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LSTOPO(1)			     hwloc			     LSTOPO(1)

NAME
       lstopo, lstopo-no-graphics, hwloc-ls - Show the topology	of the system

SYNOPSIS
       lstopo [	options	]... [ filename	]

       lstopo-no-graphics [ options ]... [ filename ]

       hwloc-ls	[ options ]... [ filename ]

       Note that hwloc(7) provides a detailed explanation of the hwloc system;
       it should be read before	reading	this man page

OPTIONS
       --of <format>, --output-format <format>
	      Enforce the output in the	given format.  See the OUTPUT  FORMATS
	      section below.

       -i <file>, --input <file>
	      Read  topology  from XML file <file> (instead of discovering the
	      topology on the local machine).  If <file> is "-", the  standard
	      input  is	used.  XML support must	have been compiled in to hwloc
	      for this option to be usable.

       -i <directory>, --input <directory>
	      Read topology from <directory> instead of	discovering the	topol-
	      ogy  of  the local machine.  On Linux, the directory may contain
	      the topology files gathered from another machine	topology  with
	      hwloc-gather-topology.   On  x86,	 the  directory	 may contain a
	      cpuid dump gathered with hwloc-gather-cpuid.

       -i <specification>, --input <specification>
	      Simulate a fake hierarchy	(instead of discovering	 the  topology
	      on  the local machine). If <specification> is "node:2 pu:3", the
	      topology will contain two	NUMA nodes with	3 processing units  in
	      each of them.  The <specification> string	must end with a	number
	      of PUs.

       --if <format>, --input-format <format>
	      Enforce the input	in the given format, among xml,	fsroot,	 cpuid
	      and synthetic.

       --export-xml-flags <flags>
	      Enforce  flags  when  exporting to the XML format.  Flags	may be
	      given as numeric values or as a  comma-separated	list  of  flag
	      names  that  are	passed	to hwloc_topology_export_xml().	 Those
	      names may	be substrings of actual	flag names as long as a	single
	      one  matches.   A	 value	of  1 (or v1) reverts to the format of
	      hwloc v1.x.  The default is 0 (or	none).

       --export-synthetic-flags	<flags>
	      Enforce flags when exporting to the synthetic format.  Flags may
	      be  given	as numeric values or as	a comma-separated list of flag
	      names  that  are	passed	to  hwloc_topology_export_synthetic().
	      Those  names may be substrings of	actual flag names as long as a
	      single one matches.  A value of 2	(or no_attr)  reverts  to  the
	      format  of hwloc v1.9.  A	value of 3 (or no_ext,no_attr) reverts
	      to the original minimalistic format (before v1.9).  The  default
	      is 0 (or none).

       -v --verbose
	      Include  additional  detail.  The	hwloc-info tool	may be used to
	      display even more	information about specific objects.

       -s --silent
	      Reduce the amount	of details to show.

       --distances
	      Only display distance matrices.

       --memattrs
	      Only display memory  attributes.	 All  of  them	are  displayed
	      (while  the  default textual output selects memory attribute de-
	      tails depending on the verbosity level).

       --cpukinds
	      Only display CPU kinds.

       -f --force
	      If the destination file already exists, overwrite	it.

       -l --logical
	      Display hwloc logical indexes of all objects, with prefix	 "L#".
	      By  default,  both logical and physical/OS indexes are displayed
	      for PUs and NUMA nodes, logical only for cores, dies  and	 pack-
	      ages, and	no index for other types.

       -p --physical
	      Display  OS/physical  indexes  of	all objects, with prefix "P#".
	      By default, both logical and physical/OS indexes	are  displayed
	      for  PUs	and NUMA nodes,	logical	only for cores,	dies and pack-
	      ages, and	no index for other types.

       -c --cpuset
	      Display the cpuset of each object.

       -C --cpuset-only
	      Only display the cpuset of each object; do not display  anything
	      else about the object.

