set boldtext
	  Use bold instead of reverse video for	the title bar, status bar, key
	  combos, function tags, line numbers, and selected text.  This	can be
	  overridden by	setting	the options titlecolor,	statuscolor, keycolor,
	  functioncolor, numbercolor, and selectedcolor.

       set bookstyle
	  When justifying, treat any line that starts with whitespace  as  the
	  beginning of a paragraph (unless auto-indenting is on).

       set brackets "characters"
	  Set the characters treated as	closing	brackets when justifying para-
	  graphs.  This	may not	include	blank characters.  Only	closing	 punc-
	  tuation  (see	set punct), optionally followed	by the specified clos-
	  ing brackets,	can end	sentences.  The	default	value is ""')>]}".

       set breaklonglines
	  Automatically	hard-wrap the current line when	it becomes overlong.

       set casesensitive
	  Do case-sensitive searches by	default.

       set constantshow
	  Constantly display the cursor	position  in  the  status  bar.	  This
	  overrides the	option quickblank.

       set cutfromcursor
	  Use  cut-from-cursor-to-end-of-line  by  default, instead of cutting
	  the whole line.

       set emptyline
	  Do not use the line below the	title bar, leaving it entirely blank.

       set errorcolor [bold,][italic,]fgcolor,bgcolor
	  Use this color combination for the status bar	when an	error  message
	  is displayed.	 The default value is brightwhite,red.	See set	title-
	  color	for valid color	names.

       set fill	number
	  Set the target width for justifying and automatic  hard-wrapping  at
	  this	number	of  columns.  If the value is 0	or less, wrapping will
	  occur	at the width of	the screen minus number	columns, allowing  the
	  wrap	point to vary along with the width of the screen if the	screen
	  is resized.  The default value is -8.

       set functioncolor [bold,][italic,]fgcolor,bgcolor
	  Specify the color combination	to use for the	function  descriptions
	  in  the  two help lines at the bottom	of the screen.	See set	title-
	  color	for more details.

       set guidestripe number
	  Draw a vertical stripe at the	given column, to help judge the	 width
	  of  the  text.   (The	 color	of  the	stripe can be changed with set
	  stripecolor.)

       set historylog
	  Save the last	hundred	search strings and replacement strings and ex-
	  ecuted commands, so they can be easily reused	in later sessions.

       set indicator
	  Display  a "scrollbar" on the	righthand side of the edit window.  It
	  shows	the position of	the viewport in	the buffer and how much	of the
	  buffer is covered by the viewport.

       set jumpyscrolling
	  Scroll the buffer contents per half-screen instead of	per line.

       set keycolor [bold,][italic,]fgcolor,bgcolor
	  Specify  the color combination to use	for the	shortcut key combos in
	  the two help lines at	the bottom of the screen.  See set  titlecolor
	  for more details.

       set linenumbers
	  Display line numbers to the left of the text area.

       set locking
	  Enable vim-style lock-files for when editing files.

       set matchbrackets "characters"
	  Set  the  opening  and closing brackets that can be found by bracket
	  searches.  This may not include blank	characters.  The  opening  set
	  must	come  before  the closing set, and the two sets	must be	in the
	  same order.  The default value is "(<[{)>]}".

       set morespace
	  Deprecated option since it has become	 the  default  setting.	  When
	  needed, use unset emptyline instead.

       set mouse
	  Enable  mouse	 support, if available for your	system.	 When enabled,
	  mouse	clicks can be used to place the	cursor,	set the	mark  (with  a
	  double  click), and execute shortcuts.  The mouse will work in the X
	  Window System, and on	the console when gpm  is  running.   Text  can
	  still	be selected through dragging by	holding	down the Shift key.

       set multibuffer
	  When	reading	 in a file with	^R, insert it into a new buffer	by de-
	  fault.

       set noconvert
	  Don't	convert	files from DOS/Mac format.

       set nohelp
	  Don't	display	the two	help lines at the bottom of the	screen.

       set nonewlines
	  Don't	automatically add a newline when a text	does not end with one.
	  (This	can cause you to save non-POSIX	text files.)

       set nopauses
	  Obsolete option.  Ignored.

       set nowrap
	  Deprecated  option  since  it	 has become the	default	setting.  When
	  needed, use unset breaklonglines instead.

