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AFTERSTEP(1.0)							AFTERSTEP(1.0)

NAME
       afterstep - X11 window manager

SYNOPSIS
       afterstep [-d dpy ] [-debug] [-f	config_file ] [-s]

DESCRIPTION
       AfterStep  is  a	 continuation  of  the BowMan window manager which was
       originally put together by Bo Yang.  BowMan was based on	the fvwm  win-
       dow  manager,  written  by  Robert Nation.  Fvwm	was based on code from
       twm.  And so on...  It is designed to emulate some of the look and feel
       of the NEXTSTEP(tm) user	interface, while adding	useful,	requested, and
       neat features.  The changes which comprise AfterStep's personality were
       originally part of BowMan development, but due to a desire to move past
       simple emulation	and into a niche as its	own valuable  window  manager,
       the  current  designers decided to change the project name and move on.
       BowMan development may continue,	but we will no longer be a part	of it.

       Some major changes from fvwm 1.24 include:
	      1. NEXTSTEP(tm)-alike title bar, title buttons, borders and cor-
	      ners.
	      2.  AfterStep's Wharf is a much worked-out version of GoodStuff.
	      To avoid copyright complications it is not called	a "dock."
	      3. NEXTSTEP(tm) style menus. However  the	 menus	are  not  con-
	      trolled  by  applications, they are more of pop-up service lists
	      on the root window.
	      4. NEXTSTEP(tm) style icons. The default	icons  are  consistent
	      with  those  in the NEXTSTEP(tm) interface, but they are config-
	      urable.

       However,	the flexibility	of fvwm	was not	 traded	 off.  The  initiation
       file,  ~/.steprc	 , recognizes most of the fvwm 1.24r commands. Virtual
       screens and the pager are still intact.	Fvwm(1.24) modules should work
       just fine. However, compatibility with fvwm-2 is	not planned.

SPECIAL	NOTE FOR XFREE86 USERS
       XFree86	provides  a  virtual screen whose operation  can  be confusing
       when used in  conjunction  with	this  virtual  window  manager.	  With
       XFree86,	windows	 which	appear	on  the	virtual	 screen	 actually  get
       drawn into video	memory,	so the	virtual	 screen	 size  is  limited  by
       available video memory.

       With  AfterStep's  virtual  desktop, windows which do not appear	on the
       screen do not actually get drawn	 into  video  RAM.  The	 size  of  the
       virtual	desktop	 is  limited  to  about	32,000 by 32,000 pixels. It is
       probably	impractical to use a virtual desktop more than about  5	 times
       the visible screen in each direction.  Note that	memory usage with  the
       virtual desktop	is  a  function	of  the	 number	of windows  which  ex-
       ist. The	size of	the desktop makes no difference.

       When  becoming  familiar	 with AfterStep	, it is	 recommended  that you
       disable XFree86's virtual screen, by setting the	virtual	screen size to
       the  physical  screen size. When	familiar with AfterStep	, you may want
       to re-enable XFree86's virtual screen.

COPYRIGHTS
       AfterStep is based on BowMan and	shares copyrights with it.  BowMan  is
       derived	from  Fvwm  code, which	is in turn derived from	twm code, thus
       AfterStep shares	copyrights with	Bowman,	Fvwm, and twm.

       AfterStep is copyright 1996 by Frank Fejes,  Alfredo  Kojima,  and  Dan
       Weeks.	All  other modifications are copyright to their	respective au-
       thors.

       Permission to use, copy,	modify,	and distribute this software  and  its
       documentation   for  any	 purpose  and	without	fee is hereby granted,
       provided	that the above copyright notice	appear	 in   all  copies  and
       that   both   that copyright   notice  and  this	 permission notice ap-
       pear in supporting  documentation.

       Please see the file CREDITS included with  the  AfterStep  distribution
       for  the	conditions that	are incumbent on the users of AfterStep	due to
       its relations to	fvwm and twm.

       FRANK FEJES, DAN	WEEKS, AND ALL OTHER CONTRIBUTERS  DISCLAIM  ALL  WAR-
       RANTIES	WITH REGARD TO THIS SOFTWARE, INCLUDING	ALL IMPLIED WARRANTIES
       OF MERCHANTABILITY AND FITNESS, IN NO EVENT SHALL  ANY  CONTRIBUTOR  BE
       LIABLE  FOR  ANY	SPECIAL, INDIRECT OR CONSEQUENTIAL DAMAGES OR ANY DAM-
       AGES WHATSOEVER RESULTING FROM LOSS OF USE, DATA	OR PROFITS, WHETHER IN
       AN ACTION OF CONTRACT, NEGLIGENCE OR OTHER TORTUOUS ACTION, ARISING OUT
       OF OR IN	CONNECTION WITH	THE USE	OR PERFORMANCE OF THIS SOFTWARE.

ANATOMY	OF A WINDOW
       AfterStep puts  a  decorative border on the top and bottom of most win-
       dows.  This border consists of a	bar on the bottom that is divided into
       three sections.	These sections are referred to as "handles".  There is
       also  a	top bar	called the title bar which is used to display the name
       of the window and two title-bar buttons.

       Unless the standard defaults files are modified,	pressing mouse	button
       1  on  the titlebar will	begin a	move operation on the window. Pressing
       button 1	on the bottom handle bar will begin a resize operation.	Press-
       ing  button  2 on either	the titlebar or	the bottom handle brings up an
       extensive list of window	operations.

       The default configuration  has  a title-bar button on each side of  the
       title-bar.  The	one on the left	is used	to iconify the window, regard-
       less  of	 which mouse button is used. The one on	the right is  used  to
       close  the  window,  regardless of which	mouse button is	used.  See the
       section on "Mouse" for more information.	 Further modifications to  Af-
       terStep's   behavior   can   be	made  in  the  ~/.steprc  file,	 using
       /usr/X11R6/lib/X11/afterstep/system.steprc as a guide.

       Shaped windows such as xeyes or oclock get  a  title  bar  that	floats
       above the window	and no bottom bar.  The	background area	of shaped win-
       dows is transparent.  If	you are	tight on memory, you can  disable  the
       SHAPE  extensions  by  modifying	configure.h and	recompiling AfterStep.
       This way	shaped windows get a solid color background and	you save about
       60 kbytes of memory when	no shaped windows are present.

THE VIRTUAL DESKTOP
       AfterStep  provides multiple virtual desktops for users who wish	to use
       them. The screen	is a viewport onto a desktop which is larger than  (or
       the  same size as) the screen.  Several distinct	desktops  can	be ac-
       cessed. Concept:	one desktop for	each  project,	or  one	 desktop   for
       each   application,  when  view	applications are distinct.  Since each
       desktop can be larger than the  physical	 screen,  windows  which   are
       larger  than  the  screen, or large groups of related windows, can eas-
       ily be viewed.

       The size	of the each virtual desktop must  be  specified	  at  start-up
       (default:   2   times  the  physical  size  of the screen). All virtual
       desktops	must be	the same  size.	 The total  number  of distinct	 desk-
       tops  need  not be specified, but is limited to approximately 4 billion
       total. All windows on the current desktop can be	displayed in a	Pager,
       or  miniature  view or the current desktop.  Windows  which are	not on
       the current desktop can be listed, along	with their  geometries,	 in  a
       window list, accessible as a pop-up menu.

       "Sticky"	 windows   are	windows	which transcend	the virtual desktop by
       "Sticking to the	screen's glass."  They	 always	 stay	put   on   the
       screen.	 This is convenient for	things like clocks and xbiff's,	so you
       only need to run	one  such gadget, and it always	stays with you.

       Window  geometries  are specified relative  to  the  current  viewport.
       That  is, xterm -geometry +0+0, will always show	up in  the  upper-left
       hand corner of the visible portion of the screen. It is permissible  to
       specify	geometries   which  place  windows on the virtual desktop, but
       off the screen.	For example, if	the visible screen  is	1000  by  1000
       pixels,	and   the  desktop size	is 3x3,	and the	current	viewport is at
       the upper left hand corner of the desktop, then	invoking xterm -geome-
       try  +1000+1000	will place the window just off of the lower right hand
       corner of the screen.  It  can be  found	by moving  the	mouse  to  the
       lower  right  hand  corner  of the screen, and waiting for it to	scroll
       into view.  There  is currently no way to cause a window	to map onto  a
       desktop	other than the currently active	desk.  A geometry specified as
       something  like xterm -geometry -5-5 will  generally  place   the  win-
       dows lower right	hand corner 5 pixels from the lower right hand	corner
       of  the visible	portion	of the screen. Not  all	 applications  support
       window geometries with negative offsets.

       Some  applications, like	xterm and xfontsel, allow the user to  specify
       the start-up desk on the	command	line. xterm -xrm "*Desk:1" will	 start
       an  xterm  on  desk number 1. Other applications	do not understand this
       option.

INITIALIZATION
       During  initialization, AfterStep will search for a configuration  file
       which describes key and button bindings,	and a few  other  things.  The
       format  of these	 files will be described later.	First, AfterStep  will
       search for a file  named	.steprc	in the user's home directory.  Failing
       that, it	will look for /usr/lib/X11/afterstep/system.steprc for system-
       wide defaults. If that file is not found, AfterStep will	exit.

       AfterStep  will	 set  two  environment	variables which	will be	inher-
       ited  by	 its  children.	 These	are  $DISPLAY	which  describes   the
       display	on  which  AfterStep  is  running. $DISPLAY may	be unix:0.0 or
       :0.0, which doesn't work	too well  when passed  through	 rsh   to  an-
       other  machine,	so  $HOSTDISPLAY will also be set, and will use	a net-
       work-ready description of   the	display.  Unfortunately,  $HOSTDISPLAY
       will  use the tcp/ip transport protocol,	even for a  local  connection,
       so  $DISPLAY  should  be	used for local	connections,  as  it  may  use
       unix-domain sockets, which are faster.

