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Spreadsheet::WriteExceUser(Contributed Perl DocumSpreadsheet::WriteExcelXML(3)

NAME
       Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML - Create an Excel file in XML	format.

VERSION
       This document refers to version 0.13 of Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML,
       released	February 26, 2011. This	module is now deprecated in favour of
       Excel::Writer::XLSX, see	below.

SYNOPSIS
       To write	a string, a formatted string, a	number and a formula to	the
       first worksheet in an Excel XML spreadsheet called perl.xls:

	   use Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML;

	   # Create a new Excel	workbook
	   my $workbook	= Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML->new("perl.xls");

	   # Add a worksheet
	   $worksheet =	$workbook->add_worksheet();

	   #  Add and define a format
	   $format = $workbook->add_format(); #	Add a format
	   $format->set_bold();
	   $format->set_color('red');
	   $format->set_align('center');

	   # Write a formatted and unformatted string, row and column notation.
	   $col	= $row = 0;
	   $worksheet->write($row, $col, "Hi Excel!", $format);
	   $worksheet->write(1,	   $col, "Hi Excel!");

	   # Write a number and	a formula using	A1 notation
	   $worksheet->write('A3', 1.2345);
	   $worksheet->write('A4', '=SIN(PI()/4)');

DEPRECATION NOTICE
       This module is now deprecated in	favour of Excel::Writer::XLSX which
       supports	all of the features of this module, plus many more and is
       actively	maintained.

       By and large Excel::Writer::XLSX	is a drop in replacement for
       Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML.

DESCRIPTION
       The "Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML"	module can be used to create an	Excel
       file in XML format. The Excel XML format	is supported in	Excel 2002 and
       2003.

       Multiple	worksheets can be added	to a workbook and formatting can be
       applied to cells. Text, numbers,	and formulas can be written to the
       cells. The module supports strings up to	32,767 characters and the
       strings can be in UTF8 format.

       "Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML" uses the same interface as
       "Spreadsheet::WriteExcel".

       This module cannot, as yet, be used to write to an existing Excel XML
       file.

Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML and Spreadsheet::WriteExcel
       "Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML" uses the same interface as the
       "Spreadsheet::WriteExcel" module	which produces an Excel	file in	binary
       format.

       While Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML	doesn't	currently support all of the
       features	of Spreadsheet::WriteExcel the intention is that it eventually
       will.

       However there are some features of the Excel binary format that aren't
       supported in by the Excel XML specification:

       o   Graphs.

       o   Macros.

       o   Outlines and	grouping. (supported by	Spreadsheet::WriteExcel)

       o   Password protection.	(supported by Spreadsheet::WriteExcel)

       o   Embedded images. (supported by Spreadsheet::WriteExcel)

QUICK START
       Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML tries	to provide an interface	to as many of
       Excel's features	as possible. As	a result there is a lot	of
       documentation to	accompany the interface	and it can be difficult	at
       first glance to see what	it important and what is not. So for those of
       you who prefer to assemble Ikea furniture first and then	read the
       instructions, here are three easy steps:

       1. Create a new Excel workbook (i.e. file) using	"new()".

       2. Add a	worksheet to the new workbook using "add_worksheet()".

       3. Write	to the worksheet using "write()".

       Like this:

	   use Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML;			       # Step 0

	   my $workbook	= Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML->new("perl.xls"); # Step 1
	   $worksheet	= $workbook->add_worksheet();		       # Step 2
	   $worksheet->write('A1', "Hi Excel!");		       # Step 3

       This will create	an Excel file called "perl.xls"	with a single
       worksheet and the text "Hi Excel!" in the relevant cell.	And that's it.
       Okay, so	there is actually a zeroth step	as well, but "use module" goes
       without saying. There are also more than	40 examples that come with the
       distribution and	which you can use to get you started. See EXAMPLES.