       --taskset
	      Show  CPU	 set  strings  in the format recognized	by the taskset
	      command-line program instead of hwloc-specific  CPU  set	string
	      format.	This  option  should  be  combined  with  --cpuset  or
	      --cpuset-only, otherwise it will imply --cpuset.

       --only <type>
	      Only show	objects	of the given type in the textual output.

       --filter	<type>:<kind>, --filter	<type>
	      Filter objects of	type <type>, or	 of  any  type	if  <type>  is
	      "all".  "io", "cache" and	"icache" are also supported.

	      <kind> specifies the filtering behavior.	If "none" or not spec-
	      ified, all objects of the	given type are removed.	 If "all", all
	      objects  are  kept  as  usual.  If "structure", objects are kept
	      when they	bring structure	to the topology.  If "important" (only
	      applicable  to  I/O),  only  important  objects  are  kept.  See
	      hwloc_topology_set_type_filter() for more	details.

	      hwloc supports filtering any type	except	PUs  and  NUMA	nodes.
	      lstopo  also offers PU and NUMA node filtering by	hiding them in
	      the graphical and	textual	outputs, but any  object  included  in
	      them  (for instance Misc)	will be	hidden as well.	 Note that PUs
	      and NUMA nodes may not be	ignored	in the XML output.  Note  also
	      that  the	 top-level  object type	cannot be ignored (usually Ma-
	      chine or System).

       --ignore	<type>
	      This is the old way to specify --filter <type>:none.

       --no-smt
	      Ignore PUs.  This	is identical to	--filter PU:none.

       --no-caches
	      Do not show caches.  This	is identical to	--filter cache:none.

       --no-useless-caches
	      This is identical	to --filter cache:structure.

       --no-icaches
	      This is identical	to --filter icache:none.

       --disallowed
	      Include objects disallowed by administrative limitations.

       --allow <all|local|0xff|nodeset=0xf0>
	      Include objects disallowed by  administrative  limitations  (im-
	      plies --disallowed) and also change the set of allowed ones.

	      If local is given, only objects available	to the current process
	      are allowed (default behavior when loading from the native oper-
	      ating  system  backend).	 It  may be useful if the topology was
	      created by another process (with	different  administrative  re-
	      strictions  such	as  Linux Cgroups) and loaded here loaded from
	      XML or synthetic.	 This case implies --thissystem.

	      If all, all objects are allowed.

	      If a bitmap is given as a	hexadecimal string, it is used as  the
	      set of allowed PUs.

	      If a bitmap is given after prefix	nodeset=, it is	the set	of al-
	      lowed NUMA nodes.

       --flags <flags>
	      Enforce topology flags.  Flags may be given as numeric values or
	      as  a  comma-separated  list  of	flag  names that are passed to
	      hwloc_topology_set_flags().  Those names may  be	substrings  of
	      actual  flag names as long as a single one matches, for instance
	      disallowed,thissystem_allowed.  The default is 8 (or import).

       --merge
	      Do not show levels that do not have a hierarchical impact.  This
	      sets  HWLOC_TYPE_FILTER_KEEP_STRUCTURE  for  all	object	types.
	      This is identical	to --filter all:structure.

       --no-factorize --no-factorize=<type>
	      Never factorize identical	objects	in the graphical output.

	      If an object type	is given, only factorizing of these objects is
	      disabled.	  This	only applies to	normal CPU-side	objects, it is
	      independent from PCI collapsing.

       --factorize --factorize=[<type>,]<N>[,<L>[,<F>]
	      Factorize	identical children in the graphical output (enabled by
	      default).

	      If <N> is	specified (4 by	default), factorizing only occurs when
	      there are	strictly more than N identical children.  If  <L>  and
	      <F>  are specified, they set the numbers of first	and last chil-
	      dren to keep after factorizing.

	      If an object type	is given, only factorizing of these objects is
	      configured.   This only applies to normal	CPU-side object, it is
	      independent from PCI collapsing.

       --no-collapse
	      Do not collapse identical	PCI devices.   By  default,  identical
	      sibling  PCI  devices  (such  as many virtual functions inside a
	      single physical device) are collapsed.