ICONS
       By  default,  AfterStep is compiled with	XPM extensions which allow one
       to use color icons similar to those in  NEXTSTEP(tm),  ctwm,  Microsoft
       Windows,	 or  the  Macintosh.   In order	to use these options, you will
       need   the   XPM	   package,    which   should	be    available	   at:
       ftp://ftp.x.org/contrib/libraries.   XPM	extensions can be removed from
       AfterStep if one	wants to have monochrome icons and doesn't want	pixmap
       tiled titlebars,	etc.

MODULES
       A   module   is	 a  separate  program,	which  runs as a separate unix
       process,	but transmits commands to AfterStep to execute.	 These modules
       get  many kinds of window information from AfterStep.  Users can	 write
       their  own  modules  to	do any weird or	bizarre	manipulations, without
       affecting the integrity of AfterStep itself.

       Modules	MUST be	spawned	by AfterStep, (i.e. not	executed from the com-
       mand line) so that AfterStep can	set up two pipes used  for  communica-
       tion  between  the module and AfterStep.	 Modules can be	spawned	during
       AfterStep initialization	via  the Module	 option, or at any time	during
       the X session by	use of the Module built-in function. Modules can exist
       for the duration	of  the	X session, or can perform a  single  task  and
       exit.

       If a module is still active when	AfterStep is told  to  quit, AfterStep
       will close down the communication pipes,	and wait to receive a  SIGCHLD
       from the	module,	indicating that	it  has	detected the pipe closure, and
       has exited. If modules fail to detect the pipe closure, AfterStep  will
       exit  after  approximately  30 seconds anyway. The number of simultane-
       ously executing modules is limited by the  operating  system's  maximum
       number of simultaneously	open files, usually between 60 and 256.

       Modules are documented in their own manual pages.

ICCCM COMPLIANCE
       AfterStep  attempts   to	  be  ICCCM  2.0  compliant.  As of this (1.0)
       release,	colormap handling is not completely ICCCM compliant.  In addi-
       tion,  ICCCM  states that it should be possible for applications	to re-
       ceive ANY keystroke,  which  is	not  consistent	  with	the   keyboard
       shortcut	 approach  used	 in  AfterStep and most	other window managers.
       The user	can disable any	AfterStep keystroke that should	be  passed  to
       the application and not intercepted by the window manager.

M4 PREPROCESSING
       If  AfterStep  is  compiled with	the M4 option, AfterStep uses m4(1) to
       preprocess its setup files before parsing. This	way  you  can  use  m4
       macros  to  perform  operations at runtime.  This makes it very easy to
       work with different displays with different characteristics.

       For example, depending on your mood, you	 might	want  different	 color
       schemes.	  One way of doing this	is by using the	-m4opt to specify your
       mood.  For a sunny mood use -m4opt -DSunny; for a dark mood use	-m4opt
       -DDark.	Your .steprc file might	then contain:

       ifdef(`Sunny',`
       StdForeColor	       Black
       StdBackColor	       LightSkyBlue
       HiForeColor	       yellow
       HiBackColor	       PeachPuff1
       PagerBackColor	       BlanchedAlmond ')

       ifdef(`Dark',`
       StdForeColor	       Black
       StdBackColor	       #60a0c0
       HiForeColor	       black
       HiBackColor	       #c06077
       PagerBackColor	       #5c54c0
       PagerForeColor	       orchid
       StickyForeColor	       Black
       StickyBackColor	       #60c0a0 ')

       The following m4	symbols	are predefined by AfterStep:

       BITS_PER_RGB	       The number of significant bits in an RGB	color.
			       (log base 2 of the number  of  distinct	colors
			       that  can  be created.  This is often different
			       from the	number of colors that can be displayed
			       at once.)

       CLASS		       Your  visual  class.   Will return one of Stat-
			       icGray,	GrayScale,  StaticColor,  PseudoColor,
			       TrueColor, DirectColor, or, if it cannot	deter-
			       mine what you have, NonStandard.

       CLIENTHOST	       The machine that	is running the clients.

       COLOR		       This will be either 'Yes'  or  'No'.   This  is
			       just  a	wrapper	 around	 the CLASS definition.
			       Returns 'Yes' on	*Color and 'No'	on  StaticGray
			       and GrayScale.

       AFTERDIR		       This  is	set to the path	where the modules were
			       configured to be	installed.

       AFTER_VERSION	       This is a string	containing the version of  Af-
			       terStep.

       HEIGHT		       The height of your display in pixels.

       HOME		       The  user's  home directory.  Obtained from the
			       environment.

       HOSTNAME		       The canonical hostname running the clients (ie.
			       a fully-qualified version of CLIENTHOST).

       OPTIONS		       This  is	a string of compile time options used.
			       Each option is separated	from the  other	 by  a
			       space.

       PLANES		       The  number of bit planes your display supports
			       in the default root window.

       RELEASE		       The release number of your X server.   For  MIT
			       X11R5 this is 5.

       REVISION		       The X minor protocol revision.  As seen by Pro-
			       tocolRevision(3).

       SERVERHOST	       This variable is	set to the name	of the machine
			       that is running the X server.

       TWM_TYPE		       Tells  which  twm offshoot is running.  It will
			       always be set to	the string "afterstep" in this
			       program.	  This	is useful for protecting parts
			       of your .twmrc file that	AfterStep proper won't
			       understand  (like  WorkSpaces)  so  that	 it is
			       still usable with other twm programs.

       USER		       The name	of the user running the	program.   Ob-
			       tained from the environment.

       VENDOR		       The  vendor of your X server.  For example: MIT
			       X Consortium.

       VERSION		       The X major protocol version.  As seen by  Pro-
			       tocolVersion(3).

       WIDTH		       The width of your display in pixels.

       X_RESOLUTION	       The  X resolution of your display in pixels per
			       meter.

       Y_RESOLUTION	       The Y resolution	of your	display	in pixels  per
			       meter.

       You may well find that if you research the m4(1)	manual well and	under-
       stand the power of m4, this will	be a very useful  and  powerful	 tool.
       But  if	you use	any of the symbols which are predefined	by m4, you are
       in severe danger!  For example, Sun's m4	predefines include, so if  you
       use  that name in your .steprc, you are out of luck.  The correct solu-
       tion to this problem is to put a	set of quotes around  the  troublesome
       word:  `include'.

       To  help	 alleviate  this problem, the following	options	may be useful.
       To change the quoting characters	used by	m4, use	the options -m4-squote
       and  -m4-equote.	  Be sure to specify both options otherwise m4 will be
       confused.  When these are given,	a changequote macro  is	 given	before
       the users steprc	file is	processed.

       NOTE:  Some  versions of	m4 are broken with respect to changing quoting
       characters and included files.  When the	 quoting  strings  are	longer
       than  one character, the	macro "include(<<file>>)", where "<<" and ">>"
       are the quoting characters, contains extra characters around  the  con-
       tents  of the included file.  This will confuse AfterStep.  SunOS 4.1.3
       is known	to have	this problem.

       If you are using	GNU m4 an additional option is available.  By specify-
       ing  -m4-prefix when starting AfterStep,	m4 is instructed to prefix all
       builtin macros with m4_.	 Thus, include becomes m4_include.

       The availability	of the m4 preprocessing	is subject to the  compilation
       define M4, which	is commented out in the	configure.h as distributed.

OPTIONS
       -d displayname
	      Manage   the  display called, "displayname", instead of the name
	      obtained from the	environment variable $DISPLAY.

       -debug

	      Puts X transactions  in  synchronous  mode,  which  dramatically
	      slows  things down, but guarantees that AfterStep's internal er-
	      ror messages are correct.

       -f config_file
	      Causes AfterStep to use config_file instead of ~/.steprc as  the
	      window manager configuration file.

       -s     Run  AfterStep  on  only	the specified screen of	a multi-screen
	      display.	Normally, AfterStep will attempt to start  up  on  all
	      screens  of  a  multi-screen display.  The "specified screen" is
	      the one provided in the DISPLAY environment  variable,  or  pro-
	      vided through the	-d option.

CONFIGURATION OPTIONS
       The  configuration  file, usually ~/.steprc , is	used to	describe mouse
       and button bindings, colors, the	 virtual  display  size,  and  related
       items.  This section describes the configuration	options.  Lines	within
       the configuration file beginning	with '#' will be ignored by AfterStep.
       Lines  starting	with  '*' are expected to contain module configuration
       commands.

       StdForeColor colorname
	      Sets  the	foreground   color   for   menus    and	  non-selected
	      window   titles  to  colorname.  When using a monochrome screen,
	      this  option  is	ignored, and black is used.

       StdBackColor colorname
	      Sets  the	background  color  for	menus,	and non-selected  win-
	      dows  to	colorname.  When using a monochrome  screen,  this op-
	      tion  is	ignored, and white is used.

       StickyForeColor colorname
	      Sets the	foreground  color  for	 non-selected	window	sticky
	      (Sticks-to-glass)	 titles	to colorname.  When using a monochrome
	      screen, this option is ignored, and black	is used.

       StickyBackColor colorname
	      Sets the	background  color  for	 non-selected	window	sticky
	      (Sticks-to-glass)	windows	to colorname.  When using a monochrome
	      screen, this option is ignored, and  white is used.

       HiForeColor colorname
	      Sets the color for selected window's title to  colorname.	  When
	      using  a monochrome screen, this option is ignored, and black is
	      used.  Note that this currently also  controls  the  menu	 high-
	      lights,  popup  menu  titles and the icon	title font.  This is a
	      "feature."