       Those of	you who	read the instructions first and	assemble the furniture
       afterwards will know how	to proceed. ;-)

WORKBOOK METHODS
       The Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML module provides an object	oriented
       interface to a new Excel	workbook. The following	methods	are available
       through a new workbook.

	   new()
	   close()
	   set_tempdir() **
	   add_worksheet()
	   add_format()
	   set_custom_color() *
	   sheets()
	   set_1904() *
	   set_codepage() *
	   use_lower_cell_limits()

	   *   Not yet supported. See Spreadsheet::WriteExcel.
	   **  Not required by Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML.

       If you are unfamiliar with object oriented interfaces or	the way	that
       they are	implemented in Perl have a look	at "perlobj" and "perltoot" in
       the main	Perl documentation.

   new()
       A new Excel workbook is created using the "new()" constructor which
       accepts either a	filename or a filehandle as a parameter. The following
       example creates a new Excel file	based on a filename:

	   my $workbook	 = Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML->new('filename.xls');
	   my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet();
	   $worksheet->write(0,	0, 'Hi Excel!');

       Here are	some other examples of using "new()" with filenames:

	   my $workbook1 = Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML->new($filename);
	   my $workbook2 = Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML->new('/tmp/filename.xls');
	   my $workbook3 = Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML->new("c:\\tmp\\filename.xls");
	   my $workbook4 = Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML->new('c:\tmp\filename.xls');

       The last	two examples demonstrates how to create	a file on DOS or
       Windows where it	is necessary to	either escape the directory separator
       "\" or to use single quotes to ensure that it isn't interpolated. For
       more information	see "perlfaq5: Why can't I use "C:\temp\foo" in	DOS
       paths?".

       The "new()" constructor returns a Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML object
       that you	can use	to add worksheets and store data. It should be noted
       that although "my" is not specifically required it defines the scope of
       the new workbook	variable and, in the majority of cases,	ensures	that
       the workbook is closed properly without explicitly calling the
       "close()" method.

       If the file cannot be created, due to file permissions or some other
       reason,	"new" will return "undef". Therefore, it is good practice to
       check the return	value of "new" before proceeding. As usual the Perl
       variable	$! will	be set if there	is a file creation error. You will
       also see	one of the warning messages detailed in	DIAGNOSTICS:

	   my $workbook	 = Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML->new('protected.xls');
	   die "Problems creating new Excel file: $!" unless defined $workbook;

       You can also pass a valid filehandle to the "new()" constructor.	For
       example in a CGI	program	you could do something like this:

	   my $workbook	 = Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML->new(\*STDOUT);

       For CGI programs	you can	also use the special Perl filename '-' which
       will redirect the output	to STDOUT:

	   my $workbook	 = Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML->new('-');

       See also, the "cgi.pl" program in the "examples"	directory of the
       distro.

       However,	this special case will not work	in "mod_perl" programs where
       you will	have to	do something like the following:

	   # mod_perl 1
	   ...
	   tie *XLS, 'Apache';

	   my $workbook	 = Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML->new(\*XLS);
	   ...

	   # mod_perl 2
	   ...
	   tie *XLS => $r;  # Tie to the Apache::RequestRec object

	   my $workbook	 = Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML->new(\*XLS);
	   ...

       See also, the "mod_perl1.pl" and	"mod_perl2.pl" programs	in the
       "examples" directory of the distro.

       Filehandles can also be useful if you want to stream an Excel file over
       a socket	or if you want to store	an Excel file in a scalar.

       For example here	is a way to write an Excel file	to a scalar with "perl
       5.8":

	   #!/usr/bin/perl -w

	   use strict;
	   use Spreadsheet::WriteExcel;

	   # Requires perl 5.8 or later
	   open	my $fh,	'>', \my $str or die "Failed to	open filehandle: $!";

	   my $workbook	 = Spreadsheet::WriteExcel->new($fh);
	   my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet();

	   $worksheet->write(0,	0,  'Hi	Excel!');

	   $workbook->close();

	   # The Excel file in now in $str.
	   print $str;

       See also	the "write_to_scalar.pl" and "filehandle.pl" programs in the
       "examples" directory of the distro.

   close()
       In general your Excel file will be closed automatically when your
       program ends or when the	Workbook object	goes out of scope, however the
       "close()" method	can be used to explicitly close	an Excel file.

