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dkns(1)			FreeBSD	General	Commands Manual		       dkns(1)

NAME
     dkns -- Text editor

SYNOPSIS
     dkns [<line-number>] <filename>

DESCRIPTION
     Dickens is	an old-school, black-and-white,	one-buffer-in-one-window con-
     sole text editor for 8-bit	text.  It does not understand UTF-8.  Dickens
     is	written	in a custom dialect of lisp called Munger, so the editor is
     programmable, but Dickens is not Emacs.

   Keys	and Chords
     In	the command summaries which follow, lone letters preceded by C-	indi-
     cate a key	chord in which the specified key is to be pressed at the same
     time as the control key.  Lone letters preceded by	M- indicate a key
     chord in which the	specified key is to be pressed at the same time	as the
     alt/meta key, or you can precede the specified key	by a separate press of
     the ESC key.

     Chords made with the control key always consist of	a lower	case character
     and the control key, but chords made with the meta	key consist of either
     the upper or lower	case version of	a character and	the meta key.  For ex-
     ample, M-c	and M-C	are two	distinct commands.

     Keys or key chords	preceded by C-x	indicate this chord is to be pressed
     first separately, followed	by the succeeding keys or key chords.  Such
     commands are called extended commands.  While waiting for the second part
     of	an extended command, the editor	displays "C-x ?" in the	status line.
     To	cancel a pending extended command, press C-u.

     In	the command summaries that follow, a paragraph forward is those	lines
     of	text from the line the cursor is on to the line	to which the cursor
     moves when	M-} is invoked.	 A paragraph backward is those lines of	text
     from the line the cursor is on to the line	to which the cursor moves when
     C-{ is invoked.

   Exiting
     C-x C-c  exits the	editor.

     C-x 9    Will write unsaved changes to disk and exit the editor.

   Command-Line	Arguments
     Command line arguments specify files to load on startup.  If the first
     character of the first argument is	a plus sign (+), then the remaining
     characters	of that	argument are considered	to specify a line number to
     move the cursor to	after loading the file specified by the	second argu-
     ment.  If the remainder of	the first argument is not a positive integer,
     it	is ignored, but	the file specified by the second argument is still
     loaded.  If the first argument does not begin with	a plus sign, then it
     is	assumed	to be a	filename to load into the buffer on startup.  To load
     a file whose name begins with a plus sign,	pass a do-nothing line number
     argument, or qualify the filename:

     % dkns +1 +funnyfile

     % dkns ./+funnyfile

     Other command-line	arguments are assumed to be filenames, and are pushed
     onto the file stack.  See the section titled "Working With	Files" for
     more information on using the file	stack.

   Configuration Options
     The editor	has five configuration settings.

     line_length  This option is a positive integer specifying the desired
		  maximum length of lines.  This value is used by the auto-
		  wrapper and by the paragraph formatter.

     tab_stop	  This option is a positive integer specifying the frequency
		  of tabstops.	Tabstops are considered	to occur every
		  tab_stop characters ad infinitum in the line.

     auto_indent  This option is a boolean which specifies whether or not
		  leading whitespace from the preceding	line should be propa-
		  gated	to a new line when the user terminates a line.

     auto_wrap	  This option is a boolean which specifies whether or not
		  lines	should be automatically	wrapped	when manual input
		  causes a line	to exceed the value of line_length.

     show_match	  This option is a boolean which specifies whether or not the
		  location of opening delimiters are indicated visually	when a
		  closing delimiter is input (")", "}",	or "]").  If the open-
		  ing delimiter	cannot be found, the terminal bell is sounded.
		  In no	case will the editor search farther back than the line
		  which	the cursor would be moved to if	an C-x [ command were
		  invoked from the original cursor position.

     The user's	startup	configuration file, if it exists, must be named	.dkns
     and be located in the user's home directory.  The following example shows
     code to modify the	configuration settings.

     ; These values must be set	via a function call.