       --no-cpukinds
	      Do not show different kinds of CPUs in the graphical output.  By
	      default, when supported, different types of lines, thickness and
	      bold font	may be used to display PU boxes	of different kinds.

       --restrict <cpuset>
	      Restrict the topology to the given cpuset.

       --restrict nodeset=<nodeset>
	      Restrict the topology to the given nodeset,  unless  --restrict-
	      flags specifies something	different.

       --restrict binding
	      Restrict	the topology to	the current process binding.  This op-
	      tion requires the	use of the actual current machine topology (or
	      any  other  topology  with --thissystem or with HWLOC_THISSYSTEM
	      set to 1 in the environment).

       --restrict-flags	<flags>
	      Enforce flags when restricting the topology.  Flags may be given
	      as  numeric  values  or  as a comma-separated list of flag names
	      that are passed to hwloc_topology_restrict().  Those  names  may
	      be  substrings  of  actual  flag	names  as long as a single one
	      matches, for instance bynodeset,memless.	The default is	0  (or
	      none).

       --no-io
	      Do  not  show  any  I/O  device or bridge.  This is identical to
	      --filter io:none.	 By default, common devices (GPUs, NICs, block
	      devices, ...) and	interesting bridges/switches are shown.

       --no-bridges
	      Do  not show any I/O bridge except hostbridges.  This is identi-
	      cal to --filter bridge:none.  By default,	common devices	(GPUs,
	      NICs,  block  devices, ...) and interesting bridges/switches are
	      shown.

       --whole-io
	      Show all I/O devices and bridges.	 This is identical to --filter
	      io:all.	By default, only common	devices	(GPUs, NICs, block de-
	      vices, ...) and interesting bridges/switches are shown.

       --thissystem
	      Assume that the selected backend provides	the topology  for  the
	      system  on  which	we are running.	 This is useful	when loading a
	      custom topology such as an XML file and using --restrict binding
	      or --allow all.

       --pid <pid>
	      Detect  topology	as  seen  by process <pid>, i.e. as if process
	      <pid> did	the discovery itself.  Note that this can for instance
	      change  the  set	of allowed processors.	Also show this process
	      current CPU and Memory binding by	marking	the corresponding  PUs
	      and NUMA nodes (in Green in the graphical	output,	see the	COLORS
	      section below, or	by appending (binding)	to  the	 verbose  text
	      output).	 If  0	is  given  as pid, the current binding for the
	      lstopo process will be shown.

       --ps --top
	      Show existing processes as misc objects in the output. To	 avoid
	      uselessly	 cluttering  the  output,  only	processes that are re-
	      stricted to some part of the machine are shown.  On Linux,  ker-
	      nel threads are not shown.  If many processes appear, the	output
	      may become hard to read anyway, making the hwloc-ps program more
	      practical.

       --children-order	<order>
	      Change the order of the different	kinds of children with respect
	      to their parent in the graphical output.

	      The default order	is memoryabove:	it  displays  memory  children
	      above  other  children  (and above the parent if it is a cache).
	      PUs are therefore	below their local NUMA nodes, like  hwloc  1.x
	      did.

	      If  the  order is	changed	to plain, lstopo displays the topology
	      in a basic manner	that strictly matches the actual tree:	memory
	      children	are  listed  below  their  parent  just	like any other
	      child.  PUs are therefore	on the side of their local NUMA	nodes,
	      below a common ancestor.

	      See also the GRAPHICAL OUTPUT section below.

       --fontsize <size>
	      Set the size of text font	in the graphical output.

	      The default is 10.

	      Boxes   are   scaled   according	 to   the   text   size.   The
	      LSTOPO_TEXT_XSCALE environment variable may be used  to  further
	      scale the	width of boxes (its default value is 1.0).

	      The --fontsize option is ignored in the ASCII backend.

       --gridsize <size>
	      Set the margin between elements in the graphical output.

	      The default is 7.	It was 10 prior	to hwloc 2.1.

	      This option is ignored in	the ASCII backend.