       set numbercolor [bold,][italic,]fgcolor,bgcolor
	  Specify the color combination	to use for line	numbers.  See set  ti-
	  tlecolor for more details.

       set operatingdir	directory
	  nano	will only read and write files inside directory	and its	subdi-
	  rectories.  Also, the	current	directory is changed to	here, so files
	  are  inserted	from this directory.  By default, the operating	direc-
	  tory feature is turned off.

       set positionlog
	  Save the cursor position of files  between  editing  sessions.   The
	  cursor  position  is	remembered  for	 the  200 most-recently	edited
	  files.

       set preserve
	  Preserve the XON and XOFF keys (^Q and ^S).

       set punct "characters"
	  Set the characters treated as	closing	 punctuation  when  justifying
	  paragraphs.	This may not include blank characters.	Only the spec-
	  fified closing punctuation, optionally followed by closing  brackets
	  (see brackets), can end sentences.  The default value	is "!.?".

       set quickblank
	  Do quick status-bar blanking:	status-bar messages will disappear af-
	  ter 1	keystroke instead of 25.  The  option  constantshow  overrides
	  this.

       set quotestr "regex"
	  Set  the regular expression for matching the quoting part of a line.
	  The default value is	"^([ \t]*([!#%:;>|}]|//))+".   (Note  that  \t
	  stands  for an actual	Tab character.)	 This makes it possible	to re-
	  justify blocks of quoted text	when composing email,  and  to	rewrap
	  blocks of line comments when writing source code.

       set rawsequences
	  Interpret  escape  sequences	directly (instead of asking ncurses to
	  translate them).  If you need	this option to get  your  keyboard  to
	  work	properly,  please  report  a  bug.  Using this option disables
	  nano's mouse support.

       set rebinddelete
	  Interpret the	Delete and Backspace keys  differently	so  that  both
	  Backspace and	Delete work properly.  You should only use this	option
	  when on your system either Backspace acts like Delete	or Delete acts
	  like Backspace.

       set regexp
	  Do  regular-expression  searches by default.	Regular	expressions in
	  nano are of the extended type	(ERE).

       set saveonexit
	  Save a changed buffer	automatically  on  exit	 (^X);	don't  prompt.
	  (The old form	of this	option,	set tempfile, is deprecated.)

       set selectedcolor [bold,][italic,]fgcolor,bgcolor
	  Specify the color combination	to use for selected text.  See set ti-
	  tlecolor for more details.

       set showcursor
	  Put the cursor on the	highlighted item in the	file browser,  to  aid
	  braille users.

       set smarthome
	  Make the Home	key smarter.  When Home	is pressed anywhere but	at the
	  very beginning of non-whitespace characters on a  line,  the	cursor
	  will	jump to	that beginning (either forwards	or backwards).	If the
	  cursor is already at that position, it will jump to the true	begin-
	  ning of the line.

       set smooth
	  Deprecated  option  since  it	 has become the	default	setting.  When
	  needed, use unset jumpyscrolling instead.

       set softwrap
	  Display lines	that exceed the	screen's width	over  multiple	screen
	  lines.  (You can make	this soft-wrapping occur at whitespace instead
	  of rudely at the screen's edge, by using also	set atblanks.)

       set speller "program [argument ...]"
	  Use the given	program	to do spell checking and  correcting,  instead
	  of using the built-in	corrector that calls hunspell or GNU spell.

       set statuscolor [bold,][italic,]fgcolor,bgcolor
	  Specify  the	color  combination to use for the status bar.  See set
	  titlecolor for more details.

       set stripecolor [bold,][italic,]fgcolor,bgcolor
	  Specify the color  combination  to  use  for	the  vertical  guiding
	  stripe.  See set titlecolor for more details.

       set suspendable
	  Allow	nano to	be suspended (with ^Z by default).

       set tabsize number
	  Use  a  tab  size  of	 number	 columns.  The value of	number must be
	  greater than 0.  The default value is	8.

       set tabstospaces
	  Convert typed	tabs to	spaces.