     (set_line_length 75)
     (set_tab_stop 3)

     ; The boolean flags may be	set directly.

     (setq auto_indent 1)
     (setq auto_wrap 1)
     (setq show_match 1)

     The following commands are	used to	inspect	or change the configuration
     settings from within the editor.

     C-x @  displays the values	of the user settings.

     C-x N  sets a new value for the line_length variable.

     C-x B  sets a new value for the tab_stop variable.

     C-x I  toggles the	value of the auto_indent variable.

     C-x U  toggles the	value of the auto_wrap variable.

     C-x M  toggles the	value of the show_match	variable.

   Command Prompts
     Some commands require textual or numerical	input from the user.  The edi-
     tor prompts for this input	on the status line.  At	any command prompt,
     three editing commands are	available.  Interactive	completion and a
     browsable history may also	be available for the prompt.  To input a tab
     use C-a.  To input	any other character bound to editing commands, type C-
     v followed	by the desired character.

     C-h  backspaces over the last character of	input.

     C-w  backspaces over the last complete word on the	command	line.

     C-u  backspaces over the entire command line.

     C-p  causes the text input	so far to be replaced with the most recent
	  item in the command's	saved history.	Successive invocations of this
	  command continue to advance backward through the command history.

     C-n  If the C-p command has been invoked, this command causes the current
	  text on the command line to be replaced with the next	item in	the
	  command history.  Successive invocations of this command continue to
	  advance forward through the command history until the	original input
	  text is reached.

     C-a  inserts a tab	character into the input text.

     [tab]
	  invokes interactive filename completion.

     C-c  cancels the input operation.

   Repeating Commands
     M-o    causes the user to be prompted for a repeat	count.	The next com-
	    mand invoked is repeated the specified number of times.  Those
	    commands for which a repeat	count does not make sense ignore the
	    repeat count.

     C-x g  repeats the	most recently invoked command.	This command respects
	    the	repeat count given to the original command.

     C-x [space]
	    starts or stops recording keystrokes for subsequent	playback.

     M-[space]
	    plays the recorded keystrokes.  If this command is given a repeat
	    count, it is respected.  If	C-g is invoked after invoking this
	    command, the last command in the set of recorded keystrokes	is in-
	    voked and not the playback operation.

   The Region
     An	abitrary region	of text	may be delineated for certain operations.  The
     region consists of	the text lying between the cursor and the mark.	 The
     cursor and	the mark are both considered to	be between the character they
     are over and the previous character in the	buffer.	 At the	endpoint that
     occurs earlier in the buffer, the character under the endpoint is in-
     cluded in the region.  At the endpoint occurring later in the buffer, the
     character under the endpoint is outside the region.

     C-[space]	sets the mark before the character the cursor is over.

     C-x C-e	exchanges the cursor position and the mark.

   Working With	Files
     Filename completion is triggered by entering a tab	at the filename
     prompt.  Tab characters themselves	can be entered at the prompt by	invok-
     ing C-a.  To input	any character bound to a line-editing command, type C-
     v followed	by the desired character.  If the last line of a file is not
     terminated	with a newline,	the editor adds	a newline to the end of	that
     line.

     C-x C-f  loads the	buffer from a file.  The buffer	is emptied first, and
	      the user is prompted for the filename.  If the specified file
	      does not exist, the editor assumes the user wants	to edit	a new
	      file.

     C-x 2    stores the filename currently associated with the	buffer and the
	      cursor position, then loads the buffer from a new	file.  The
	      filename and cursor position are stored on a stack, and may be
	      returned to at a later time.  The	specified file must exist, or
	      an error is generated.

     C-x 3    pops the last saved filename and cursor position off the saved
	      file stack.  The editors loads the file and jumps	to the saved
	      cursor position.

     C-x 4    exchanges	the current file and cursor position with those	stored
	      on top of	the file stack.	 This command can be used to quickly
	      switch between two files.