	   $workbook->close();

       An explicit "close()" is	required if the	file must be closed prior to
       performing some external	action on it such as copying it, reading its
       size or attaching it to an email.

       In addition, "close()" may be required to prevent perl's	garbage
       collector from disposing	of the Workbook, Worksheet and Format objects
       in the wrong order. Situations where this can occur are:

       o   If "my()" was not used to declare the scope of a workbook variable
	   created using "new()".

       o   If the "new()", "add_worksheet()" or	"add_format()" methods are
	   called in subroutines.

       The reason for this is that Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML relies on	Perl's
       "DESTROY" mechanism to trigger destructor methods in a specific
       sequence. This may not happen in	cases where the	Workbook, Worksheet
       and Format variables are	not lexically scoped or	where they have
       different lexical scopes.

       In general, if you create a file	with a size of 0 bytes or you fail to
       create a	file you need to call "close()".

       The return value	of "close()" is	the same as that returned by perl when
       it closes the file created by "new()". This allows you to handle	error
       conditions in the usual way:

	   $workbook->close() or die "Error closing file: $!";

   set_tempdir()
       This method isn't used by Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML. It	is only
       required	by Spreadsheet::WriteExcel.

   add_worksheet($sheetname)
       At least	one worksheet should be	added to a new workbook. A worksheet
       is used to write	data into cells:

	   $worksheet1 = $workbook->add_worksheet();	      #	Sheet1
	   $worksheet2 = $workbook->add_worksheet('Foglio2'); #	Foglio2
	   $worksheet3 = $workbook->add_worksheet('Data');    #	Data
	   $worksheet4 = $workbook->add_worksheet();	      #	Sheet4

       If $sheetname is	not specified the default Excel	convention will	be
       followed, i.e. Sheet1, Sheet2, etc.

       The worksheet name must be a valid Excel	worksheet name,	i.e. it	cannot
       contain any of the following characters,	": * ? / \" and	it must	be
       less than 32 characters.	In addition, you cannot	use the	same, case
       insensitive, $sheetname for more	than one worksheet.

   add_format(%properties)
       The "add_format()" method can be	used to	create new Format objects
       which are used to apply formatting to a cell. You can either define the
       properties at creation time via a hash of property values or later via
       method calls.

	   $format1 = $workbook->add_format(%props); # Set properties at creation
	   $format2 = $workbook->add_format();	     # Set properties later

       See the "CELL FORMATTING" section for more details about	Format
       properties and how to set them.

   set_custom_color($index, $red, $green, $blue)
       Note: This method is not	yet supported by Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML.
       See Spreadsheet::WriteExcel if you need this feature.

       The "set_custom_color()"	method can be used to override one of the
       built-in	palette	values with a more suitable colour.

       The value for $index should be in the range 8..63, see "COLOURS IN
       EXCEL".

       The default named colours use the following indices:

	    8	=>   black
	    9	=>   white
	   10	=>   red
	   11	=>   lime
	   12	=>   blue
	   13	=>   yellow
	   14	=>   magenta
	   15	=>   cyan
	   16	=>   brown
	   17	=>   green
	   18	=>   navy
	   20	=>   purple
	   22	=>   silver
	   23	=>   gray
	   53	=>   orange

       A new colour is set using its RGB (red green blue) components. The
       $red, $green and	$blue values must be in	the range 0..255. You can
       determine the required values in	Excel using the
       "Tools->Options->Colors->Modify"	dialog.