       set titlecolor [bold,][italic,]fgcolor,bgcolor
	  Specify the color combination	to use for the title bar.  Valid names
	  for  the foreground and background colors are: red, green, blue, ma-
	  genta, yellow, cyan, white, and black.  Each of  these  eight	 names
	  may  be  prefixed  with  the word light to get a brighter version of
	  that color.  On terminal emulators that can do at least 256  colors,
	  other	valid (but unprefixable) color names are: pink,	purple,	mauve,
	  lagoon, mint,	lime, peach, orange, latte, and	normal -- where	normal
	  means	 the default foreground	or background color.  Either "fgcolor"
	  or ",bgcolor"	may be left out, and the pair may be preceded by  bold
	  and/or  italic  (separated  by commas) to get	a bold and/or slanting
	  typeface, if your terminal can do those.

       set trimblanks
	  Remove trailing whitespace from wrapped lines	when  automatic	 hard-
	  wrapping occurs or when text is justified.

       set unix
	  Save	a  file	 by default in Unix format.  This overrides nano's de-
	  fault	behavior of saving a file in the format	that  it  had.	 (This
	  option has no	effect when you	also use set noconvert.)

       set view
	  Disallow  file  modification:	 read-only mode.  This mode allows the
	  user to open also other files	for viewing,  unless  --restricted  is
	  given	on the command line.

       set whitespace "characters"
	  Set  the  two	 characters  used to indicate the presence of tabs and
	  spaces.  They	must be	single-column characters.   The	 default  pair
	  for a	UTF-8 locale is	">>.", and for other locales ">.".

       set wordbounds
	  Detect  word	boundaries differently by treating punctuation charac-
	  ters as parts	of words.

       set wordchars "characters"
	  Specify which	other  characters  (besides  the  normal  alphanumeric
	  ones)	 should	 be considered as parts	of words.  When	using this op-
	  tion,	you probably want to unset wordbounds.

       set zap
	  Let an unmodified Backspace or Delete	erase the marked  region  (in-
	  stead	of a single character, and without affecting the cutbuffer).

SYNTAX HIGHLIGHTING
       Coloring	the different syntactic	elements of a file is done via regular
       expressions (see	the color command below).  This	is  inherently	imper-
       fect,  because  regular	expressions  are  not powerful enough to fully
       parse a file.  Nevertheless, regular expressions	can do a lot  and  are
       easy to make, so	they are a good	fit for	a small	editor like nano.

       All regular expressions in nano are POSIX extended regular expressions.
       This means that ., ?, *,	+, ^, $, and several other characters are spe-
       cial.  The period . matches any single character, ? means the preceding
       item is optional, * means the preceding item may	 be  matched  zero  or
       more  times,  +	means  the  preceding item must	be matched one or more
       times, ^	matches	the beginning of a line, and $ the end,	\< matches the
       start of	a word,	and \> the end,	and \s matches a blank.	 It also means
       that lookahead and lookbehind are not possible.	A complete explanation
       can be found in the manual page of GNU grep: man	grep.

       For  each kind of file a	separate syntax	can be defined via the follow-
       ing commands:

       syntax name ["fileregex"	...]
	      Start the	definition of a	syntax with this name.	All subsequent
	      color  and other such commands will be added to this syntax, un-
	      til a new	syntax command is encountered.

	      When nano	is run,	this syntax will be automatically activated if
	      the  current  filename  matches  the extended regular expression
	      fileregex.  Or the syntax	can be explicitly activated  by	 using
	      the -Y or	--syntax command-line option followed by the name.

	      The  syntax  default  is special:	it takes no fileregex, and ap-
	      plies to files that don't	match any syntax's regexes.  The  syn-
	      tax  none	 is reserved; specifying it on the command line	is the
	      same as not having a syntax at all.

       header "regex" ...
	      If from all defined syntaxes no fileregex	matched, then  compare
	      this  regex  (or	regexes) against the first line	of the current
	      file, to determine whether this syntax should be used for	it.

       magic "regex" ...
	      If no fileregex matched and no header regex matched either, then
	      compare  this  regex (or regexes)	against	the result of querying
	      the magic	database about the current file, to determine  whether
	      this  syntax  should  be	used for it.  (This functionality only
	      works when libmagic is installed	on  the	 system	 and  will  be
	      silently ignored otherwise.)

       formatter program [argument ...]
	      Run  the	given program on the full contents of the current buf-
	      fer.  (The current buffer	is written out to  a  temporary	 file,
	      the  program  is	run on it, and then the	temporary file is read
	      back in, replacing the contents of the buffer.)