       --linespacing <size>
	      Set the spacing between lines of text in the graphical output.

	      The default is 4.

	      The  option  was	included in --gridsize prior to	hwloc 2.1 (and
	      its default was 10).

	      This option is ignored in	the ASCII backend.

       --thickness <size>
	      Set the thickness	of lines and boxes in the graphical output.

	      The default is 1.

	      This option is ignored in	the ASCII backend.

       --horiz,	--horiz=<type1,...>
	      Force a horizontal graphical layout instead of nearly 4/3	 ratio
	      in  the  graphical  output.  If a	comma-separated	list of	object
	      types is given, the layout only  applies	to  the	 corresponding
	      container	objects.  Ignored for bridges since their children are
	      always vertically	aligned.

       --vert, --vert=<type1,...>
	      Force a vertical graphical layout	instead	of nearly 4/3 ratio in
	      the graphical output.  If	a comma-separated list of object types
	      is given,	the layout only	applies	to the corresponding container
	      objects.

       --rect, --rect=<type1,...>
	      Force  a	rectangular  graphical layout with nearly 4/3 ratio in
	      the graphical output.  If	a comma-separated list of object types
	      is given,	the layout only	applies	to the corresponding container
	      objects.	Ignored	for bridges since their	 children  are	always
	      vertically aligned.

       --no-text, --no-text=<type1,...>
	      Do  not display any text in boxes	in the graphical output.  If a
	      comma-separated list of object types is given, text is  disabled
	      for the corresponding objects.  This is mostly useful for	remov-
	      ing text from Group objects.

       --text, --text=<type1,...>
	      Display text in boxes in the graphical output (default).	 If  a
	      comma-separated list of object types is given, text is reenabled
	      for the corresponding objects (if	 it  was  previously  disabled
	      with --no-text).

       --no-index, --no-index=<type1,...>
	      Do not show object indexes in the	graphical output.  If a	comma-
	      separated	list of	object types is	given,	indexes	 are  disabled
	      for the corresponding objects.

       --index,	--index=<type1,...>
	      Show  object  indexes  in	 the graphical output (default).  If a
	      comma-separated list of object types is given, indexes are reen-
	      abled  for  the  corresponding  objects (if they were previously
	      disabled with --no-index).

       --no-attrs, --no-attrs=<type1,...>
	      Do not show object attributes (such as memory size, cache	 size,
	      PCI  bus ID, PCI link speed, etc.)  in the graphical output.  If
	      a	comma-separated	list of	object types is	given, attributes  are
	      disabled for the corresponding objects.

       --attrs,	--attrs=<type1,...>
	      Show object attributes (such as memory size, cache size, PCI bus
	      ID, PCI link speed, etc.)	 in the	 graphical  output  (default).
	      If  a  comma-separated list of object types is given, attributes
	      are reenabled for	the corresponding objects (if they were	previ-
	      ously disabled with --no-attrs).

       --no-legend
	      Remove all text legend lines at the bottom of the	graphical out-
	      put.

       --no-default-legend
	      Remove default text legend lines at the bottom of	the  graphical
	      output.	User-added  legend  lines  with	--append-legend	or the
	      "lstopoLegend" info are still displayed if any.

       --append-legend <line>
	      Append the line of text to the  bottom  of  the  legend  in  the
	      graphical	output.	 If adding multiple lines, each	line should be
	      given separately by passing this option multiple	times.	 Addi-
	      tional  legend  lines  may also be specified inside the topology
	      using the	"lstopoLegend" info attributes on  the	topology  root
	      object.

       --binding-color none
	      Do  not  colorize	PUs and	NUMA nodes according to	the binding in
	      the graphical output.

       --disallowed-color none
	      Do not colorize disallowed PUs and NUMA nodes in	the  graphical
	      output.

       --top-color <none|#xxyyzz>
	      Do  not colorize task objects in the graphical output when --top
	      is given,	or change the background color.

       --version
	      Report version and exit.

       -h --help
	      Display help message and exit.