     C-x D    pushes the current file and cursor position onto the file	stack,
	      then shifts the filename and cursor position off the bottom of
	      the file stack.  The editor loads	that file and jumps to that
	      cursor position.	This command may be used to visit each of the
	      files on the file	stack in a circular manner ad infinitum.

     C-x C-s  saves the	buffer to a file.  If the buffer was loaded from a
	      file, the	buffer is written back to that file.  Otherwise, the
	      user is prompted for a filename.	Successive invocations of this
	      command reuse that filename.

     C-x C-a  lists the	filenames saved	on the file stack.

     C-x C-i  Inserts a	file into the buffer after the line the	cursor is on.
	      The user is prompted for the filename.  If the cursor is on the
	      first line in the	buffer,	the user is prompted to	choose between
	      inserting	the file content before	or after the first line.

     C-x W    writes the lines of the region to	a file.	 The user is prompted
	      for the filename.

     C-x F    prompts the user for a new filename to associate with the	buf-
	      fer.  Subsequent invocations of C-x C-s use this filename.

   Working With	External Commands
     For these commands, the region is considered to include the entire	lines
     the region	endpoints lie on, which	is to say that these commands work on
     whole lines.  These commands also prompt the user for a command line,
     which is passed to	the shell (/bin/sh) for	execution.

     C-x C-m
	    filters the	region through an external command.  The lines in the
	    region are replaced	by the command's output.

     C-x &  inserts the	output of a specified command into the buffer, after
	    the	current	line.

     C-x *  writes the lines in	the region to the standard input of a speci-
	    fied command.

     C-x !  runs a command under the shell.

     C-x $  suspends the editor	and returns to the shell from which it was
	    launched.

   Moving The Cursor And Scrolling The Buffer
     Lines longer than the width of the	terminal are truncated onscreen, but
     the editor	scrolls	the screen horizontally	if an attempt is made to move
     to	a destination off the edge of the screen.

     C-f    moves the cursor a character forward in the	buffer.

     C-b    moves the cursor a character backward in the buffer.

     M-f    moves the cursor forward a word in the buffer.

     M-b    moves the cursor backward a	word in	the buffer.

     C-a    moves the cursor to	the beginning of the current line.

     C-e    moves the cursor to	the end	of the current line.

     M-a    moves the cursor to	the sentence ending punctuation	mark occuring
	    before the cursor.

     M-e    moves the cursor to	the sentence ending punctuation	mark occuring
	    after the cursor.

     M-}    moves the cursor forward to	the next blank line or to the line
	    line with a	full-stop in column zero.

     M-{    moves the cursor backward to the previous blank line or to the
	    line with a	full-stop in column zero.

     M-]    moves the cursor forward in	the buffer to the next line having an
	    opening parenthesis, an opening brace, or a	full-stop followed by
	    an uppercase S in column zero (troff section).

     M-[    moves the cursor backward to the previous line in the buffer hav-
	    ing	an opening parenthesis,	an opening brace, or a full-stop fol-
	    lowed by an	uppercase S in column zero.

     M-^    moves the cursor to	the first non-whitespace character in the cur-
	    rent line, if any.

     M-+    moves the cursor to	the first non-whitespace character in the line
	    immediately	after the line the cursor is on.

     M--    moves the cursor to	the first non-whitespace character in the line
	    immediately	preceding the line the cursor is on.

     M-n    scrolls the	buffer upward by one line.

     M-p    scrolls the	buffer downward	by one line.

     C-t    scrolls the	buffer upward to place the line	the cursor is on at
	    the	top of the screen.

     C-l    scrolls the	buffer to place	the line the cursor is on in the mid-
	    dle	of the screen.

     C-c    scrolls the	buffer downward	to place the line the cursor is	on at
	    the	bottom of the screen.

     C-x 0  moves the cursor to	first character	of the line at the top of the
	    screen.

     C-x 1  moves the cursor to	the first character of the line	at the bottom
	    of the screen.