       linter program [argument	...]
	      Use the given program to run a syntax check on the current  buf-
	      fer.

       comment "string"
	      Use  the given string for	commenting and uncommenting lines.  If
	      the string contains a vertical bar or pipe character  (|),  this
	      designates  bracket-style	comments; for example, "/*|*/" for CSS
	      files.  The characters before the	pipe are prepended to the line
	      and the characters after the pipe	are appended at	the end	of the
	      line.  If	no pipe	character  is  present,	 the  full  string  is
	      prepended;  for  example,	"#" for	Python files.  If empty	double
	      quotes are specified, the	 comment/uncomment  function  is  dis-
	      abled; for example, "" for JSON.	The default value is "#".

       tabgives	"string"
	      Make  the	 <Tab>	key produce the	given string.  Useful for lan-
	      guages like Python that want to see only spaces for indentation.
	      This overrides the setting of the	tabstospaces option.

       color [bold,][italic,]fgcolor,bgcolor "regex" ...
	      Paint all	pieces of text that match the extended regular expres-
	      sion regex with the given	foreground and background  colors,  at
	      least  one  of  which must be specified.	Valid color names are:
	      red, green, blue,	magenta, yellow, cyan, white, and black.  Each
	      of  these	eight names may	be prefixed with the word light	to get
	      a	brighter version of that color.	 On  terminal  emulators  that
	      can do at	least 256 colors, other	valid (but unprefixable) color
	      names are: pink, purple, mauve, lagoon, mint, lime,  peach,  or-
	      ange,  latte, and	normal -- where	normal means the default fore-
	      ground or	background color.  The color pair may be  preceded  by
	      bold  and/or  italic  (separated by commas) to get a bold	and/or
	      slanting typeface, if your terminal can do those.

	      All coloring commands are	applied	in the order in	which they are
	      specified,  which	 means	that  later commands can recolor stuff
	      that was colored earlier.

       icolor [bold,][italic,]fgcolor,bgcolor "regex" ...
	      Same as above, except that the matching is case insensitive.

       color [bold,][italic,]fgcolor,bgcolor start="fromrx" end="torx"
	      Paint all	pieces of text whose start  matches  extended  regular
	      expression fromrx	and whose end matches extended regular expres-
	      sion torx	with the given foreground and  background  colors,  at
	      least one	of which must be specified.  This means	that, after an
	      initial instance of fromrx, all text until the first instance of
	      torx  will  be colored.  This allows syntax highlighting to span
	      multiple lines.

       icolor [bold,][italic,]fgcolor,bgcolor start="fromrx" end="torx"
	      Same as above, except that the matching is case insensitive.

       include "syntaxfile"
	      Read in self-contained color  syntaxes  from  syntaxfile.	  Note
	      that syntaxfile may contain only the above commands, from	syntax
	      to icolor.

       extendsyntax name command argument ...
	      Extend the syntax	previously defined as name with	 another  com-
	      mand.   This  allows  adding a new color,	icolor,	header,	magic,
	      formatter, linter, comment, or tabgives command  to  an  already
	      defined  syntax  --  useful  when	you want to slightly improve a
	      syntax defined in	one of the system-installed files (which  nor-
	      mally are	not writable).

REBINDING KEYS
       Key bindings can	be changed via the following three commands:

	  bind key function menu
		 Rebinds the given key to the given function in	the given menu
		 (or in	all menus where	the function exists when all is	used).

	  bind key "string" menu
		 Makes the given key produce the given	string	in  the	 given
		 menu (or in all menus where the key exists when all is	used).
		 The string can	consist	of text	or commands or a mix of	 them.
		 (To  enter  a	command	into the string, precede its keystroke
		 with M-V.)

	  unbind key menu
		 Unbinds the given key from the	given menu (or from all	 menus
		 where the key exists when all is used).

       The format of key should	be one of:

	  ^X	 where X is a Latin letter, or one of several ASCII characters
		 (@, ],	\, ^, _), or the word "Space".	Example: ^C.

	  M-X	 where X is any	ASCII character	except [, or the word "Space".
		 Example: M-8.

	  Sh-M-X where	X  is  a  Latin	letter.	 Example: Sh-M-U.  By default,
		 each Meta+letter keystroke does the same as the corresponding
		 Shift+Meta+letter.   But  when	 any  Shift+Meta bind is made,
		 that will no longer be	the case, for all letters.