DESCRIPTION
       lstopo and lstopo-no-graphics are capable of displaying	a  topological
       map  of	the system in a	variety	of different output formats.  The only
       difference between lstopo and lstopo-no-graphics	is that	graphical out-
       puts  are  only supported by lstopo, to reduce dependencies on external
       libraries.  hwloc-ls is identical to lstopo-no-graphics.

       The filename specified directly implies the output format that will  be
       used;  see the OUTPUT FORMATS section, below.  Output formats that sup-
       port color will indicate	specific characteristics about individual CPUs
       by their	color; see the COLORS section, below.

OUTPUT FORMATS
       By  default, if no output filename is specific, the output is sent to a
       graphical window	if possible in the current environment (DISPLAY	 envi-
       ronment variable	set on Unix, etc.).  Otherwise,	a text summary is dis-
       played in the console.

       The filename on the command line	usually	determines the format  of  the
       output.	 There	are a few filenames that indicate specific output for-
       mats and	devices	(e.g., a filename of "-" will output a text summary to
       stdout),	but most filenames indicate the	desired	output format by their
       suffix (e.g., "topo.png"	will output a PNG-format file).

       The format of the output	may also be  changed  with  "--of".   For  in-
       stance, "--of pdf" will generate	a PDF-format file on the standard out-
       put, while "--of	fig toto" will output a	Xfig-format file named "toto".

       The list	of currently supported formats is given	below. Any of them may
       be used with "--of" or as a filename suffix.

       default
	      Send  the	 output	to a window or to the console depending	on the
	      environment.

       console
	      Send a text summary to stdout.  Binding or unallowed  processors
	      are  only	annotated in this mode if verbose; see the COLORS sec-
	      tion, below.

       ascii  Output an	ASCII art representation of the	map  (formerly	called
	      txt).   If  outputting  to stdout	and if colors are supported on
	      the terminal, the	output will be colorized.

       tikz or tex
	      Output a LaTeX tikzpicture representation	of the map that	can be
	      compiled with a LaTeX compiler.

       fig    Output a representation of the map that can be loaded in Xfig.

       svg    Output a SVG representation of the map, using Cairo (by default,
	      if supported) or a native	SVG  backend  (fallback,  always  sup-
	      ported).	See cairosvg and nativesvg below.

       cairosvg	or svg(cairo)
	      If  lstopo  was  compiled	 with the proper support, output a SVG
	      representation of	the map	using Cairo.

       nativesvg or svg(native)
	      Output a SVG representation of the  map  using  the  native  SVG
	      backend.	It may be less pretty than the Cairo output, but it is
	      always supported,	and SVG	objects	have attributes	for  identify-
	      ing  and manipulating them.  See dynamic_SVG_example.html	for an
	      example.

       pdf    If lstopo	was compiled with the proper support, lstopo outputs a
	      PDF representation of the	map.

       ps     If lstopo	was compiled with the proper support, lstopo outputs a
	      Postscript representation	of the map.

       png    If lstopo	was compiled with the proper support, lstopo outputs a
	      PNG representation of the	map.

       synthetic
	      If  the  topology	is symmetric (which requires that the root ob-
	      ject has its symmetric_subtree field set), lstopo	outputs	a syn-
	      thetic  description string.  This	output may be reused as	an in-
	      put synthetic topology description later.	  See  also  the  Syn-
	      thetic  topologies section in the	documentation.	Note that Misc
	      and I/O devices are ignored during this export.

       xml    If lstopo	was compiled with the proper support,  lstopo  outputs
	      an  XML representation of	the map.  It may be reused later, even
	      on another machine, with lstopo --input, the HWLOC_XMLFILE envi-
	      ronment variable,	or the hwloc_topology_set_xml()	function.

       The following special names may be used:

       -      Send a text summary to stdout.

       /dev/stdout
	      Send  a  text  summary to	stdout.	 It is effectively the same as
	      specifying "-".

       -.<format>
	      If the entire filename is	"-.<format>",  lstopo  behaves	as  if
	      "--of  <format>  -"  was	given, which means a file of the given
	      format is	sent to	the standard output.