       The "set_custom_color()"	workbook method	can also be used with a	HTML
       style "#rrggbb" hex value:

	   $workbook->set_custom_color(40, 255,	 102,  0   ); #	Orange
	   $workbook->set_custom_color(40, 0xFF, 0x66, 0x00); #	Same thing
	   $workbook->set_custom_color(40, '#FF6600'	   ); #	Same thing

	   my $font = $workbook->add_format(color => 40); # Use	the modified colour

       The return value	from "set_custom_color()" is the index of the colour
       that was	changed:

	   my $ferrari = $workbook->set_custom_color(40, 216, 12, 12);

	   my $format  = $workbook->add_format(
					       bg_color	=> $ferrari,
					       pattern	=> 1,
					       border	=> 1
					     );

   sheets(0, 1,	...)
       The "sheets()" method returns a list, or	a sliced list, of the
       worksheets in a workbook.

       If no arguments are passed the method returns a list of all the
       worksheets in the workbook. This	is useful if you want to repeat	an
       operation on each worksheet:

	   foreach $worksheet ($workbook->sheets()) {
	      print $worksheet->get_name();
	   }

       You can also specify a slice list to return one or more worksheet
       objects:

	   $worksheet =	$workbook->sheets(0);
	   $worksheet->write('A1', 'Hello');

       Or since	return value from "sheets()" is	a reference to a worksheet
       object you can write the	above example as:

	   $workbook->sheets(0)->write('A1', 'Hello');

       The following example returns the first and last	worksheet in a
       workbook:

	   foreach $worksheet ($workbook->sheets(0, -1)) {
	      #	Do something
	   }

       Array slices are	explained in the perldata manpage.

   set_1904()
       Note: This method is not	yet supported by Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML.
       See Spreadsheet::WriteExcel if you need this feature.

       Excel stores dates as real numbers where	the integer part stores	the
       number of days since the	epoch and the fractional part stores the
       percentage of the day. The epoch	can be either 1900 or 1904. Excel for
       Windows uses 1900 and Excel for Macintosh uses 1904. However, Excel on
       either platform will convert automatically between one system and the
       other.

       Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML stores dates in the 1900 format by default.
       If you wish to change this you can call the "set_1904()"	workbook
       method. You can query the current value by calling the "get_1904()"
       workbook	method.	This returns 0 for 1900	and 1 for 1904.

       See also	"DATES IN EXCEL" for more information about working with
       Excel's date system.

       In general you probably won't need to use "set_1904()".

   set_codepage($codepage)
       Note: This method is not	yet supported by Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML.
       See Spreadsheet::WriteExcel if you need this feature.

       The default code	page or	character set used by
       Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML is ANSI. This	is also	the default used by
       Excel for Windows. Occasionally however it may be necessary to change
       the code	page via the "set_codepage()" method.

       Changing	the code page may be required if your are using
       Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML on the Macintosh and you are using
       characters outside the ASCII 128	character set:

	   $workbook->set_codepage(1); # ANSI, MS Windows
	   $workbook->set_codepage(2); # Apple Macintosh

       The "set_codepage()" method is rarely required.

   use_lower_cell_limits()
       Excel 2007 allows cell limits of	1,048,576 rows x 16,384	columns. These
       limits are supported by Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML for versions >=
       0.11.

       For backwards compatibility the older limits of 65,536 rows x 256
       columns can still be imposed via	the "use_lower_cell_limits()" method.