     C-x l  moves the cursor to	the line in the	center of the screen.

     C-v    scrolls the	buffer upward by one screenful of lines.  The cursor
	    is moved to	the bottom line	on the screen.

     M-v    scrolls the	buffer downward	by one screenful of lines.  The	cursor
	    is moved to	the top	line on	the screen.

     M->    moves the cursor to	the last character in the buffer.

     M-<    moves the cursor to	the first character in the buffer.

     C-x #  moves the cusror to	line specified by the user by line number.

   Marking Lines With Bookmarks
     Named bookmarks can be associated with lines in the buffer.  A bookmark
     is	unset when the bookmarked line is deleted.

     C-x m  associates a bookmark with the line	the cursor is on.

     C-x j  jumps to the line associated with a	bookmark.

   Cutting And Pasting Text To And From	The Clipboard
     The following commands perform cut	and paste operations on	buffer text.
     The deletion commands unset the mark.  The	text on	the clipboard is over-
     written with every	deletion or copy except	when deletion commands are in-
     voked with	a repeat count or when C-k command is invoked multiple times
     in	succession.  In	those situations, the successive deletions are ap-
     pended to form one	item on	the clipboard.	To preserve the	contents of
     the clipboard for later use, it can be pushed onto	a stack.

     C-x C    copies the region	to the clipboard.

     M-c      copies text to the clipboard from	the cursor position to the end
	      of the line.  Suppying a repeat count to this command determines
	      the number of lines copied.  A repeat count of 1 is the same as
	      supplying	no repeat count.  The terminating newline of the last
	      line affected is not copied.

     M-C      copies text to the clipboard from	the cursor position to the end
	      of the current paragraph.	 Supplying a repeat count to this com-
	      mand determines the number a paragraphs from which text is
	      copied.  Supplying a repeat count	of 1 is	the same as supplying
	      no repeat	count.

     C-d      deletes the character under the cursor.

     C-h      deletes the character before the cursor.

     M-d      deletes the word that occur after	the cursor position.

     M-h      deletes the word that is occurs before the cursor.

     C-x C-p  deletes successive whitespace characters from the	cursor loca-
	      tion to the next non-whitespace character	in the current line.
	      The deleted whitespace is	not stored on the clipboard.  The user
	      can restore accidentally-deleted whitespace with the undo	com-
	      mand.

     C-k      deletes the characters in	the line from the cursor position for-
	      ward to the end of the line creating a blank line.  Invoking
	      this command on a	blank line deletes the terminating newline,
	      causing the blank	line to	be removed from	the buffer.  If	this
	      command is given a repeat	count, the command deletes whole
	      lines.  Successive invocations of	this command cause each	sepa-
	      rate deletion to be appended to form one item on the clipboard.

     M-k      deletes the characters from the start of the line	the cursor is
	      on to the	cursor position.

     C-x E    deletes a	sentence forward.

     C-x A    deletes a	sentence backward.

     C-x i    deletes a	paragraph forward

     C-x o    deletes a	paragraph backward.

     C-x w    deletes text forward to the text that matches a regular expres-
	      sion.

     C-x q    deletes text backward to the text	that matches a regular expres-
	      sion.

     C-x K    deletes the text from a specified	bookmark to the	cursor posi-
	      tion.  The book mark is unset after this operation.

     C-x =    deletes text backward in the current line	until the initial
	      whitespace in the	line.

     C-x y    deletes the text from the	cursor position	to the end of the buf-
	      fer.  The	final newline cannot be	deleted.

     C-x u    deletes the text from the	beginning of the buffer	to the cursor
	      position.

     C-x C-d  deletes the text delineated by the region.

     C-y      pastes the content of the	clipboard into the buffer before the
	      cursor position.	The region is set to the inserted text,	so
	      that it may be removed again by invoking C-x C-d,	or M-y.