       HiBackColor colorname
	      Sets the background color	for the	selected window	to  colorname.
	      When  using  a  monochrome  screen,  this	option is ignored, and
	      white is used.  Note that	this also controls the IconTitle back-
	      ground color.

       MenuForeColor colorname
	      Sets the menu foreground color.  When using monochrome, this op-
	      tion is ignored.

       MenuBackColor colorname
	      Sets the menu background color.  When using monochrome, this op-
	      tion is ignored.

       MenuStippleColor	colorname
	      Sets  the	 color	for shaded out entries in menus	(for functions
	      which  are  not allowed  on  the	currently  selected   window).
	      When  using  monochrome,	 this option  is  ignored, and a stip-
	      ple pattern is used.

       MenusHigh
	      Makes the	popup menu submenus appear at the top  of  the	parent
	      menu instead of starting at the point in the parent window where
	      the submenu item lies.

       PagerBackColor colorname
	      Causes the pager background color	to be colorname	,  instead  of
	      white.  On  a monochrome	screen,	 this option  is  ignored.  If
	      the NO_PAGER option is set when building AfterStep , this	option
	      is unavailable.

       PagerForeColor colorname
	      Causes  the pager	foreground color to be colorname , instead  of
	      black.  This is the color	used to	high- light the	current	 view-
	      port  in	the pager window.  On a	monochrome screen, this	option
	      is ignored. If the NO_PAGER option is set	 when  building	After-
	      Step ,  this option is unavailable.

       PagerFont fontname
	      Makes AfterStep use the font fontname instead of "fixed" for the
	      pager labels.

       TextureTypes focusedtitle unfocusedtitle	stickytitle menutitle menuitem
	      Specifies	the type of gradient fill to be	used on	 each  of  the
	      above  parts  of	the AfterStep windows.	Currently valid	values
	      are:
	      0	- No texture
	      1	- Wharf-style gradient
	      2	- Horizontal one way gradient
	      3	- Horizontal cylindrical gradient
	      4	- Vertical one way gradient
	      5	- Vertical cylindrical gradient
	      128 - User specified pixmap (See TitlePixmap, etc)
	      The entry	from the included sample.steprc	is TextureTypes	1 1  1
	      1	 1.   This makes all gradients fill from the upper left	to the
	      lower right with your specified colors.

       TextureMaxColors	title unfocusedtitle stickytitle menutitle menuitem
	      The number of colors to use on textures.	Default	is TextureMax-
	      Colors  10 10 10 10 10 on	8 bpp screens and TextureMaxColors 128
	      128 128 128 128 on 16+ bpp screens. The actual number  of	 allo-
	      cated  colors  may  be lower.  You must at least specify a value
	      for title.

       TitleTextureColor from to
	      Colors that the gradient will go from and	to when	gradients  are
	      drawn  in	a window titlebar.  The	default	values for from	and to
	      are #101030 and  #303080 respectively.  Values must be in	either
	      standard X color names or	hex notation.

       UTitleTextureColor from to
	      Colors  that the gradient	will go	from and to when gradients are
	      drawn in a non-focused window titlebar.  The default values  for
	      from  and	to are #86868a and  #c0b6c3 respectively.  Values must
	      be in either standard X color names or hex notation.

       STitleTextureColor from to
	      Colors that the gradient will go from and	to when	gradients  are
	      drawn  in	a sticky window	titlebar.  The default values for from
	      and to are #86868a and #c0b6c3 respectively.  Values must	be  in
	      either standard X	color names or hex notation.

       MenuTextureColor	from to
	      Colors  that the gradient	will go	from and to when gradients are
	      drawn on the menu	entries.  The default values for from  and  to
	      are #101030 and  #404090 respectively.  Values must be in	either
	      standard X color names or	hex notation.

       MTitleTextureColor from to
	      Colors that the gradient will go from and	to when	gradients  are
	      drawn  for  menu titles.	The default values for from and	to are
	      #101030 and  #303080 respectively.  Values  must	be  in	either
	      standard X color names or	hex notation.

       TitlePixmap xpmname
	      If  the  TextureType of the focused titlebar is set to 128, this
	      command causes the xpm defined by	xpmname	to be tiled in the ti-
	      tlebar  instead  of  a  solid color or a gradient	texture.  Note
	      that the titlebar	by default can show a pixmap of	up to 19  pix-
	      els  in  height,	though	it may be of any length.  One need not
	      specify the complete path	if the xpm is in the directory defined
	      by PixmapPath.

       UTitlePixmap xpmname
	      If  the  TextureType  of unfocused titlebars is set to 128, this
	      command causes the xpm defined by	xpmname	to be tiled in the ti-
	      tlebar  instead  of  a  solid color or a gradient	texture.  Note
	      that the titlebar	by default can show a pixmap of	up to 19  pix-
	      els  in  height,	though	the  xpm  graphic may be of any	actual
	      height and length.  The full path	to the xpm is not required  if
	      it is in the directory defined by	PixmapPath.

       STitlePixmap xpmname
	      If  the TextureType of sticky titlebars is set to	128, this com-
	      mand causes the xpm defined by xpmname to	be tiled in the	title-
	      bar  of  sticky  windows	instead	of a solid color or a gradient
	      texture.	Note that the titlebar by default can show a pixmap of
	      up  to 19	pixels in height, though the xpm graphic may be	of any
	      actual height and	length.	 The full path to the xpm is  not  re-
	      quired if	it is in the directory defined by PixmapPath.

       TexturedHandle
	      Turns  on	 textures  for all window handles.  The	handle texture
	      will be the same as the texture used in the window's titlebar.

       GradientText
	      Causes a gradient	to be applied to the titlebar text of the  fo-
	      cused  window.   The gradient colors are set using TextGradient-
	      Color.

       TextGradientColor from to
	      Colors that the gradient will go from and	to when	gradients  are
	      drawn for	the titlebar text.  The	default	values for from	and to
	      are #101030 and  #303080 respectively.  Values must be in	either
	      standard X color names or	hex notation.

       TitleTextAlign num
	      Defines  the alignment of	the window title in the	titlebar.  The
	      allowable	values for num are as follows:
	      1: left aligned
	      2: right aligned
	      3: center	aligned	(default)

       TitlebarNoPush
	      Causes the titlebar not to appear	to be  "pushed	in"  when  you
	      click on it with a mouse button.	This is	useful to reduce video
	      strain or	if you use textured pixmaps  that  do  not  look  good
	      "pushed in."

       TitleButton num xpmname
	      Defines  the  pixmaps to use instead of the default NEXTSTEP(tm)
	      style titlebar buttons that are the default.  Up	to  8  buttons
	      are  possible.   num specifies the position of the button	on the
	      window and is an integer from 1-8.  The positions	are  indicated
	      as below:
	      1	3 5 7	TitleBarText  8	6 4 2
	      Note that	you must bind an action	to any new buttons you add us-
	      ing the Mouse definitions.  The pixmap defined by	xpmname	should
	      be exactly 10x10 pixels to fit inside the	gray button bevel.

       Font fontname
	      Makes  AfterStep	use  the  font fontname	instead	of "fixed" for
	      menus, the resize	indicators, and	icon  labels  (if IconFont  is
	      not specified).

       WindowFont fontname
	      Makes AfterStep use the font fontname instead of "fixed" for the
	      window title bar.

       NoTitle windowname
	      Keeps AfterStep from putting a titlebar in the  decorations  for
	      windows  named windowname.  This	is  handy for clocks and simi-
	      lar gadgets that you don't want to  take	up  too	 much	space.
	      windowname can be	a window's name	or its class.

	      Windowname  can  contain	the wildcards "*" and "?"  which match
	      window names in the normal  unix	filename matching  manner: "*"
	      matches  any number of any character and "?"  matches one	of any
	      character.  Actual "*", "?", and "\" characters in a window name
	      can be entered by	 preceding the character with a	"\".

       Sticky windowname
	      Sticky  windows  "stick  to the screen's glass."	That is,  they
	      don't move the the viewport into the  virtual  desktop  changes.
	      windowname can be	a window's name	or its class.  See NoTitle for
	      a	discussion of the windowname parameter.

       StaysOnTop windowname
	      These   windows  always  try  to stay on top of the  other  win-
	      dows.  This  might  be handy  for	 clocks	 or mailboxes that you
	      would always like	to be visible.	If the	window	is  explicitly
	      lowered,	 it  will  not try  to	force  its way back to the top
	      until it is explicitly raised.  windowname can  be   a  window's
	      name  or	its class. See NoTitle for a discussion	of the window-
	      name parameter.

       StartsOnDesk windowname desk-number
	      This  command causes windows whose name or class	is  windowname
	      to be initially placed on	desktop	number desk-number. windowname
	      should be	enclosed in double quotes.  If	the  window   requires
	      interactive  placement, an outline will be displayed on the cur-
	      rent desk, but the window	will appear  on	 the  specified	 desk.
	      See NoTitle for a	discussion of the windowname parameter.

       CirculateSkip windowname
	      Causes  windows  with  the  indicated  name  to  be skipped over
	      when the	CirculateUp,  CirculateDown  or	 Warp  functions   are
	      invoked.	 windowname  can be a window's name or its class.  See
	      NoTitle for a discussion of the windowname parameter.

       CirculateSkipIcons
	      Causes circulate and warp	operations to	skip   over  iconified
	      windows.

       WindowListSkip windowname
	      Causes   windows	 with the indicated name to be left out	of the
	      window list.  See	NoTitle	for a discussion of the	windowname pa-
	      rameter.