	   $workbook->use_lower_cell_limits();

WORKSHEET METHODS
       A new worksheet is created by calling the "add_worksheet()" method from
       a workbook object:

	   $worksheet1 = $workbook->add_worksheet();
	   $worksheet2 = $workbook->add_worksheet();

       The following methods are available through a new worksheet:

	   write()
	   write_number()
	   write_string()
	   keep_leading_zeros()
	   write_blank()
	   write_html_string()
	   write_row()
	   write_col()
	   write_date_time()
	   write_url()
	   write_url_range() *
	   write_formula()
	   store_formula() **
	   repeat_formula() **
	   insert_bitmap() ***
	   add_write_handler()
	   get_name()
	   activate() *
	   select() *
	   set_first_sheet() *
	   protect() *
	   set_selection() *
	   set_row()
	   set_column()
	   outline_settings() ***
	   freeze_panes() *
	   thaw_panes()	*
	   merge_range()
	   set_zoom() *
	   autofilter()
	   filter_column()

	   *   Not yet supported. See Spreadsheet::WriteExcel.
	   **  Not required by Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML.
	   *** Not supported by	Excel XML.

   Cell	notation
       Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML supports two forms of	notation to designate
       the position of cells: Row-column notation and A1 notation.

       Row-column notation uses	a zero based index for both row	and column
       while A1	notation uses the standard Excel alphanumeric sequence of
       column letter and 1-based row. For example:

	   (0, 0)      # The top left cell in row-column notation.
	   ('A1')      # The top left cell in A1 notation.

	   (1999, 29)  # Row-column notation.
	   ('AD2000')  # The same cell in A1 notation.

       Row-column notation is useful if	you are	referring to cells
       programmatically:

	   for my $i (0	.. 9) {
	       $worksheet->write($i, 0,	'Hello'); # Cells A1 to	A10
	   }

       A1 notation is useful for setting up a worksheet	manually and for
       working with formulas:

	   $worksheet->write('H1', 200);
	   $worksheet->write('H2', '=H1+1');

       In formulas and applicable methods you can also use the "A:A" column
       notation:

	   $worksheet->write('A1', '=SUM(B:B)');

       The "Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML::Utility" module	that is	included in
       the distro contains helper functions for	dealing	with A1	notation, for
       example:

	   use Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML::Utility;

	   ($row, $col)	   = xl_cell_to_rowcol('C2');  # (1, 2)
	   $str		   = xl_rowcol_to_cell(1, 2);  # C2

       For simplicity, the parameter lists for the worksheet method calls in
       the following sections are given	in terms of row-column notation. In
       all cases it is also possible to	use A1 notation.

       Note: in	Excel it is also possible to use a R1C1	notation. This is not
       supported by Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML.

   write($row, $column,	$token,	$format)
       Excel makes a distinction between data types such as strings, numbers,
       blanks, formulas	and hyperlinks.	To simplify the	process	of writing
       data the	"write()" method acts as a general alias for several more
       specific	methods:

	   write_string()
	   write_number()
	   write_blank()
	   write_formula()
	   write_url()
	   write_row()
	   write_col()

       The general rule	is that	if the data looks like a something then	a
       something is written. Here are some examples in both row-column and A1
       notation:

							     # Same as:
	   $worksheet->write(0,	0, 'Hello'		  ); # write_string()
	   $worksheet->write(1,	0, 'One'		  ); # write_string()
	   $worksheet->write(2,	0,  2			  ); # write_number()
	   $worksheet->write(3,	0,  3.00001		  ); # write_number()
	   $worksheet->write(4,	0,  ""			  ); # write_blank()
	   $worksheet->write(5,	0,  ''			  ); # write_blank()
	   $worksheet->write(6,	0,  undef		  ); # write_blank()
	   $worksheet->write(7,	0			  ); # write_blank()
	   $worksheet->write(8,	0,  'http://www.perl.com/'); # write_url()
	   $worksheet->write('A9',  'ftp://ftp.cpan.org/' ); # write_url()
	   $worksheet->write('A10', 'internal:Sheet1!A1'  ); # write_url()
	   $worksheet->write('A11', 'external:c:\foo.xls' ); # write_url()
	   $worksheet->write('A12', '=A3 + 3*A4'	  ); # write_formula()
	   $worksheet->write('A13', '=SIN(PI()/4)'	  ); # write_formula()
	   $worksheet->write('A14', \@array		  ); # write_row()
	   $worksheet->write('A15', [\@array]		  ); # write_col()