     M-y      if the region is set, deletes the	region.	 The clipboard stack
	      is rotated and the contents of the next clipboard	are pasted
	      into the buffer.	The region is set to the pasted	text.  Succes-
	      sive invocations allow the user to browse	the contents of	the
	      clipboard	stack.

     M-t      pushes the current clipboard onto	the clipboard stack.

     M-g      replaces the clipboard with the clipboard	on top of the clip-
	      boardstack.

     C-x M-q  Executes M-g, followed by	C-y, to	pop the	clipboard stack	and
	      paste the	new clipboad's content into the	buffer at the cursor
	      location.

     C-x Q    copies the contents of the clipboard on top of the clipboard
	      stack into the current clipboard,	and then pastes	the new	con-
	      tent into	the buffer at the cursor location.  The	clipboard
	      stack is not popped.

   Undoing Modifications To Buffer Content
     Insertions	and deletions may be undone with the undo command.  If the
     last buffer-modifying command invoked was the undo	command, then the redo
     command is	available to allow the undone changes themselves to be undone.
     One can think of the undo operation as moving the buffer back in time,
     and the redo operation moving the buffer forward in time.

     C-u    undoes the last modification to the	buffer.	 Changes to the	buffer
	    occur in a line-oriented manner, so	these changes are undone line-
	    by-line as well.  This means that if you deleted many lines	in the
	    buffer with	one invocation of C-x k, for example, the lines	would
	    be undeleted one at	a time,	by successive invocations of this com-
	    mand, and not all at once.	The undo behaviour of the editor may
	    baffle you at first, but you are merely seeing the changes that go
	    on "behind the scenes," and	if you keep invoking C-u, you will get
	    back to the	buffer state you desire.  This command accepts a re-
	    peat count.

     C-x _  undoes the last undo operation.  This command is only available if
	    the	last modification to the buffer	was performed by an undo oper-
	    ation.  Once fresh changes to the buffer have been made after the
	    undo command has been invoked, the redo information	is discarded.
	    This command accepts a repeat count.

   Searching For Matches On Regular Expressions
     All searches wraparound to	search the portion of the buffer on the	oppo-
     site side of the cursor.  A search	fails if there is no match in the buf-
     fer.

     C-s  searches forward in the buffer for a match of	a regular expression.

     C-r  searches backward in the buffer for a	match of a regular expression.

     M-s  repeats the last search, searching forward in	the buffer.

     M-r  repeats the last search, searching backward in the buffer.

   Transforming	Lines With Regular-Expression-Based Substitutions
     Each of the commands below	performs a regular-expression-based substitu-
     tion over a range of lines	in the buffer.	For each command the user is
     prompted for the pattern, the replacement text, and a repeat count	to
     use.  A repeat count of 0 means to	replace	every occurrence in the	af-
     fected region.  The replacement text can refer to the first ten parenthe-
     sized subexpressions in the pattern by using the escape sequences \1 to
     \0, with \0 referring to the tenth	subexpression.	The text of the	entire
     match can be accessed with	\&.  As	well, \U turns on conversion to	upper-
     case and affects all text from that point forward in the affected line,
     including that portion of the line	outside	the replacement	text.  Simi-
     larly \L turns on conversion to lowercase.	 Either	can be turned off with
     \e.  The two sequences \u and \l convert the single character succeeding
     them to upper or lower case, respectively.	 These commands	are front-ends
     to	the Munger(1) "substitute" intrinsic.  More information	on performing
     substitutions can be found	in the Munger(1) manual	page.

     Terminating newlines are removed from lines when performing substitutions
     so	that "$" matches the empty string before the newline, and "^$" matches
     empty lines.  The terminators are replaced	when the modified lines	are
     written back to the buffer.

     C-x t    performs a substitution on the portion of	the line after the
	      cursor.

     C-x T    performs a substitution on the portion of	the line before	the
	      cursor.

     C-x )    performs a substitution on the paragraph after the cursor	posi-
	      tion.