       NoFocus windowname
	      Causes   windows	 with the indicated name to not	take the focus
	      when the pointer moves over them in focus-follows-mouse (the de-
	      fault) mode, or when the window is clicked in ClickToFocus mode.
	      See NoTitle for a	discussion of the windowname parameter.

       Style windowname	options
	      This command is intended	to   replace   the  commands  NoFocus,
	      NoBorder,	NoTitle,  StartsOnDesk,	Sticky,	StaysOnTop, Icon, Win-
	      dowListSkip,   CirculateSkip,   SuppressIcons,	BoundaryWidth,
	      NoBoundaryWidth,	StdForeColor,  and  StdBackColor with a	single
	      flexible and comprehensive command.  This	command	is used	to set
	      attributes  of a window to values	 other than the	default, or to
	      set the  window-manager default styles.  windowname can	be   a
	      window's	 name,	 class	 or resource  string. It  can  contain
	      the wildcards "*"	and/or "?", which are  matched	in  the	 usual
	      unix  filename  manner.	options	is a comma separated list con-
	      taining all or some of the  keywords  BorderWidth,  HandleWidth,
	      NoFocus,	Icon/NoIcon,  NoTitle/Title,  NoHandles/Handles,  Win-
	      dowListSkip/WindowListHit, CirculateSkip/CirculateHit,  StaysOn-
	      Top/StaysPut,  Sticky/Slippery,  StartIconic/StartNormal,	Color,
	      ForeColor, BackColor, StartsOnDesk/StartsAnyWhere,  and  IconTi-
	      tle/NoIconTitle.

	      In  the  above   list,   some options  are  listed  as style-op-
	      tion/opposite-style-option.  The	opposite-style-option for  en-
	      tries  that  have	 them  describes the default behavior, and can
	      be used if you want to change the	default	behavior.

	      Icon takes an (optional) unquoted	string	argument which	is the
	      icon  bitmap or pixmap to	use.  StartsOnDesk takes a numeric ar-
	      gument which is the desktop number on which the window should be
	      initially	placed.	 BorderWidth takes a numeric argument which is
	      the width	of the border to place the window if it	does not  have
	      resize-handles.	HandleWidth  takes a numeric argument which is
	      the height of the	bottom bar to place with the window if it  has
	      resize handles.

	      Color  takes two arguments. The first is the window label's text
	      color, and the second is the window  decoration's	 normal	 back-
	      ground  color.   The  two	colors are separated with a slash.  If
	      the use of a slash causes	 problems, then	the separate ForeColor
	      and BackColor options can	be used.

	      An example:

	      #	Change default AfterStep behavior to no	titlebars on windows!
	      #	Also, define a default icon.
	      Style "*"	NoTitle,Icon unknown1.xpm,BorderWidth 4,HandleWidth 5

	      #	now, window specific changes:
	      Style "Fvwm*"	 NoHandles,Sticky,WindowListSkip
	      #	the above line is for those that use Fvwm
	      #	modules	with AfterStep
	      Style "Pager"	 StaysOnTop
	      Style "*clock"	 NoHandles,Sticky,StaysOnTop,WindowListSkip
	      Style "xbiff"	 Sticky,WindowListSkip
	      Style "Wharf"	 NoHandles,Sticky,WindowListSkip
	      Style "sxpm"	 NoHandles

	      #	Put title-bars back on xterms only!
	      Style "xterm"	 Title,	Color black/grey
	      Style "rxvt"	 Icon term.xpm
	      Style "xterm"	 Icon rterm.xpm
	      Style "xcalc"	 Icon xcalc.xpm
	      Style "xbiff"	 Icon mail1.xpm
	      Style "xmh"	 Icon mail1.xpm, StartsOnDesk 2
	      Style "xman"	 Icon xman.xpm
	      Style "matlab"	 Icon math4.xpm, StartsOnDesk 3
	      Style "xmag"	 Icon magnifying_glass2.xpm
	      Style "xgraph"	 Icon graphs.xpm
	      Style "Maker"	 StartsOnDesk 1
	      Style "signal"	 StartsOnDesk 3

	      Note  that all properties	for a window will be read together. In
	      the above	example	"Pager"	gets the property  StaysOnTop  via  an
	      exact  window  name  match, but  also gets NoHandles,Sticky, and
	      WindowListSkip by	a match	to "AfterStep*".  It  will get	 NoTi-
	      tle   by	virtue	of  a  match to	"*". If	conflicting styles are
	      specified	for a window, then the last style  specified  will  be
	      used.

	      If   the NoIcon attribute	is set,	then the specified window will
	      simply disappear when it is  iconified.  The   window   can   be
	      recovered	 through  the  window list.  If	Icon is	set without an
	      argument,	then  the NoIcon  attribute is cleared,	but no icon is
	      specified.  An example which allows  only	 the Pager module icon
	      to exist:

	      Style "*"	NoIcon
	      Style "Pager" Icon

       CenterOnCirculate
	      When  circulating,  the desktop page containing the window which
	      the  pointer  is	moving to is  automatically selected.  If Cen-
	      terOnCirculate is	selected, then AfterStep will do its best   to
	      center   the   target  window  in	 the  desktop viewport,	rather
	      than just	lining up to the closest page.

       DeskTopSize HorizontalxVertical
	      Defines the virtual desktop size in units	of the physical	screen
	      size.

       DeskTopScale Scale
	      Defines  the  virtual desktop scale with respect to the screen.

       BoundaryWidth Width
	      Changes  the  bottom bar (handle)	size (in pixels) on windows to
	      the specified value.  The	default	size is	8.

       NoBoundaryWidth Width
	      Changes the width	of the bottom bar (handle) for windows with no
	      titles  and  no resize corners.  The default is 0.  Any positive
	      or zero value is acceptable.  The	handles	without	resize corners
	      have the same mouse and keyboard bindings	as the handles on nor-
	      mal windows.

       XORvalue	number
	      Changes the value	with which bits	are  XOR'ed  when doing	  rub-
	      ber-band	 window	 moving	 or  resizing. Setting this value is a
	      trial-and-error process.

       EdgeScroll horizontal vertical
	      Specifies	the percentage of a page to  scroll  when the	cursor
	      hits  the	 edge  of  a  page.  If	 you  don't want any paging or
	      scrolling	when you hit the  edge of  a  page, include EdgeScroll
	      0	 0  in	your .steprc file. If you want whole pages, use	 Edge-
	      Scroll  100 100.	Both  horizontal and vertical should be	 posi-
	      tive numbers.

	      If  the  horizontal  and	vertical percentages are multiplied by
	      1000, then scrolling will	wrap around at the edge	of  the	 desk-
	      top.   If	 "EdgeScroll  100000 100000"  is  used,	AfterStep will
	      scroll by	whole pages, wrapping around at	the edge of the	 desk-
	      top.

       PagingDefault pagingdefaultvalue
	      Tells  AfterStep	if  it	should	start up  with	paging enabled
	      or disabled.  "PagingDefault 0" will start AfterStep with	paging
	      disabled,	 "PagingDefault	 1"   will start AfterStep with	paging
	      enabled by default.

       EdgeResistance scrolling	moving
	      Tells  how  hard it should be to change the desktop viewport  by
	      moving the mouse over the	edge  of  the screen,  and how hard it
	      should be	to move	a window over the edge of the screen.

	      The first	parameter   tells   how	   milliseconds	  the  pointer
	      must   spend  on	the screen edge	before AfterStep will move the
	      viewport.	This is	intended for people who	 use  EdgeScroll   100
	      100,  but	find themselves	accidentally flipping pages when  they
	      don't  want to.

	      The second parameter tells how many pixels over the edge of  the
	      screen  a	 window's edge must move before	it actually moves par-
	      tially off the screen.

	      Note  that, with EdgeScroll 0 0, it is still possible to move or
	      resize  windows  across	the  edge  of the  current  screen. By
	      making the first parameter to EdgeResistance 10000,  this	  type
	      of   motion   is	impossible.   With  EdgeResistances  less than
	      10000, but greater than 0, moving	over pages becomes   difficult
	      but not impossible.

       OpaqueMove percentage
	      Tells  AfterStep	the   maximum  size  window  with which	opaque
	      window movement should be	used. The percentage is	  percent   of
	      the  total   screen area.	With OpaqueMove	0, all windows will be
	      moved   using   the  traditional	 rubber-band   outline.	  With
	      OpaqueMove  100,	all windows will be move as solid windows. The
	      default  is OpaqueMove 5 which allows small windows to be	 moved
	      in  an  opaque manner, but large	windows	to be moved as rubber-
	      bands.  Using this option	with large values can slow  down  your
	      video response on	slower systems.

       ClickToFocus [flag]
	      Normally	keyboard input goes to the window the mouse pointer is
	      in. If this option is set, the keyboard input (aka focus)	 stays
	      with one window until a new window is clicked on.

	      If  the (optional) flag is given a nonzero value,	a mouse	button
	      click that changes the keyboard focus is	caught	and  processed
	      only  by	AfterStep.  If the flag	is zero, or is not supplied, a
	      click that changes the focus is passed through for the  applica-
	      tion to process.

	      When the flag is nonzero,	it is useful to	assign a NoFocus style
	      to all applications that	are  entirely  mouse-controlled	 (e.g.
	      Wharf).

       SloppyFocus
	      This  option  changes the	way focus-follows-mouse	(the AfterStep
	      default) mode behaves when the mouse  pointer  enters  the  root
	      window  (that  is, the background	area).	Normally, the keyboard
	      focus would disappear at this stage, but when SloppyFocus	is on,
	      exiting  a  window to enter the root window leaves the focus un-
	      changed.	The focus will not be removed from the last (non-root)
	      window you visited until the mouse pointer enters	a new window.