	  FN	 where N is a numeric value from 1 to 24.  Example: F10.  (Of-
		 ten, F13 to F24 can be	typed as F1 to F12 with	Shift.)

	  Ins or Del.

       Rebinding  ^M (Enter) or	^I (Tab) is probably not a good	idea.  Rebind-
       ing ^[ (Esc) is not possible, because its keycode is the	 starter  byte
       of  Meta	 keystrokes  and escape	sequences.  Rebinding any of the dedi-
       cated cursor-moving keys	(the arrows, Home, End,	PageUp	and  PageDown)
       is not possible.	 On some terminals it's	not possible to	rebind ^H (un-
       less --raw is used) because its keycode is identical  to	 that  of  the
       Backspace key.

       Valid function names to be bound	are:

	  help
	    Invokes the	help viewer.

	  cancel
	    Cancels the	current	command.

	  exit
	    Exits from the program (or from the	help viewer or file browser).

	  writeout
	    Writes the current buffer to disk, asking for a name.

	  savefile
	    Writes the current file to disk without prompting.

	  insert
	    Inserts  a file into the current buffer (at	the current cursor po-
	    sition), or	into a new buffer when option multibuffer is set.

	  whereis
	    Starts a forward search for	text in	the current buffer --  or  for
	    filenames  matching	 a  string  in	the  current  list in the file
	    browser.

	  wherewas
	    Starts a backward search for text in the current buffer -- or  for
	    filenames  matching	 a  string  in	the  current  list in the file
	    browser.

	  findprevious
	    Searches the next occurrence in the	backward direction.

	  findnext
	    Searches the next occurrence in the	forward	direction.

	  replace
	    Interactively replaces text	within the current buffer.

	  cut
	    Cuts and stores the	current	line (or the marked region).

	  copy
	    Copies the current line (or	the marked  region)  without  deleting
	    it.

	  paste
	    Pastes  the	 currently  stored text	into the current buffer	at the
	    current cursor position.

	  zap
	    Throws away	the current line (or the marked	region).  (This	 func-
	    tion is bound by default to	<Meta+Delete>.)

	  chopwordleft
	    Deletes from the cursor position to	the beginning of the preceding
	    word.  (This function is bound by default to  <Shift+Ctrl+Delete>.
	    If	your  terminal	produces ^H for	<Ctrl+Backspace>, you can make
	    <Ctrl+Backspace> delete the	word to	the left of the	cursor by  re-
	    binding ^H to this function.)

	  chopwordright
	    Deletes  from  the	cursor	position  to the beginning of the next
	    word.  (This function is bound by default to <Ctrl+Delete>.)

	  cutrestoffile
	    Cuts all text from the cursor position till	the end	of the buffer.

	  mark
	    Sets the mark at the current position, to  start  selecting	 text.
	    Or,	when it	is set,	unsets the mark.

	  location
	    Reports  the  current  position  of	 the cursor in the buffer: the
	    line, column, and character	positions.   (The  old	name  of  this
	    function, 'curpos',	is deprecated.)

	  wordcount
	    Counts  the	 number	 of words, lines and characters	in the current
	    buffer.

	  execute
	    Prompts for	a program to execute.  The program's  output  will  be
	    inserted into the current buffer (or into a	new buffer when	M-F is
	    toggled).

	  speller
	    Invokes a spell-checking program, either the default  hunspell  or
	    GNU	spell, or the one defined by --speller or set speller.

	  formatter
	    Invokes a full-buffer-processing program (if the active syntax de-
	    fines one).

	  linter
	    Invokes a syntax-checking program (if the  active  syntax  defines
	    one).

	  justify
	    Justifies  the  current paragraph.	A paragraph is a group of con-
	    tiguous lines that,	apart from possibly the	first line,  all  have
	    the	same indentation.  The beginning of a paragraph	is detected by
	    either this	lone line with a differing indentation or by a preced-
	    ing	blank line.

	  fulljustify
	    Justifies the entire current buffer.

	  indent
	    Indents (shifts to the right) the currently	marked text.

	  unindent
	    Unindents (shifts to the left) the currently marked	text.