     C-x (    Performs a substitution on the paragraph preceding cursor	posi-
	      tion.

     C-x S    performs a substitution on the region from the cursor position
	      to the occurrence	of the next match of a specified regular ex-
	      pression in the buffer.

     C-x R    performs a substitution on the region from the match on a	speci-
	      fied regular expression closest to the cursor position, occur-
	      ring before the cursor position, to the cursor position.

     C-x C-r  performs a substitution on the region.

     C-x J    performs a substitution on the region formed between a named
	      bookmark and the cursor location.	 The exact region affected de-
	      pends upon whether the bookmark occurs before or after the cur-
	      sor.

     C-x .    performs a substitution on the region from the cursor position
	      to the end of the	buffer.

     C-x ,    performs a substitution on the region from the start of the buf-
	      fer to the cursor	position.

   Modifying The Indentation Of	Lines
     The following commands alter the indentation of lines in the buffer.  The
     functions that decrease indentation do so by one tab character or the
     equivalent	number of space	characters as determined by the	tabstop	vari-
     able.  Indentation	is assumed to be in increments of this variable, so
     for example, if it	were set to three, then	one tab	or three space charac-
     ters would	be removed from	the start of the affected lines.

     M-z      decreases	the indentation	of lines from the line the cursor is
	      on forward in the	buffer.	 Supplying a repeat count to this com-
	      mand determines the number of lines the command affects.	The
	      default is to affect only	the line the cursor is on.

     M-x      behaves similarly	to the above described command but increases
	      the indentation.

     C-x z    decreases	the paragraph forward from the cursor position.	 Sup-
	      plying a repeat count to this command causes it to affect	n
	      paragraphs.

     C-x x    increases	the indentation	of the paragraph after the cursor po-
	      sition.  Supplying a repeat count	to this	command	causes it to
	      affect n paragraphs.

     C-x C-z  decreases	the indentation	of the paragraph before	the cursor po-
	      sition.  Supplying a repeat count	to this	command	causes it to
	      affect n paragraphs.

     C-x C-x  increases	the indentation	of the paragraph before	the cursor po-
	      sition.  Supplying a repeat count	to this	command	causes it to
	      affect n paragraphs.

     C-x 5    Invokes M-%, to jump to the other	end of a region	delimited by
	      parentheses, brackets, or	braces,	and if successful, decreases
	      the indentation of that range of lines.  This command ignores
	      repeat counts.

     C-x 6    Invokes M-%, to jump to the other	end of a region	delimited by
	      parentheses, brackets, or	braces,	and if successful, increases
	      the indentation of that range of lines, inclusive.  This command
	      ignores repeat counts.

     C-x 7    decreases	the indentation	of the lines in	the region.  This com-
	      mand ignores repeat counts.

     C-x 8    increases	the indentation	of the lines in	the region.  This com-
	      mand ignores repeat counts.

     C-x `    increases	the indentation	of the range of	lines foward from the
	      cursor position to the line containing the next occurrence of a
	      match of a regular expression, Supplying a repeat	count to this
	      command causes it	to affect lines	to the nth next	occurence of
	      the specified regular expression.

     C-x \    decreases	the indentation	of the range of	lines forward from the
	      cursor position to the line containing the next occurrence of a
	      match of a regular expression.  Supplying	a repeat count to this
	      command causes it	to affect lines	to the nth next	occurence of
	      the specified regular expression.

     C-x |    decreases	the indentation	of the range of	lines backward from
	      the cursor position to a match of	a regular expression.  Supply-
	      ing a repeat count to this command causes	it to affect lines to
	      the nth previous occurence of the	regular	expression.

     C-x ~    increases	the indentation	of the range of	lines backward from
	      the cursor position to a match of	a regular expression.  Supply-
	      ing a repeat count to this command causes	it to affect lines to
	      the nth previous occurence of the	regular	expression.

   Altering The	Capitalization Of Words
     M-;  capitalizes the character under the cursor and converts any succeed-
	  ing non-whitespace characters	to lowercase.