       See the output of "lstopo --help" for a specific	list of	what graphical
       output formats are supported in your hwloc installation.

GRAPHICAL OUTPUT
       The graphical output is made of nested boxes representing the inclusion
       of objects in the hierarchy of resources.  Usually a Machine  box  con-
       tains  one  or several Package boxes, that contain multiple Core	boxes,
       with one	or several PUs each.

   Caches
       Caches are displayed in a slightly different manner because they	do not
       actually	include	computing resources such as cores.  For	instance, a L2
       Cache shared by a pair of Cores is drawn	as a Cache box on top  of  two
       Core boxes (instead of having Core boxes	inside the Cache box).

   NUMA	nodes and Memory-side Caches
       By  default, NUMA nodes boxes are drawn on top of their local computing
       resources.  For instance, a processor Package containing	one NUMA  node
       and  four  Cores	is displayed as	a Package box containing the NUMA node
       box above four Core boxes.  If a	NUMA node is local to  the  L3	Cache,
       the  NUMA  node	is  displayed above that Cache box.  All this specific
       drawing strategy	for memory objects may be disabled by passing command-
       line option --children-order plain.

       If multiple NUMA	nodes are attached to the same parent object, they are
       displayed inside	an additional unnamed memory box.

       If some Memory-side Caches exist	in front of some NUMA nodes, they  are
       drawn as	boxes immediately above	them.

   PCI bridges,	PCI devices and	OS devices
       The PCI hierarchy is not	drawn as a set of included boxes but rather as
       a tree of bridges (that may actually be switches)  with	links  between
       them.   The  tree  starts with a	small square on	the left for the host-
       bridge or root complex.	It ends	with PCI device	boxes  on  the	right.
       Intermediate  PCI  bridges/switches  may	 appear	 as  additional	 small
       squares in the middle.

       PCI devices on the right	of the tree are	boxes containing their PCI bus
       ID  (such  as  00:02.3).	 They may also contain sub-boxes for OS	device
       objects such as a network interface eth0	or a CUDA GPU cuda0.

       The datarate of a PCI link may be written (in  GB/s)  right  below  its
       drawn line (if the operating system and/or libraries are	able to	report
       that information).  This	 datarate  is  the  currently  configured  PCI
       datarate.   It  may change during execution since some devices are able
       to slow their PCI links down when idle.

       When there is a single link (horizontal line) on	the  right  of	a  PCI
       bridge,	it  means  that	 a single device or bridge is connected	on the
       secondary PCI bus behind	that bridge.  When there is a  vertical	 line,
       it means	that multiple devices and/or bridges are connected to the same
       secondary PCI bus.

COLORS
       Individual CPUs and NUMA	nodes are colored in the graphical output for-
       mats to indicate	different characteristics:

       Green  The  topology  is	 reported  as  seen by a specific process (see
	      --pid), and the given CPU	or NUMA	node is	in this	process	CPU or
	      Memory binding mask.

       White  The  CPU or NUMA node is in the allowed set (see below).	If the
	      topology is reported as seen by a	specific process (see  --pid),
	      the object is also not in	this process binding mask.

       Red    The CPU or NUMA node is not in the allowed set (see below).

       The "allowed set" is the	set of CPUs or NUMA nodes to which the current
       process is allowed to bind.  The	allowed	set is usually	either	inher-
       ited  from the parent process or	set by administrative qpolicies	on the
       system.	Linux cpusets are one example of limiting the allowed set  for
       a process and its children to be	less than the full set of CPUs or NUMA
       nodes on	the system.

       Different processes may therefore have different	CPUs or	NUMA nodes  in
       the  allowed  set.  Hence, invoking lstopo in different contexts	and/or
       as different users may display different	colors for the same individual
       CPUs  (e.g.,  running  lstopo in	one context may	show a specific	CPU as
       red, but	running	lstopo in a different context may show the same	CPU as
       white).