	  comment
	    Comments or	uncomments the current line or marked lines, using the
	    comment style specified in the active syntax.

	  complete
	    Completes the fragment before the cursor  to  a  full  word	 found
	    elsewhere in the current buffer.

	  left
	    Goes left one position (in the editor or browser).

	  right
	    Goes right one position (in	the editor or browser).

	  up
	    Goes one line up (in the editor or browser).

	  down
	    Goes one line down (in the editor or browser).

	  scrollup
	    Scrolls  the  viewport  up	one  row (meaning that the text	slides
	    down) while	keeping	the cursor in the same text position, if  pos-
	    sible.

	  scrolldown
	    Scrolls  the  viewport  down one row (meaning that the text	slides
	    up)	while keeping the cursor in the	same text position, if	possi-
	    ble.

	  center
	    Scrolls the	line with the cursor to	the middle of the screen.

	  prevword
	    Moves the cursor to	the beginning of the previous word.

	  nextword
	    Moves the cursor to	the beginning of the next word.

	  home
	    Moves the cursor to	the beginning of the current line.

	  end
	    Moves the cursor to	the end	of the current line.

	  beginpara
	    Moves the cursor to	the beginning of the current paragraph.

	  endpara
	    Moves the cursor to	the end	of the current paragraph.

	  prevblock
	    Moves  the	cursor	to  the	 beginning of the current or preceding
	    block of text.  (Blocks are	separated by one or more blank lines.)

	  nextblock
	    Moves the cursor to	the beginning of the next block	of text.

	  pageup
	    Goes up one	screenful.

	  pagedown
	    Goes down one screenful.

	  firstline
	    Goes to the	first line of the file.

	  lastline
	    Goes to the	last line of the file.

	  gotoline
	    Goes to a specific line (and column	if specified).	Negative  num-
	    bers count from the	end of the file	(and end of the	line).

	  findbracket
	    Moves  the	cursor	to the bracket (brace, parenthesis, etc.) that
	    matches (pairs) with the one under the cursor.

	  anchor
	    Places an anchor at	the current line, or removes it	 when  already
	    present.

	  prevanchor
	    Goes to the	first anchor before the	current	line.

	  nextanchor
	    Goes to the	first anchor after the current line.

	  prevbuf
	    Switches to	editing/viewing	the previous buffer when multiple buf-
	    fers are open.

	  nextbuf
	    Switches to	editing/viewing	the next buffer	when multiple  buffers
	    are	open.

	  verbatim
	    Inserts the	next keystroke verbatim	into the file.

	  tab
	    Inserts a tab at the current cursor	location.

	  enter
	    Inserts a new line below the current one.

	  delete
	    Deletes the	character under	the cursor.

	  backspace
	    Deletes the	character before the cursor.

	  recordmacro
	    Starts the recording of keystrokes -- the keystrokes are stored as
	    a macro.  When already recording, the recording is stopped.

	  runmacro
	    Replays the	keystrokes of the last recorded	macro.

	  undo
	    Undoes the last performed text  action  (add  text,	 delete	 text,
	    etc).

	  redo
	    Redoes the last undone action (i.e., it undoes an undo).

	  refresh
	    Refreshes the screen.

	  suspend
	    Suspends  the  editor  (if the suspending function is enabled, see
	    the	suspendable toggle item	below).

	  casesens
	    Toggles whether searching/replacing	ignores	or respects  the  case
	    of the given characters.

	  regexp
	    Toggles  whether searching/replacing uses literal strings or regu-
	    lar	expressions.

	  backwards
	    Toggles whether searching/replacing	goes forward or	backward.

	  older
	    Retrieves the previous (earlier) entry at a	prompt.

	  newer
	    Retrieves the next (later) entry at	a prompt.

	  flipreplace
	    Toggles between searching for something and	replacing something.

	  flipgoto
	    Toggles between searching for text and targeting a line number.

	  flipexecute
	    Toggles between inserting a	file and executing a command.

	  flippipe
	    When executing a command, toggles whether the current  buffer  (or
	    marked region) is piped to the command.

	  flipnewbuffer
	    Toggles  between  inserting	into the current buffer	and into a new
	    empty buffer.

	  flipconvert
	    When reading in a file, toggles between converting	and  not  con-
	    verting it from DOS/Mac format.  Converting	is the default.