     M-"  converts the contiguous non-whitespace characters from the cursor
	  position forward to lowercase.

     M-:  converts the contiguous non-whitespace characters from the cursor
	  position forward to uppercase.

   Reforming Paragraphs	Of Text
     The following commands filter a range of buffer lines through the
     fmt.munger	script,	which is part of the Munger(1) distribution.  Any tabs
     in	the formatted region are expanded, according to	the value of the tab-
     stop variable and their position in the line.  The	maximum	length of for-
     matted lines is determined	by the value of	the line_length	variable.

     M-q      formats the paragraph forward the	cursor position.  Supplying a
	      repeat count to this command causes it to	affect n paragraphs.

     M-w      formats the paragraph backward from the cursor position.	Sup-
	      plying a repeat count to this command causes it to affect	n
	      paragraphs.

     C-q      formats the paragraph forward from the cursor position propagat-
	      ing non-alphabetic prefix	characters, possibly delimited by
	      whitespace on either or both sides.  The prefix is taken from
	      the first	line to	be formatted.  This command is used to format
	      some types of program comments and citations in email messages.
	      Supplying	a repeat count to this command causes it to affect n
	      paragraphs.

     C-w      formats the paragraph backward from the cursor position propa-
	      gating non-alphabetic prefix characters, possibly	delimited by
	      whitespace on either or both sides.  The prefix is taken from
	      the first	line to	be formatted.  This command is used to format
	      some types of program comments and citations in email messages.
	      Supplying	a repeat count to this command causes it to affect n
	      paragraphs.

   Working With	Tags
     The following command can be used to find the location of a toplevel def-
     inition in	program	code, using tags tables.  See ctags(1) for more	infor-
     mation on tags.

     C-x C-g  prompts the user for a symbol name on the	status line.  If the
	      cursor appears to	be on a	symbol in the buffer, that symbol ap-
	      pears on the status line as a default value.  Tag	completion is
	      available	at the prompt and is triggered by pressing the tab
	      key.  The	editor looks up	the symbol the user specifies in the
	      tags file	in the current directory.  If a	tag is found, the edi-
	      tor loads	the appropriate	file and jumps to the location of the
	      definition for that symbol.  The current filename	and cursor po-
	      sition are pushed	onto the file stack and	can be returned	to
	      with the C-x 3 command.

   Evaluating Munger Code
     C-x L    sends the	s-expression immediately before	the cursor position to
	      another munger process for evaluation.  The editor reads and
	      pages the	output.	 The editor complains if it does not receive
	      output immediately.  Any subsequently arriving data is paged by
	      invoking C-x ?.

     C-x ?    displays any output pending.

     C-x C-l  terminates the external munger process.

   Miscellaneous Commands
     C-x s  Causes the editor to remove	trailing contigous whitespace charac-
	    ters from the ends of buffer lines.	 Lines consisting of only
	    whitespace become blank lines.

     M-%    instructs the editor to move the cursor to the location of the de-
	    limiter which matches ("closes") the delimiter character under the
	    cursor.  If	the cursor is not on a "(", ")", "[", "]", "{",	or "}"
	    character, an error	message	is displayed in	the status line.

     C-o    inserts a blank line into the buffer before	the line the cursor is
	    on.

     C-x g  displays the filename associated with the buffer, the cursor posi-
	    tion, and whether or not the buffer	contains unsaved changes.

     C-x V  displays the version of the	editor and the version of Munger on
	    which is it	running.

     C-x C-v
	    displays the number	of words in the	buffer.

     M-i    allows the user to insert any character their keyboard can gener-
	    ate	except the carriage return character (ascii 13), into the buf-
	    fer.

AUTHOR
     James Bailie <jimmy@mammothcheese.ca>
     http://www.mammothcheese.ca

			       January 15, 2021

NAME | SYNOPSIS | DESCRIPTION | AUTHOR

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