	      SloppyFocus has no effect	in ClickToFocus	mode.

       ClickToRaise buttons
	      In  focus-follows-mouse  mode, ClickToRaise specifies mouse but-
	      tons that	raise a	partially obscured window to the  top.	 On  a
	      window  that  is fully visible (except a normal window may still
	      be below StaysOnTop windows) all the mouse buttons  behave  nor-
	      mally.   Please note that	in most	applications you can use mouse
	      buttons in combination with the shift key	to  avoid  the	Click-
	      ToRaise behavior when needed.

	      In click-to-focus	mode, ClickToRaise specifies the mouse buttons
	      that raise an unfocused window to	the  top.   The	 rest  of  the
	      mouse  buttons merely change the focus without raising, although
	      you can have them	do delayed raising with	the AutoRaise  command
	      or the Auto module.

	      In  both focusing	modes, ClickToRaise is not triggered on	window
	      decorations such as the title bar, but only on  the  application
	      area.

	      The  mouse  buttons  are numbered	as in the Button command.  You
	      can specify any or all of	your mouse buttons here	as a space- or
	      comma-separated list.

       OpaqueResize
	      Causes  resize operations	to be done with	the window itself, in-
	      stead of an outline.  Using this option  does  not  always  work
	      well on slower video systems.

       DontMoveOff
	      Prevents	windows	 from being moved off or  initially placed off
	      of the desktop.  A few programs will not work correctly  if  you
	      use  this	  option.  This	 only keeps  windows  from  being com-
	      pletely lost off the edge	of the desktop.	It insists on  keeping
	      16   pixels on  the  desktop, but	doesn't	care a bit about keep-
	      ing the whole window on the desk.	 See   EdgeResistance  if  you
	      don't like having	windows	partially off the screen.

       AutoRaise delay
	      This built-in was	replaced by the	module Auto(1).

       Pager X_Location	Y_Location
	      Enables a	paging style of	moving across  the  desktop.  A	 Pager
	      window  will appear at ( X_Location, Y_Location )	 (not  a  pop-
	      up).  Miniature	versions   of  all  the	windows	on the virtual
	      desktop are shown	in the pager.  The color of the	miniature ver-
	      sion   is	  the same as the color	of the full-size window's bor-
	      der.

	      In the Pager window, pressing mouse button  1   will  move   the
	      desktop  viewport	 to the	selected page (in click-to-focus mode,
	      it will also move	the keyboard focus  to the window whose	minia-
	      ture  you	 click	on).   Pressing	 button	 2 on a	window	in the
	      pager  will begin	a window move, using the miniature to  quickly
	      move the window anywhere on the desktop.	Pressing button	3 will
	      move the top-left	corner of the viewport to the location of  the
	      button  press,  even  if it does not line	up with	a page.	 Drag-
	      ging button 3 will cause the selected  viewport  to  scroll   as
	      you  move	  the  pointer.	 The Pager   is	 automatically sticky,
	      but does not automatically StayOnTop.

       Mouse Button Context Modifiers Function
	      Defines a	mouse binding.	Button is the mouse button number.  If
	      Button   is   zero,  then	 any button will perform the specified
	      function.	 Context describes in what  context  the  binding  ap-
	      plies.  Valid  contexts  are  R for the root window,  W  for  an
	      application window,  T  for  a window title bar, S for a	window
	      titlebar,	 or  bottom bar, F for a window	frame (the handle cor-
	      ners), I for an Icon window, or any combination  of  these  let-
	      ters.   1	 is for	the left title-bar button and 2	is for the ti-
	      tle-bar button A	is  for	any context except for title-bar  but-
	      tons. For	instance, a context of FST will	 apply when  the mouse
	      is anywhere in a window's	border,	except the title-bar buttons.

	      Modifiers	is any combination of N	for no modifiers, C for	  con-
	      trol,   S	for shift, M for Meta, or A for	any modifier.  For ex-
	      ample, a modifier	of CM  will apply  when	  both	the  Meta  and
	      shift  keys  are down.  Function is one of the following:	After-
	      Step's built in functions, a  Pop-up  menu,  or  a  user-defined
	      function.

       Key keyname Context Modifiers Function
	      Binds   a	  keyboard key to a specified AfterStep	built in func-
	      tion. Definition is the same as  for  a  mouse binding,	except
	      that   the  mouse	button number is replaced with a key name. The
	      keyname is one of	the entries from /usr/include/X11/keysymdef.h,
	      with the leading XK_  omitted.  The Context and Modifiers	fields
	      are defined as in	the mouse binding.  Function  is  one  of  the
	      following:  AfterStep's built in functions, a Pop-up menu, or an
	      exec call	to a program.

	      Binding  a key to	a title-bar button will	not cause that	button
	      to appear	unless a mouse	binding	 also exists.

       IconBox left top	right bottom
	      Defines	regions	 of  the screen	in which to place icons. Up to
	      four icon	boxes can be defined. If  an  IconBox	line  is  pro-
	      vided, the icons will automatically be placed in them, if	possi-
	      ble. Each	 time  a window	 is  iconified,	 a new place is	 found
	      for  it.	 Icon  boxes  are  searched for	 space	going left  to
	      right,  then top to bottom.  Icons  will	not  be	 automatically
	      placed  on top of	 other	icons,	but  they  may	be placed  un-
	      derneath	application windows. If	left  or  right	 is  negative,
	      then  AfterStep  will add	 the  screen width  to it.  If	top or
	      bottom is	negative, then AfterStep will add the screen height to
	      it. NOTE:	-0  is not  parsed  as	the  right  or bottom pixel on
	      the screen. You have to use -1 instead.

	      If no IconBox line is provided, or all  icon  boxes  are	 full,
	      then  AfterStep  will place icons	near the current pointer loca-
	      tion.

       StubbornIconPlacement
	      When used	with IconBoxes,	 causes	  icons	   to	avoid  placing
	      themselves underneath existing windows.

       StubbornIcons
	      Changes  de-iconification	behavior a bit.	Instead	of having win-
	      dows always de-Iconify themselves	on  the	 current   page,   the
	      de-iconify into their original position.

       SuppressIcons Prevents icon windows from	being created or  drawn.  When
       used  with  the	window-list, this provides a sort of icon manager.

       StickyIcons
	      Causes icons to always stick to the screen's glass.   That   is,
	      icons  always  follow  you around	the desktop.  When a window is
	      de-iconified,  it	 gets  unstuck.	 Some people find this a  use-
	      ful way of moving	windows	around.

       IconTitle
	      Makes AfterStep add icon titles to the application's icon.  Note
	      that using icon titles will leave	less space for the application
	      icon itself on the button, since the icontitle covers up part of
	      the button.

       IconFont	fontname
	      Makes AfterStep use the font fontname instead   of  "fixed"  for
	      the IconTitle fonts.

       ButtonNoBorder
	      Defines  that the	icon buttons should not	have any borders drawn
	      around them.  This is particularly useful	to  have  "flat"  icon
	      buttons,	or  if	one defines a pixmap as	the background for the
	      buttons that already includes a border.

       ButtonTextureType num
	      Defines the gradient type	to use on the icon buttons.   See  the
	      discussion  of  TextureTypes  for	 the allowable values for num.
	      Use 0 for	num if you want	to set a solid color for  the  texture
	      with ButtonBgColor.

       ButtonTextureColor from to
	      Colors  that the gradient	will go	from and to when gradients are
	      drawn for	icon buttons.  The default values for from and to  are
	      #101030  and  #303080  respectively.    Values must be in	either
	      standard X color names or	hex notation.

       ButtonMaxColors NumColors
	      The number of colors to use on icon button  textures.   The  de-
	      fault is 10 on 8-bit video systems and 128 on 16+	bit video sys-
	      tems.

       ButtonBgColor Color
	      If ButtonTextureType is set to 0,	this command forces  AfterStep
	      to  use Color for	the button background.	 The default value for
	      Color is #bdbebd.	 Values	must be	in  either  standard  X	 color
	      names or hex notation.

       ButtonPixmap xpmname
	      Defines  the xpm file to be used as the background for icon but-
	      tons.  This xpm will be what shows through the transparent  pix-
	      els  in  the  application's defined xpm icon.  Application icons
	      can be defined using Icon	or Style.

       IconPath	path
	      Specifies	the full path name of a	directory  where bitmap	(mono-
	      chrome)  icons   can  be	found.	 The  path should start	with a
	      slash. Multiple directories may be  specified  in	a colon	 sepa-
	      rated list, just like the	PATH environment  variable.

       PixmapPath path
	      Specifies	 the   full  path  name	 of  a	directory where	pixmap
	      (color) icons can	be found. The  path   should  start   with   a
	      slash.   Multiple	 directories may be specified in a colon sepa-
	      rated list, just like  the PATH environment variable.

       Icon windowname bitmap-file
	      Specifies	the  bitmap to be used for a window when it is	iconi-
	      fied.   The  windowname  can be an applications window  name  or
	      class  name,  and	 must be enclosed in quotes.  The  bitmap-file
	      is   either   the	full  path name	to a standard X11 bitmap file,
	      or a file	in the IconPath	or PixmapPath.	 The   specified  bit-
	      map/pixmap   is used  in	preference to any icon supplied	by the
	      window itself.

	      If AfterStep is compiled	with XPM  support  for	 color	icons,
	      then can be an XPM pixmap	file.

	      windowname  should be enclosed in	double quotes, but bitmap-file
	      should not. No environmental  variables should be	 used  in  the
	      bitmap-file specification.