	   # And if the	keep_leading_zeros property is set:
	   $worksheet->write('A16,  2			  ); # write_number()
	   $worksheet->write('A17,  02			  ); # write_string()
	   $worksheet->write('A18,  00002		  ); # write_string()

	   # Write an array formula. Not available in Spreadsheet::WriteExcel.
	   $worksheet->write('A18,  '{=SUM(A1:B1*A2:B2)}' ); # write_formula()

       The "looks like"	rule is	defined	by regular expressions:

       "write_number()"	if $token is a number based on the following regex:
       "$token =~ /^([+-]?)(?=\d|\.\d)\d*(\.\d*)?([Ee]([+-]?\d+))?$/".

       "write_string()"	if "keep_leading_zeros()" is set and $token is an
       integer with leading zeros based	on the following regex:	"$token	=~
       /^0\d+$/".

       "write_blank()" if $token is undef or a blank string: "undef", "" or
       ''.

       "write_url()" if	$token is a http, https, ftp or	mailto URL based on
       the following regexes: "$token =~ m|^[fh]tt?ps?://|" or	"$token	=~
       m|^mailto:|".

       "write_url()" if	$token is an internal or external sheet	reference
       based on	the following regex: "$token =~	m[^(in|ex)ternal:]".

       "write_formula()" if the	first character	of $token is "=".

       "write_array_formula()" if the $token matches "/^{=.*}$/".

       "write_row()" if	$token is an array ref.

       "write_col()" if	$token is an array ref of array	refs.

       "write_string()"	if none	of the previous	conditions apply.

       The $format parameter is	optional. It should be a valid Format object,
       see "CELL FORMATTING":

	   my $format =	$workbook->add_format();
	   $format->set_bold();
	   $format->set_color('red');
	   $format->set_align('center');

	   $worksheet->write(4,	0, 'Hello', $format); #	Formatted string

       The write() method will ignore empty strings or "undef" tokens unless a
       format is also supplied.	As such	you needn't worry about	special
       handling	for empty or "undef" values in your data. See also the
       "write_blank()" method.

       One problem with	the "write()" method is	that occasionally data looks
       like a number but you don't want	it treated as a	number.	For example,
       zip codes or ID numbers often start with	a leading zero.	If you write
       this data as a number then the leading zero(s) will be stripped.	You
       can change this default behaviour by using the "keep_leading_zeros()"
       method. While this property is in place any integers with leading zeros
       will be treated as strings and the zeros	will be	preserved. See the
       "keep_leading_zeros()" section for a full discussion of this issue.

       You can also add	your own data handlers to the "write()"	method using
       "add_write_handler()".

       On systems with "perl 5.8" and later the	"write()" method will also
       handle Unicode strings in "UTF-8" format.

       The "write" methods return:

	   0 for success.
	  -1 for insufficient number of	arguments.
	  -2 for row or	column out of bounds.
	  -3 for string	too long.

   write_number($row, $column, $number,	$format)
       Write an	integer	or a float to the cell specified by $row and $column:

	   $worksheet->write_number(0, 0,  123456);
	   $worksheet->write_number('A2',  2.3451);

       See the note about "Cell	notation". The $format parameter is optional.

       In general it is	sufficient to use the "write()"	method.

   write_string($row, $column, $string,	$format)
       Write a string to the cell specified by $row and	$column:

	   $worksheet->write_string(0, 0, 'Your	text here' );
	   $worksheet->write_string('A2', 'or here' );

       The maximum string size is 32767	characters. However the	maximum	string
       segment that Excel can display in a cell	is 1000. All 32767 characters
       can be displayed	in the formula bar.

       The $format parameter is	optional.

       On systems with "perl 5.8" and later the	"write()" method will also
       handle strings in Perl's	"utf8" format. See also	the "unicode_*.pl"
       programs	in the examples	directory of the distro.

