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icpld(1)		       Internet	daemons			      icpld(1)

NAME
       icpld - Internet	Connection Performance Logging Daemon

SYNOPSIS
       icpld -ip <ip> [OPTIONS]

       or

       icpld -ip6 <ip> [OPTIONS]

       alternatively a mixture of both

DESCRIPTION
       icpld  forks  into  the background and checks for downtime in a network
       connection.

       You can set it to try against any ip, either on	the  internet,	or  on
       your  local network in different	intervals. As from version 0.6.0 icpld
       also supports IPv6 addresses.

       ICPLD can monitor two connection	at once, one IPv4 connection,  and  an
       IPv6  one.   You	 can also limit	the use	to one connection only,	by not
       specifying an ip.  If you only want to monitor an IPv6 connection,  you
       simply  do not specify an IPv4 ip. In case you have both	an IPv4	and an
       IPv6 ip specified in the	configuration file, you	may override  this  by
       specifying  the -4 or the -6 switch. Giving one of these	tells icpld to
       only monitor this. Hence	-6 only	 monitors  an  IPv6  connection,  even
       though there is an IPv4 ip specified in the configuration file.

       As  the name implies, icpld writes a log	as it is running. This logfile
       is by default located in	~/.icpld and is	called 'log'. If you  want  to
       specify	another	 location  for your logfile, you can do	this by	either
       edit the	post logFile in	the configuration file,	or specify  one	 using
       the  -logfile  option. Normally,	when you monitor two connections, they
       are both	logged into this default file, but you can however  specify  a
       special log file	for your IPv6 connection, using	the -logfile6 switch.

       See below for more options

OPTIONS
	 Note that some	of these options are only available when
	 icpld has been	compiled with IPv6 support.

       -h, --help
	      Shows the	help section and exits -ip This	switch is required un-
	      less there is an IPv6 address specified, and  decides  which  ip
	      ICPLD will probe for ICMP	replies

       -ip6   This  specifies which IPv6 ip icpld will probe for ICMP replies.
	      This is optional unless the -6 switch is used. Note that the use
	      of one, does not exclude the other. In other words; you can mon-
	      itor both	an IPv6	and an IPv4 connection	with  the  same	 icpld
	      process

       -fbip  Fallback	ip.  This is the ip ICPLD will double check against if
	      the ip specified with -ip	is not responding

       -fbip6 Same as fbip, but	for the	IPv6 monitoring.

       -detach
	      Giving this argument to icpld will daemonize a process  that  is
	      currently	running	in the foreground. Useful if you want to moni-
	      tor icpld	for a while,  and  then	 fork  it  without  having  to
	      restart icpld and	"pollute" the log files

       -6     This option will tell icpld to use IPv6 only. Mainly used	to ig-
	      nore IPv4	entries	in the configuration file

       -4     This option is used to ignore IPv6 entries in the	 configuration
	      file

       -nd    Prevent ICPLD from daemonizing

       -d     Force  ICPLD  to	damonize  (this	is default, but	can be used to
	      override a configuration file setting)

       -s     Silent. Produces no output what so ever. Has no effect in	combi-
	      nation  with -nd (naturally)

       -m     This option is only useful in combination	with -logfile at which
	      point -m tells icpld to output the whole logfile at once,	 with-
	      out breaks. Virtually the	same as	cat ~/.icpld/log

       -status
	      Shows the	current	state of icpld and the connection

       -log   Displays the performance log

       -turn  Turns  the  log  file  over.  Old	one is saved as	~/.icpld/log.n
	      where n is the next available number. A stamp is put in the  new
	      log, telling you when it was turned

       -reset Resets ICPLD state and log and quit a current ICPLD process

       -quit  Terminates  a  running  ICPLD  process.  Use  this at all	times,
	      rather than sending signals manually

       -interval
	      Sets the interval	in which ICPLD will  check  for	 an  available
	      connection (default 10 seconds)

       -dinterval
	      Sets  the	 interval with which icpld will	check for an available
	      connection, once it has been marked as unavailable.  Will	 over-
	      ride -interval in	case of	downtime. The default is 6 seconds

       -pint  Tells  icpld how frequent	it should send ICMP-packets once it is
	      in a checking cycle. This	option is equivalent to	ping -i	 <dou-
	      ble>  and	 should	 not be	confused with -interval	Default	is one
	      packet per second

       -nobeep
	      Do not generate a	beep when the connection comes back up	(beep-
	      ing is only activated when combined with the -nd switch)

       -logfile
	      Specifies	 which	logfile	 to use	rather than the	default	~/.ic-
	      pld/log Note that	this has an impact on -log as well  as	-turn,
	      if you use icpld with different -log options. A log which	is lo-
	      cated in another place than what	-logfile  says,	 will  not  be
	      turned.

       -logfile6
	      Same as above, but for the IPv6 log. Note	that the same file can
	      be used for both connections.

       -htmlfile
	      ICPLD can, if you	want, duplicate	the log	file into HTML format.
	      This switch tells	ICPLD where to put the html output.

       -htmlfile6
	      Same  as	above,	but for	the duplication	of the IPv6 log	either
	      specified	by -logfile6 or	within the configuration file

       -errfile
	      This option tells	icpld where to save the	log which contains the
	      output  of  ping.	The output is only written if the ping failed.
	      This is useful for debugging since you can not only see when the
	      connection was broken, but also what caused the downtime.