	      If windowname is an empty	string,	then the specified file	is the
	      default icon, and	will be	used   if  no  other  icon  bitmap  or
	      pixmap can be found:

	      Icon "" my-favorite-icon

       DecorateTransients
	      Causes   transient windows, which	are normally left undecorated,
	      to be given  the	usual AfterStep	decorations. Note   that  some
	      pop-up  windows, such as the xterm menus,	are not	managed	by the
	      window manager, and still	do not receive decorations.

       RandomPlacement
	      Causes  windows  which would normally require user placement  to
	      be automatically	placed	in ever-so-slightly random locations.

       SmartPlacement
	      Causes   windows	which would normally require user placement to
	      be automatically	placed	in a  smart location  -	a location  in
	      which they do not	overlap	any other windows on the screen. If no
	      such  position can be found, user-placement or random  placement
	      will be used as a	fall-back method.  For	the best of all	possi-
	      ble worlds, use both random placement and	SmartPlacement.

       StubbornPlacement
	      When using SmartPlacement, causes	new  windows  to avoid placing
	      themselves over icons.

       NoPPosition
	      Instructs	 AfterStep  to	ignore the PPosition field when	adding
	      new windows.   Adherence	to  the	 PPosition field  is  required
	      for some applications, but if you	don't have one of those, its a
	      real headache.

       ClickTime
	      delay Specifies the  maximum  delay  (in	milli-seconds) between
	      a	 button	press and a button release for the Function builtin to
	      consider	the action  a  mouse click. The	default	delay  is  150
	      milli-seconds.

	      The  same	 delay is used to decide whether a pop-up menu brought
	      up by pressing a mouse button  should  stay  visible  after  the
	      mouse button is released.

       ModulePath
	      Specifies	 a   path   for	AfterStep to search when looking for a
	      module to	load.  The path	is  a	colon  separated   list,  just
	      like the usual Unix PATH environment variable. Individual	direc-
	      tories do	 not  need trailing slashes.

       Module ModuleName
	      Specifies	a  module which	should be spawned  during  initializa-
	      tion.  The  modules  in  the  main distribution are Wharf, Auto,
	      Pager, and Audio.	 Fvwm 1.24 modules like	FvwmPager, FvwmBanner,
	      FvwmWinList,  FvwmClean,	FvwnIdent,  FvwmSave,  FvwmScroll, and
	      FvwmDebug	can also be used by  AfterStep.	  These	 modules  have
	      their own	man pages.  Module can	also  be  used	as  a builtin.
	      Modules can be short lived transient programs, or,  like	Wharf,
	      can  be	intended   to remain  for  the	duration of the	X ses-
	      sion.  Modules called by Module will be terminated by  the  win-
	      dow-manager  prior  to restarts  and quits, if possible. See the
	      introductory section on modules.

       Cursor cursor_num cursor_type
	      This provides a very awkward  way	 of  changing  cursor  styles.
	      Cursor   num   tells   which  cursor  you	are changing, and is a
	      number between 0 and 12, as follows:

	      0	POSITION      -	used when initially placing windows
	      1	TITLE	      -	used in	a window title-bar
	      2	DEFAULT	      -	used in	windows	that don't bother to set
				their cursor
	      3	SYS	      -	used in	one of the title-bar buttons
	      4	MOVE	      -	used when moving or resizing windows
	      5	WAIT	      -	used during an EXEC builtin command
	      6	MENU	      -	used in	menus
	      7	SELECT	      -	used for various builtin commands such as
				iconify
	      8	DESTROY	      -	used for DESTROY and DELETE built-ins
	      9	TOP	      -	used in	the top	side-bar of a window
	      10 RIGHT	      -	used in	the right side-bar (not	available)
	      11 BOTTOM	      -	used in	the bottom handle of a window
	      12 LEFT	      -	used in	the left side-bar (not available)
	      13 TOP_LEFT     -	used in	the top	left corner
	      14 TOP_RIGHT    -	used in	the top	right corner
	      15 BOTTOM_LEFT  -	used in	the bottom left	corner
	      16 BOTTOM_RIGHT -	used in	the bottom right corner

	      The cursor_type  argument	 is a number which  tells  the	cursor
	      shape  to	 use. The available numbers  can be  found in /usr/in-
	      clude/X11/cursorfont.h, and are currently	even numbers between 0
	      and   152.  At  the current time,	the following cursor types are
	      available.

	      0	  X_cursor		2   arrow
	      4	  based_arrow_down	6   based_arrow_up
	      8	  boat			10  bogosity
	      12  bottom_left_corner	14  bottom_right_corner
	      16  bottom_side		18  bottom_tee
	      20  box_spiral		22  center_ptr
	      24  circle		26  clock
	      28  coffee_mug		30  cross
	      32  cross_reverse		34  crosshair
	      36  diamond_cross		38  dot
	      40  dotbox		42  double_arrow
	      44  draft_large		46  draft_small
	      48  draped_box		50  exchange
	      52  fleur			54  gobbler
	      56  gumby			58  hand1
	      60  hand2			62  heart
	      64  icon			66  iron_cross
	      68  left_ptr		70  left_side
	      72  left_tee		74  leftbutton
	      76  ll_angle		78  lr_angle
	      80  man			82  middlebutton
	      84  mouse			86  pencil
	      88  pirate		90  plus
	      92  question_arrow	94  right_ptr
	      96  right_side		98  right_tee
	      100 rightbutton		102 rtl_logo
	      104 sailboat		106 sb_down_arrow
	      108 sb_h_double_arrow	110 sb_left_arrow
	      112 sb_right_arrow	114 sb_up_arrow
	      116 sb_v_double_arrow	118 shuttle
	      120 sizing		122 spider
	      124 spraycan		126 star
	      128 target		130 tcross
	      132 top_left_arrow	134 top_left_corner
	      136 top_right_corner	138 top_side
	      140 top_tee		142 trek
	      144 ul_angle		146 umbrella
	      148 ur_angle		150 watch
	      152 xterm

       AppsBackingStore
	      Causes   application  windows  to	request	 backing store.	Speci-
	      fying  this  option  causes  the	window manager	to  fail to be
	      ICCCM compliant. While this option can speed things up in	an  X-
	      terminal,	  where	re-draws  of  windows is expensive, it may not
	      help much	on regular workstations.

       SaveUnders
	      Causes the AfterStep decoration frames to	 request   saveunders.
	      This will	cause AfterStep	to save	those portions of windows that
	      are not visible to memory	(not video memory).  This can signifi-
	      cantly  improve  the  performance	 during	 opaque	 moves,	but it
	      causes a significant increase in memory usage.   This  can  also
	      cause garbled display with some applications.

       BackingStore
	      Causes  AfterStep	 decorations to	request	backing	store. See the
	      discussion for AppsBackingStore.

       Popup PopupName
	      Starts the definition of a pop-up	menu  which   will  later   be
	      bound  to	a mouse	button or key.	PopupName must be  enclosed in
	      quotes.	Menu  entries  are included  on	 lines	following  the
	      Popup  keyword.  The  menu  definition  ends with	the  key  word
	      EndPopup.	 Menu  entries are specified as	shown in the following
	      example.	 The  first word on each  line	is  the	built-in func-
	      tion which will be performed, followed by	the caption  (enclosed
	      in quotes) which will  be	shown in the menu, followed by any ad-
	      ditional arguments needed	by the	built-in  function.  Sub-menus
	      can   be	specified  by using the	Popup built-in,	as long	as the
	      sub-menu was  defined earlier  in	 the configuration file.

	      Popup "Window Ops"
		     Title   "Window Ops"
		     Move    "Move"
		     Resize  "Resize"
		     Raise   "Raise"
		     Lower   "Lower"
		     Iconify "(De)Iconify"
		     Nop     " "
		     Destroy "Destroy"
		     Title   "HARDCOPY"
		     Exec    "Hardcopy"	 exec xdpr &
		     Exec    "Hardcopy RV"  exec xdpr -rv &
	      EndPopup

	      Note  that  if  a	tab character is embedded in the caption of  a
	      menu  entry,  then  the  text  following the tab will be entered
	      into a second column in the menu,	and the	entire menu  will   be
	      left-adjusted.   This  is	 intended  for	shortcut labeling. The
	      tab character must really	be a tab. If it	 is expanded into spa-
	      ces it will not work! For	example

	      Popup "Window Ops"
		     Title   "Window Ops    Alt-F1"

	      Is   the	 start	of a left adjusted menu. Alt-F1	will be	placed
	      toward the right side of the menu.  Shortcut keys	may be	speci-
	      fied  in the menu	 definition by preceding the character with an
	      ampersand.  The ampersand	will not be displayed, but the	 char-
	      acter  after  it will be displayed at the	right side of the same
	      entry, and if the	user  presses  the  corresponding  key,	  then
	      that  item   will	 be activated as if the	user had clicked on it
	      with the mouse.  Only alphabetic and  numeric characters may  be
	      used  as	shortcut  keys.	 The shift state of  the  keyboard  is
	      ignored  when  testing shortcut characters. For example:-

	      Popup "Window Ops"
		     Maximize "Ma&ximise" 100 100
	      EndMenu

	      When  this  menu is popped up, the entry will appear  as	"Maxi-
	      mize  x",	and pressing the x key will cause  the	current	window
	      to  be  maximized.  Shortcut  keys  are  not  operative	unless
	      MENU_HOTKEYS   was   defined  when building AfterStep.  If  WIN-
	      DOWLIST_HOTKETS  was  also defined, then hot keys	are  automati-
	      cally  added  to the WindowList when it is displayed.