       Some  lstopo output modes, e.g. the console mode	(default non-graphical
       output),	do not support colors at all.  The console mode	 displays  the
       above characteristics by	appending text to each PU line if verbose mes-
       sages are enabled.

CUSTOM COLORS
       The color of each object	in the graphical output	 may  be  enforced  by
       specifying  a  "lstopoStyle"  info attribute in that object.  Its value
       should be a semi-colon separated	list  of  "<attribute>=#rrggbb"	 where
       rr,  gg	and  bb	 are the RGB components	of a color, each between 0 and
       255, in hexadecimal (00 to ff).	<attribute> may	be

       Background
	      Sets the background color	of the main object box.

       Text   Sets the color of	the text showing the object name, type,	index,
	      etc.

       Text2  Sets  the	 color of the additional text near the object, for in-
	      stance the link speed behind a PCI bridge.

       The "lstopoStyle" info may be added to a	temporarily-saved XML  topolo-
       gies  with hwloc-annotate, or with hwloc_obj_add_info().	 For instance,
       to display all core objects in blue (with white names):

	   lstopo save.xml
	   hwloc-annotate save.xml save.xml core:all info  lstopoStyle	"Back-
       ground=#0000ff;Text=#ffffff"
	   lstopo -i save.xml

LAYOUT
       In  its	graphical output, lstopo uses simple rectangular heuristics to
       try to achieve a	4/3 ratio between width	and height.  Although the  hi-
       erarchy	of resources is	properly reflected, the	exact physical organi-
       zation (NUMA distances, rings, complete graphs, etc.) is	currently  ig-
       nored.	The layout of a	level may be changed with --vert, --horiz, and
       --rect.

       The position of memory children with respect to other children  objects
       may be changed using --children-order.

EXAMPLES
       To display the machine topology in textual mode:

	   lstopo-no-graphics

       To display the machine topology in ascii-art mode:

	   lstopo-no-graphics -.ascii

       To  display  in	graphical  mode	(assuming that the DISPLAY environment
       variable	is set to a relevant value):

	   lstopo

       To export the topology to a PNG file:

	   lstopo file.png

       To export an XML	file on	a machine and later display the	 corresponding
       graphical output	on another machine:

	   machine1$ lstopo file.xml
	   <transfer file.xml from machine1 to machine2>
	   machine2$ lstopo --input file.xml

       To  save	the current machine topology to	XML and	later reload it	faster
       while still considering it as the current machine:

	  $ lstopo file.xml
	  <...>
	  $ lstopo --input file.xml --thissystem

       To restrict an XML topology to only physical processors 0, 1, 4 and 5:

	   lstopo --input file.xml --restrict 0x33 newfile.xml

       To restrict an XML topology to only numa	node whose logical index is 1:

	   lstopo --input file.xml --restrict  $(hwloc-calc  --input  file.xml
       node:1) newfile.xml

       To display a summary of the topology:

	   lstopo -s

       To get more details about the topology:

	   lstopo -v

       To only show cores:

	   lstopo --only core

       To show cpusets:

	   lstopo --cpuset

       To only show the	cpusets	of package:

	   lstopo --only package --cpuset-only

       Simulate	 a  fake  hierarchy; this example shows	with 2 NUMA nodes of 2
       processor units:

	   lstopo --input "node:2 2"

       To count	the number of logical processors in the	system

	  lstopo --only	pu | wc	-l

       To append the kernel release and	version	to the graphical legend:

	  lstopo --append-legend "Kernel release: $(uname -r)" --append-legend
       "Kernel version:	$(uname	-v)"

SEE ALSO
       hwloc(7), hwloc-info(1),	hwloc-bind(1), hwloc-annotate(1), hwloc-ps(1),
       hwloc-gather-topology(1), hwloc-gather-cpuid(1)

2.4.1				 Feb 11, 2021			     LSTOPO(1)

NAME | SYNOPSIS | OPTIONS | DESCRIPTION | OUTPUT FORMATS | GRAPHICAL OUTPUT | COLORS | CUSTOM COLORS | LAYOUT | EXAMPLES | SEE ALSO

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