	  dosformat
	    When writing a file, switches to writing a DOS format (CR/LF).

	  macformat
	    When writing a file, switches to writing a Mac format.

	  append
	    When writing a file, appends to the	end instead of overwriting.

	  prepend
	    When  writing a file, 'prepends' (writes at	the beginning) instead
	    of overwriting.

	  backup
	    When writing a file, creates a backup of the current file.

	  discardbuffer
	    When about to write	a file,	discard	 the  current  buffer  without
	    saving.   (This  function  is  bound  by  default only when	option
	    --saveonexit is in effect.)

	  browser
	    Starts the file browser (in	the Read File and  Write  Out  menus),
	    allowing to	select a file from a list.

	  gotodir
	    Goes  to  a	directory to be	specified, allowing to browse anywhere
	    in the filesystem.

	  firstfile
	    Goes to the	first file in the list when using the file browser.

	  lastfile
	    Goes to the	last file in the list when using the file browser.

	  nohelp
	    Toggles the	presence of the	two-line list of key bindings  at  the
	    bottom of the screen.  (This toggle	is special: it is available in
	    all	menus except the help viewer and the linter.  All further tog-
	    gles are available in the main menu	only.)

	  constantshow
	    Toggles  the  constant  display  of	 the current line, column, and
	    character positions.

	  softwrap
	    Toggles the	displaying of overlong lines on	multiple screen	lines.

	  linenumbers
	    Toggles the	display	of line	numbers	in front of the	text.

	  whitespacedisplay
	    Toggles the	showing	of whitespace.

	  nosyntax
	    Toggles syntax highlighting.

	  smarthome
	    Toggles the	smartness of the Home key.

	  autoindent
	    Toggles whether a newly created line will contain the same	amount
	    of leading whitespace as the preceding line	-- or as the next line
	    if the preceding line is the beginning of a	paragraph.

	  cutfromcursor
	    Toggles whether cutting text will cut the whole line or just  from
	    the	current	cursor position	to the end of the line.

	  nowrap
	    Toggles whether long lines will be hard-wrapped to the next	line.

	  tabstospaces
	    Toggles whether typed tabs will be converted to spaces.

	  mouse
	    Toggles mouse support.

	  suspendable
	    Toggles  whether  the suspend keystroke (^Z	by default) will actu-
	    ally suspend the editor.  (The old name of	this  function,	 'sus-
	    pendenable', is deprecated.)

       Valid menu sections are:

	  main
	    The	main editor window where text is entered and edited.

	  help
	    The	help-viewer menu.

	  search
	    The	search menu (AKA whereis).

	  replace
	    The	'search	to replace' menu.

	  replacewith
	    The	'replace with' menu, which comes up after 'search to replace'.

	  yesno
	    The	'yesno'	menu, where the	Yes/No/All/Cancel question is asked.

	  gotoline
	    The	'goto line (and	column)' menu.

	  writeout
	    The	'write file' menu.

	  insert
	    The	'insert	file' menu.

	  browser
	    The	 'file browser'	menu, for selecting a file to be opened	or in-
	    serted or written to.

	  whereisfile
	    The	'search	for a file' menu in the	file browser.

	  gotodir
	    The	'go to directory' menu in the file browser.

	  execute
	    The	menu for inserting the output from an external command,	or for
	    filtering  the  buffer  (or	the marked region) through an external
	    command, or	for executing one of several tools.  (The old form  of
	    this menu name, 'extcmd', is deprecated.)

	  spell
	    The	menu of	the integrated spell checker where the user can	edit a
	    misspelled word.

	  linter
	    The	linter menu, which allows jumping  through  the	 linting  mes-
	    sages.

	  all
	    A  special name that encompasses all menus.	 For bind it means all
	    menus where	the specified function exists; for unbind it means all
	    menus where	the specified key exists.

FILES
       /etc/nanorc
	      System-wide configuration	file.

       ~/.nanorc or $XDG_CONFIG_HOME/nano/nanorc or ~/.config/nano/nanorc
	      Per-user configuration file.

SEE ALSO
       nano(1)

July 2020			  version 5.0			     NANORC(5)

NAME | DESCRIPTION | NOTICE | OPTIONS | SYNTAX HIGHLIGHTING | REBINDING KEYS | FILES | SEE ALSO

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