       Function	FunctionName
	      Starts   the   definition	of a complex function, composed	of the
	      AfterStep	built-in  functions,  which  will later	 be bound to a
	      mouse  button  or	key.  FunctionName must	be enclosed in quotes.
	      Function	entries	are  included  on lines	following the Function
	      keyword.	 The definition	ends with the  key  word  EndFunction.
	      Function	entries	are specified as shown in the following	 exam-
	      ple.  The	 first	word on	 each line  is	the  built-in function
	      which will be per- formed, followed the type  of	 event	 which
	      should  trigger	the   action (enclosed in quotes), followed by
	      any additional arguments needed by the built-in function.	 Menus
	      can  be  specified  by  using the	Popup built-in,	as long	as the
	      menu was defined	earlier	in the configuration file.

	      The  trigger actions which are recognized	are Immediate, Motion,
	      Click, DoubleClick and TripleClick. Immediate actions  are  exe-
	      cuted  as	 soon as the function is activated, even if  a	window
	      has  not been  selected.	If  there are  actions	other than im-
	      mediate ones, AfterStep will wait	to see if the user  is	click-
	      ing, double-clicking, triple-clicking or dragging	the mouse. Af-
	      ter the decision is  made	 AfterStep  will  execute   only   the
	      builtins	from   the  function  definition  whose	trigger	action
	      matches the action performed by the  user.   If	the  following
	      example were bound to button 1 in	a window title-bar, then, when
	      button 1 is pressed, AfterStep would  wait  150  msec   to   see
	      if   the	button is released. If the button is not released, Af-
	      terStep will start  a move operation. When the move operation is
	      complete,	 a raise operation will	be performed. If a button  re-
	      lease  is	 detected,  then AfterStep will	wait another 150  msec
	      for  a second click.  If	only  one click	 is detected, then the
	      window will be raised.  If two clicks are	detected,  the	window
	      will   be	 alternately  raised  and lowered. If three clicks are
	      detected the window will be Shaded or  un-Shaded,	 depending  on
	      the prior	state of the window. The 150 msec wait duration	can be
	      altered using the	ClickTime option.

	      Function "Move-or-Raise"
		     Move	  "Motion"
		     Raise	  "Motion"
		     Raise	  "Click"
		     RaiseLower	  "DoubleClick"
		     Shade	  "TripleClick"
	      EndFunction

	      The  clicking, double-clicking and triple-clicking  concepts  do
	      not carry	through	to using keyboard shortcuts.

	      Two  special  functions  exist:  InitFunction   and RestartFunc-
	      tion.  The  InitFunction	 will  be  called  when	 AfterStep  is
	      started  for  the	 first time  in	 any  X	session,  and  can  be
	      used  to start modules, set background   patterns,   and	 begin
	      programs.	   The restart	function will  be  called  when	After-
	      Step is restarted. It can	be used	 to  start  modules  and   set
	      background   patterns,   but   probably	should	not be used to
	      start programs.

BUILT IN FUNCTIONS
       AfterStep supports a small set of built	in  functions  which   can  be
       bound to	keyboard or mouse buttons.

       Nop
	      Does  nothing.  This is used to insert a blank line or separator
	      in a menu. If the	menu item specification	is Nop	"  ",  then  a
	      blank  line is inserted. If it looks like	Nop "",	 then  nothing
	      is inserted.

       Title
	      Does  nothing.  This is used to insert a title line in  a	 popup
	      or menu.

       Beep
	      Makes the	computer beep.

       Quit
	      Exits AfterStep, generally causing X to exit too.

       Restart name WindowManagerName
	      Causes AfterStep to re-read itself if WindowManagerName =	after-
	      step, or to switch to an alternate window	manager	if  WindowMan-
	      agerName	!= afterstep.  If the  window  manager is  not in your
	      default search path, then	you should use	the  full  path	  name
	      for WindowManagerName.

	      WindowManagerName	 is   not   quoted,  but name is.  name	is the
	      name that	appears	in a menu, if that is where  the  function  is
	      called  from.   name  is	required  even	if the function	is not
	      called from a menu, for ease of parsing.

	      This  command  should not	have a trailing	ampersand or any  com-
	      mand  line  arguments, and should	not  make use  of any environ-
	      mental variables.	Of the following examples, the first three are
	      sure losers,  but	the fourth is OK:

	      Key F1 R N Restart " " afterstep &
	      Key F1 R N Restart " " $(HOME)/bin/afterstep
	      Key F1 R N Restart " " twm -f .mystartupfile
	      Key F1 R N Restart " " /usr/local/bin/afterstep

       Refresh
	      Causes  all  windows on the screen to re-draw themselves.

       Move
	      Allows  the user to move a window. If  called  from somewhere in
	      a	window or its border, then that	 window	 will  be  moved.   If
	      called  from the root  window, then  the user will be allowed to
	      select the target	window

       Resize
	      Allows the user to resize	a window.

       Raise
	      Allows the user to raise a window.

       Lower
	      Allows the user to lower a window.

       RaiseLower
	      Alternately raises and lowers a window.

       Shade
	      Emulates the MacOS WindowShade feature.  Once activated the win-
	      dow will become a	titlebar only.

       Delete
	      Sends a message to a window asking that  it  remove itself, fre-
	      quently causing the application to exit.

       Destroy
	      Destroys a window. Guaranteed to	get  rid  of  the window,  but
	      is a fairly violent way to terminate an application.

       Close
	      If  the window accepts the delete	window protocol, a message  is
	      sent to the window asking	it to grace- fully remove  itself.  If
	      the  window does not  under- stand  the  delete window protocol,
	      then the window is destroyed.

       Iconify [value]
	      Iconifies	a window if it is  not	already	  iconified,  or   de-
	      iconifies	  it if	it is already iconified. If the	optional argu-
	      ment value is positive,  the  only  iconification	 will  be  al-
	      lowed,  and  de-iconification will be inhibited. It the optional
	      argument is negative, only de-iconification will be allowed.

       Maximize	[horizontal vertical]
	      Without its optional arguments, Maximize causes  the  window  to
	      alternately   switch   from   a	full-screen size to its	normal
	      size.

	      With  the	optional arguments horizontal and vertical, which  are
	      expressed	 as  percentage	  of   a  full screen,	the  user  can
	      control the new size of the window.  If  horizontal  > 0,	  then
	      the   horizontal dimension of  the  window  will be set to hori-
	      zontal*screen_width/100. The vertical resizing is	similar.   For
	      example, the following will switch a window to the full vertical
	      size of the screen: Maximize 0 100

	      The following causes windows to be stretched to the full	width:
	      Maximize 100 0

	      This  makes a window that	is half	the screen size	in each	direc-
	      tion: Maximize 50	50

	      Values larger than 100 can be used with caution.

       Stick
	      Makes  a window sticky if	it is  not  already  sticky,  or  non-
	      sticky if	it is already sticky.

       Scroll horizontal vertical
	      Scrolls  the  virtual  desktop's viewport	by horizontal pages in
	      the x-direction, and vertical pages in the  y-direction.	Either
	      or  both	entries	may be negative.  Both horizontal and vertical
	      values are expressed in percent of pages,	so  Scroll   100   100
	      means  to	scroll	down  and left by one full page.  Scroll 50 25
	      means to scroll left half	a  page	 and down  a  quarter	of   a
	      page.   The  scroll  function  should  not be called from	pop-up
	      menus.  Normally,	scrolling stops	at the	edge of	the desktop.

	      If the horizontal	and vertical  percentages  are	multiplied  by
	      1000, then scrolling will	wrap around at the  edge of  the desk-
	      top. If "Scroll 100000 0"	is executed over and  over,  AfterStep
	      will  move  to the  next desktop	page  on each  execution,  and
	      will wrap	around at the edge of the desktop,   so	  that	 every
	      page is hit in turn.

       TogglePage
	      Temporarily  disables edge scrolling.  Edge scrolling can	be re-
	      enabled by calling this again.

       CursorMove  horizontal vertical
	      Moves the	mouse pointer by horizontal pages in  the x-direction,
	      and  vertical  pages in the y-direction.	Either or both entries
	      may be negative. Both horizontal and  vertical  values  are  ex-
	      pressed in percent of pages, so CursorMove 100 100 means to move
	      down and	left by	one full page. CursorMove 50 25	means to  move
	      left  half  a page and down a  quarter  of  a page.  The Cursor-
	      Move function should not be called from pop-up menus.

       CirculateUp [name window_name]
	      Causes the pointer to move to the	previous  window in  the  list
	      of windows for which CirculateSkip has not not been specified as
	      CirculateSkip.

	      If the optional arguments	are  supplied,	then  the focus	  will
	      move  to	the first window whose name (or	icon  name  or	class)
	      matches window_name.  The	 optional  argument  name is  required
	      if window_name is	supplied, and is enclosed in quotes. This  ar-
	      gument is	 the  name  which  appears in menus if the function is
	      called  from  a  menu, but serves	no  purpose if the function is
	      not called from a	menu

	      Here's  an  example that moves the focus to an xterm window when
	      Alt-F1 is	pressed:

	      Key F1 A M CirculateUp "whatever"	xterm

       CirculateDown [name window_name]
	      Causes  the  pointer to move to the next	window	in the list of
	      windows for which	CirculateSkip has not not  been	 specified  as
	      CirculateSkip.

	      If  the optional arguments are  supplied,	 then  the focus  will
	      move to the first	window whose name (or icon  name   or	class)
	      matches  window_name.   The optional  argument  name is required
	      if window_name is	supplied, and is enclosed in quotes. This  ar-
	      gument is	 the  name  which  appears in menus if the function is
	      called from a menu, but serves no	 purpose if  the  function  is
	      not called from a	menu

       Warp [name window_name]
	      Same   as	 CirculateDown,	but De-Iconifies any iconified windows
	      as it focuses on them.

