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COPYTAPE(1)		    General Commands Manual		   COPYTAPE(1)

NAME
       copytape	- duplicate magtapes

SYNOPSIS
       copytape	f] t] snnn] lnnn] v] ]

DESCRIPTION
       copytape	 duplicates  magtapes.	 It  is	 intended  for	duplication of
       bootable	or other non-file-structured (non-tar-structured) magtapes  on
       systems	with  only one tape drive.  copytape is	blissfully ignorant of
       tape formats.  It merely	makes a	bit-for-bit copy of its	input.

       In normal use, copytape would be	run twice.   First,  a	boot  tape  is
       copied  to  an intermediate disk	file.  The file	is in a	special	format
       that preserves the record boundaries and	tape  marks.   On  the	second
       run,  copytape  reads  this  file and generates a new tape.  The	second
       step may	be repeated if multiple	 copies	 are  required.	  The  typical
       process would look like this:

	    tutorial% copytape /dev/rmt8 tape.tmp
	    tutorial% copytape tape.tmp	/dev/rmt8
	    tutorial% rm tape.tmp

       copytape	 copies	from the standard input	to the standard	output,	unless
       input and output	arguments are provided.	 It will automatically	deter-
       mine  whether  its  input and output are	physical tapes,	or data	files.
       Data files are encoded in a special (human-readable) format.

       Since copytape will automatically determine what	sort of	thing its  in-
       put  and	 output	 are,  a twin-drive system can duplicate a tape	in one
       pass.  The command would	be
	    tutorial% copytape /dev/rmt8 /dev/rmt9

OPTIONS
       -snnn
	  Skip tape marks.  The	specified number of tape marks are skipped  on
	  the  input  tape,  before  the  copy begins.	By default, nothing is
	  skipped, resulting in	a copy of the complete input  tape.   Multiple
	  tar(1)  and dump(1) archives on a single tape	are normally separated
	  by a single tape mark.  On ANSI or IBM labelled tapes, each file has
	  three	associated tape	marks.	Count carefully.

       -lnnn
	  Limit.   Only	nnn files (data	followed by a tape mark), at most, are
	  copied.  This	can be used to terminate a copy	early.	 If  the  skip
	  option is also specified, the	files skipped do not count against the
	  limit.

       -f From tape.  The input	is treated as though it	were a physical	 tape,
	  even	if  it is a data file.	This option can	be used	to copy	block-
	  structured device files other	than magtapes.

       -t To tape.  The	output is treated as though it were a  physical	 tape,
	  even	if it is a data	file.  Normally, data files mark physical tape
	  blocks with a	(human-readable) header	describing the block.  If  the
	  -t  option  is  used	when the output	is actually a disk file, these
	  headers will not be written.	This will extract all the  information
	  from the tape, but copytape will not be able to duplicate the	origi-
	  nal tape based on the	resulting data file.

       -v Verbose.  copytape does not normally produce any output on the  con-
	  trol	terminal.  The verbose option will identify the	input and out-
	  put files, tell whether they are physical tapes or data  files,  and
	  announce  the	 size of each block copied.  This can produce a	lot of
	  output on even relatively short tapes.  It is	 intended  mostly  for
	  diagnostic work.

FILES
       /dev/rmt*

SEE ALSO
       ansitape(1), dd(1), tar(1), mtio(4), copytape(5)

AUTHOR
       David  S.  Hayes, Site Manager, US Army Artificial Intelligence Center.
       Originally developed September 1984 at  Rensselaer  Polytechnic	Insti-
       tute, Troy, New York.  Revised July 1986.  This software	is in the pub-
       lic domain.

BUGS
       copytape	treats two successive file marks as logical end-of-tape.

       The intermediate	data file can consume huge amounts of disk  space.   A
       2400-foot  reel	at  6250-bpi  can  burn	 140  megabytes.   This	is not
       strictly	speaking a bug,	but users should be aware of the  possibility.
       Check disk space	with df(1) before starting copytape.  Caveat Emptor!

       A  256K	buffer is used internally.  This limits	the maximum block size
       of the input tape.

				 25 June 1986			   COPYTAPE(1)

NAME | SYNOPSIS | DESCRIPTION | OPTIONS | FILES | SEE ALSO | AUTHOR | BUGS

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