       -errfile6
	      Same as the above, but for the IPv6 connection

       -err   Displays	the contents of	the errors file	(default: ~/.icpld/er-
	      rors)

       -err6  Same as the above, but for the IPv6 errors file

       -config
	      Specifies	which config file to  use.  The	 default  is  /usr/lo-
	      cal/etc/icpld.conf  Usage	 of the	config file at all is optional
	      as ICPLD can be operated throughoutly by command line as well.

       -iface Specifies	which source interface or (on some platforms)  address
	      to use for the checking

       -v, --version
	      Display version info and exits

CONFIG FILE
       ICPLD   automatically  looks  for  a  configuration  file  in  /usr/lo-
       cal/etc/icpld.conf If none is to	be found, it will use the command line
       arguments,  hence  the  configuration file is not necessary, but	may be
       handy and helpful.

       The location of the config file may be altered by supplying the -config
       switch at command line.

       Note  that  all command line arguments overrides	the values in the con-
       figuration file.

       Available config	options:

       ip     This is the target machine, which	we will	try to establish  con-
	      tact with
	      Example: ip=192.168.0.1

       ip6    This  is the target machine, which we will check an IPv6 connec-
	      tion against.
	      Example: ip6=3ffe::1

       fbip   Fallback ip. ICPLD will double check the	connection  status  if
	      the  first  ip  is  not  responding, by probing this ip Example:
	      ip=192.168.0.2

       fbip6  Same as above, but for the IPv6 connection monitoring
	      Example: fbip6=3ffe::2

       interval
	      Will determine how often we will check for response from the ma-
	      chine specified with ip. The unit	is seconds
	      Example: interval=10

       dinterval
	      Determines  how  often we	will check for an available connection
	      after it has been	marked as unavailable. The unit	is seconds
	      Example: dinterval=5

       pint   Tells icpld how frequent it should send ICMP-packets once	it  is
	      in  a checking cycle. This option	is equivalent to ping -i <dou-
	      ble> and should not be confused with -interval  Default  is  one
	      packet per second.
	      Example: pint=1.2

       iface  Specifies	 which interface or (on	some platforms)	address	to use
	      for the checking.	This is	optional,  and	if  excluded  or  left
	      blank,  the kernel default will be used. This only is useful for
	      determining which	trunk is down if you are on a  multi-connected
	      system.	logFile	Specifies the location of the log file we will
	      be stamping.
	      Example: logFile=~/.icpld/log

       logFile6
	      Same as above, but for the IPv6 log. Note	that this  option  may
	      be set identicaly	to logFile
	      Example: logFile6=~/.icpld/log

       htmlFile
	      Same as logFile, but the HTML formatted log.
	      Example: htmlFile=~/public_html/icpld.html

       htmlFile6
	      Same  as above, but the IPv6 log duplication. Note that this may
	      be set identicaly	to the htmlFile	option
	      Example: htmlFile6=~/public_html/icpld.html

       daemonize
	      ICPLD will either	stay in	the foreground,	or fork	to  the	 back-
	      ground  depending	 on  the  value	 of daemonize. daemonize is of
	      boolean type, meaning it is either 'true'	or 'false'.
	      Example: daemonize=false

       nobeep If ICPLD is active in the	foreground, it will  generate  a  beep
	      once  the	connection is back up after downtime. To disable this,
	      set nobeep to true. nobeep is of boolean type, meaning it	is ei-
	      ther 'true' or 'false'
	      Example: nobeep=true

       cmd4dn This  is	a  system  command which will be executed whenever the
	      IPv4 connection drops. This can be useful	when you  wish	to  be
	      alerted whenever your connection goes down.

       cmd4up Same  as above, but when the connection comes back up from down-
	      time

       cmd6dn This is the same as cmd4dn but for the IPv6 connection

       cmd6up Same as cmd4up but for the IPv6 connection

       errfile
	      This option tells	icpld where to save the	log which contains the
	      output of	ping. The output is only written if the	ping failed.

       errfile6
	      Same as the above, but for the IPv6 connection

       Example of a valid and acceptable configuration file
	      for users	which does not have an IPv6 connection to monitor :

	      #	ICPLD config file (/etc/icpld.conf)

	      ip=192.168.0.1

	      fbip=192.168.0.2

	      interval=9

	      dinterval=5

	      pint=1.0

	      daemonize=true

	      logFile=~/.icpld/log

	      htmlFile=~/public_html/icpld.html

	      errfile=~/.icpld/errors

	      nobeep=false

	      cmd4dn=play ~/mysounds/awwww.wav

	      cmd4up=play ~/mysounds/yipee.wav

       Example of a valid configuration	file for
	      monitoring both an IPv4 and an IPv6 connection:

	      ip=192.168.0.1

	      ip6=3ffe::1

	      fbip=192.168.0.2

	      fbip6=3ffe::2

	      interval=9

	      dinterval=5

	      pint=1.0

	      daemonize=true

	      logFile=~/.icpld/log

	      logFile6=~/.icpld/log

	      htmlFile=~/public_html/icpld.html

	      htmlFile=~/public_html/icpld-v6.html

	      errfile=~/.icpld/errors

	      errfile6=~/.icpld/errors

	      nobeep=false

	      cmd4dn=play ~/mysounds/awwww.wav

	      cmd4up=play ~/mysounds/yipee.wav

	      cmd6dn=play ~/mysounds/awwww.wav

	      cmd6up=play ~/mysounds/yipee.wav

AUTHOR
       Erik Ljungstrom <erik@ibiblio.org>

Erik Ljungstrom			     1.1.5			      icpld(1)

NAME | SYNOPSIS | DESCRIPTION | OPTIONS | CONFIG FILE | AUTHOR

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