       Wait name
	      This built-in is intended	to  be	used  in  AfterStep  functions
	      only.   It   causes execution of a function to pause until a new
	      window named name	appears.  AfterStep remains  fully  functional
	      during  a	wait. This is particularly useful in the InitFunction,
	      if you are trying	to start windows on specific desktops:

	      Function "InitFunction"
		     Exec "I"  exec xterm -geometry 80x64+0+0
		     Wait "I"  xterm
		     Desk "I"  0 2
		     Exec "I"  exec xmh	-font fixed -geometry 507x750+0+0 &
		     Wait "I"  xmh
		     Desk "I"  0 0
	      EndFunction

	      The  above  function starts an xterm on the current desk,	 waits
	      for  it  to  map itself, then switches  to desk  2,  and	starts
	      an xmh. After the	xmh window appears, control moves to desk 0.

       Focus
	      Moves the	viewport or window as needed  to  make	 the  selected
	      window  visible.	Sets the keyboard focus	to the	selected  win-
	      dow. Raises  the	window	if needed  to  make it visible.	 Warps
	      the  pointer  into  the selected window  in  focus-follows-mouse
	      mode.  Does  not de-iconify.  This  function is primarily	 handy
	      when  used  with a  module  such	as  the	 FvwmWinList.

       Desk arg1 arg2
	      Changes to another desktop (workspace, room).

	      If   arg1	 is non	zero, then the next desktop number will	be the
	      current desktop number plus arg1.	Desktop	numbers, like arg1 can
	      be negative.

	      If  arg1	is zero, then the new desktop number will be arg2.

	      The   number   of	 active	 desktops is   determined dynamically.
	      Only desktops which contain windows or are currently being  dis-
	      played  are active.  Desktop numbers  must be between 2147483647
	      and -2147483648 (is that enough?).

       WindowsDesk new_desk
	      Moves the	selected window	to the desktop specified as new_desk.

       GotoPage	x y
	      Moves the	desktop	viewport to page (x,y).	The upper left page is
	      (0,0),  the  upper  right	is (N,0), where	N is one less than the
	      current number of	horizontal pages specified in	the   DeskTop-
	      Size   command.	The  lower   left page is (0,M), and the lower
	      right page is (N,M), where M is the desktop's vertical  size  as
	      specified	 in  the  DeskTopSize  command.	 The GotoPage function
	      should not be used in a pop-up menu.

       WindowList arg1 arg2
	      Generates	a pop-up menu (and pops	it up)	in  which  the	 title
	      and  geometry  of	 each of the windows currently on the desk top
	      are shown. The  geometry	of  iconified  windows	 is  shown  in
	      brackets.	 Selecting  an	item  from the window list pop-up menu
	      will cause that  window  to be moved onto	the desktop if	it  is
	      currently	 not  on  it,  will  move the desktop viewport to  the
	      page containing the upper	left hand corner of the	 window,  will
	      de-iconify  the  window  if it  is iconified, and	will raise the
	      window.

	      If arg1 is an even number, then the windows will be listed using
	      the  window  name	(the name  that	 shows up  in  the title-bar).
	      If it is odd, then the window's icon name	is used.

	      If arg1 is less than 2, then   all  windows   on	 all  desktops
	      (except  those	listed	in WindowListSkip directives), will be
	      show.

	      If arg1 is 2 or 3, then only windows on the current desktop will
	      be shown.

	      If   arg1	 is  4	or 5, then only	windows	on desktop number arg2
	      will be shown.

       Exec name command
	      Executes command.	 command is not	quoted,	 but name is.  name is
	      the  name	 that appears in a menu, if that is where the function
	      is called	from.  name is required	 even if the function  is  not
	      called from a menu, for ease of parsing.

	      The  following  example binds function key F1 in	the root  win-
	      dow,  with no modifiers, to  the	exec  function.	  The  program
	      rxvt(1) will  be	started, with  an assortment of	options.

	      Key  F1  R  N  Exec  "rxvt"  exec	 rxvt  -fg  yellow -bg blue -e
	      /bin/tcsh	&

       Popup
	      NOTE: This built-in takes	a slightly different form when used to
	      bind  a  sub-menu	 into a	 menu than  it does  when  binding the
	      main menu	to a key or mouse button. The form described  here  is
	      for   binding   a	 main menu to a	key or mouse button.  Used  to
	      bind a previously	defined	pop-up menu to a key or	mouse button.

	      The following example binds mouse	buttons	2  and	3 to  a	  pop-
	      up called	"Window	Ops", whose definition was provided as an  ex-
	      ample  earlier  in  this	man page.   The	 menu will  pop-up  if
	      the  buttons  2 or 3 are pressed	in  the	 window	 frame,	 side-
	      bar,  or title-bar,  with	 no modifiers (none of shift, control,
	      or meta).

	      Mouse 2	FST  N	  Popup	"Window	Ops"
	      Mouse 3	FST  N	  Popup	"Window	Ops"

	      Pop-ups  can  be	bound to keys through the use of the key modi-
	      fier. Pop-ups can	be operated without using the mouse by binding
	      to  keys,	 and operating via the up arrow, down arrow, and enter
	      keys.

	      The following example defines a  sub  menu,  "Quit-Verify"   and
	      binds  it	 into  a  main menu, called "Utilities".

	      Popup "Quit-Verify"
		     Title   "Really Quit AfterStep?"
		     Quit    "Yes, Really Quit"
		     Restart "Restart AfterStep" afterstep
		     Nop     "No, Don't	Quit"
	      EndPopup

	      Popup "Utilities"
		     Title   "Utilities"
		     Exec    "Xterm"	  exec xterm &
		     Exec    "Rxvt"	  exec rxvt &
		     Exec    "Top"	  exec rxvt -T Top -n Top -e top &
		     Exec    "Calculator" exec xcalc &
		     Exec    "Xman"	  exec xman &
		     Exec    "Xmag"	  exec xmag &
		     Popup   "Exit AfterStep"	  Quit-Verify
	      EndPopup

	      Sub-menus	 must be defined prior to the main menu	in which  they
	      are  bound.  Sub-menu  nesting can be arbitrarily	deep.

       Function
	      Used to bind a previously	defined	function to  a	key  or	 mouse
	      button.

	      The   following	example	  binds	  mouse	button 1 to a function
	      called "Move-or-Raise",  whose  definition was  provided	as  an
	      example	earlier	 in this man page. After performing this bind-
	      ing, AfterStep will execute to move-or-raise  function  whenever
	      button 1 is pressed in a window title-bar.

	      Mouse 1	 T	A	Function "Move-or-Raise"

       Module ModuleName
	      Specifies	 a  module  which  should  be spawned. At  the current
	      time,  the only included modules are  Wharf  and	Pager.	 Wharf
	      will  normally   be  spawned  during initialization  instead  of
	      in response to a mouse binding or	menu action.  Modules  can  be
	      short   lived transient programs,	 or,  like  Wharf,  can	be in-
	      tended to	remain for the duration	of the	 X   session.	Module
	      will   be	  terminated   by the window manager prior to restarts
	      and quits, if possible.

KEYBOARD SHORTCUTS
       All window-manager operations can  be  performed	from   the   keyboard,
       so  mouse-less  operation  should  not  be  difficult.  In  addition to
       scrolling  around  the	virtual	 desktop   by	binding	  the	Scroll
       built-in	 to  appropriate  keys,	 Pop-ups,  move, resize	and most other
       built-ins  can be bound to keys.	Once a built-in	function  is  started,
       the  pointer is moved by	using the up, down,  left,  and	 right arrows,
       and  the	action is terminated by	pressing  return.   Holding  down  the
       shift key will cause the	pointer	movement to  go	 in  larger steps, and
       holding down the	control	key will cause the cursor movement  to	go  in
       smaller steps.  Standard	emacs and vi cursor movement controls (^n, ^p,
       ^f, ^b, and ^j, ^k, ^h, ^l) can be  used	instead	of the arrow keys.

SUPPLIED CONFIGURATION
       A  sample  configuration	file, sample.steprc was	supplied with the  Af-
       terStep distribution. It	is well	commented and  can be used as a	source
       of examples for AfterStep configuration.

USE ON MULTI-SCREEN DISPLAYS
       AfterStep does work on multi-screen displays.  If the -s	 command  line
       argument	 is not	given to AfterStep , it	will automatically start up on
       every screen on the specified display.  After  AfterStep	 starts,  each
       screen	is   treated  independently. Re-starts of AfterStep need to be
       performed separately on each screen.  The  use of  EdgeScroll  0	 0  is
       strongly	recommended for	multi-screen displays.

       You   may need  to  quit	on each	screen to quit from the	X session com-
       pletely.

       Multi-screen support is only available if  you  compile	with  -DMULTI-
       PLE_SCREENS

SEE ALSO
       Wharf(1),Animate(1),Audio(1),Auto(1),asclock(1),Banner(1),Pager(1)

AUTHORS
       Frank Fejes (frank@canweb.net)

       Alfredo Kenji Kojima (kojima@inf.ufrgs.br)

       Dan Weeks (dan@mango.sfasu.edu)

AfterStep			  March	1997			AFTERSTEP(1.0)

NAME | SYNOPSIS | DESCRIPTION | SPECIAL NOTE FOR XFREE86 USERS | COPYRIGHTS | ANATOMY OF A WINDOW | THE VIRTUAL DESKTOP | INITIALIZATION | ICONS | MODULES | ICCCM COMPLIANCE | M4 PREPROCESSING | OPTIONS | CONFIGURATION OPTIONS | BUILT IN FUNCTIONS | KEYBOARD SHORTCUTS | SUPPLIED CONFIGURATION | USE ON MULTI-SCREEN DISPLAYS | SEE ALSO | AUTHORS

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