       In general it is	sufficient to use the "write()"	method.	However, you
       may sometimes wish to use the "write_string()" method to	write data
       that looks like a number	but that you don't want	treated	as a number.
       For example, zip	codes or phone numbers:

	   # Write as a	plain string
	   $worksheet->write_string('A1', '01209');

       However,	if the user edits this string Excel may	convert	it back	to a
       number. To get around this you can use the Excel	text format "@":

	   # Format as a string. Doesn't change	to a number when edited
	   my $format1 = $workbook->add_format(num_format => '@');
	   $worksheet->write_string('A2', '01209', $format1);

       See also	the note about "Cell notation".

   keep_leading_zeros()
       This method changes the default handling	of integers with leading zeros
       when using the "write()"	method.

       The "write()" method uses regular expressions to	determine what type of
       data to write to	an Excel worksheet. If the data	looks like a number it
       writes a	number using "write_number()". One problem with	this approach
       is that occasionally data looks like a number but you don't want	it
       treated as a number.

       Zip codes and ID	numbers, for example, often start with a leading zero.
       If you write this data as a number then the leading zero(s) will	be
       stripped. This is the also the default behaviour	when you enter data
       manually	in Excel.

       To get around this you can use one of three options. Write a formatted
       number, write the number	as a string or use the "keep_leading_zeros()"
       method to change	the default behaviour of "write()":

	   # Implicitly	write a	number,	the leading zero is removed: 1209
	   $worksheet->write('A1', '01209');

	   # Write a zero padded number	using a	format:	01209
	   my $format1 = $workbook->add_format(num_format => '00000');
	   $worksheet->write('A2', '01209', $format1);

	   # Write explicitly as a string: 01209
	   $worksheet->write_string('A3', '01209');

	   # Write implicitly as a string: 01209
	   $worksheet->keep_leading_zeros();
	   $worksheet->write('A4', '01209');

       The above code would generate a worksheet that looked like the
       following:

	    -----------------------------------------------------------
	   |   |     A	   |	 B     |     C	   |	 D     | ...
	    -----------------------------------------------------------
	   | 1 |      1209 |	       |	   |	       | ...
	   | 2 |     01209 |	       |	   |	       | ...
	   | 3 | 01209	   |	       |	   |	       | ...
	   | 4 | 01209	   |	       |	   |	       | ...

       The examples are	on different sides of the cells	due to the fact	that
       Excel displays strings with a left justification	and numbers with a
       right justification by default. You can change this by using a format
       to justify the data, see	"CELL FORMATTING".

       It should be noted that if the user edits the data in examples "A3" and
       "A4" the	strings	will revert back to numbers. Again this	is Excel's
       default behaviour. To avoid this	you can	use the	text format "@":

	   # Format as a string	(01209)
	   my $format2 = $workbook->add_format(num_format => '@');
	   $worksheet->write_string('A5', '01209', $format2);

       The "keep_leading_zeros()" property is off by default. The
       "keep_leading_zeros()" method takes 0 or	1 as an	argument. It defaults
       to 1 if an argument isn't specified:

	   $worksheet->keep_leading_zeros();  #	Set on
	   $worksheet->keep_leading_zeros(1); #	Set on
	   $worksheet->keep_leading_zeros(0); #	Set off

       See also	the "add_write_handler()" method.

   write_blank($row, $column, $format)
       Write a blank cell specified by $row and	$column:

	   $worksheet->write_blank(0, 0, $format);

       This method is used to add formatting to	a cell which doesn't contain a
       string or number	value.

       Excel differentiates between an "Empty" cell and	a "Blank" cell.	An
       "Empty" cell is a cell which doesn't contain data whilst	a "Blank" cell
       is a cell which doesn't contain data but	does contain formatting. Excel
       stores "Blank" cells but	ignores	"Empty"	cells.

       As such,	if you write an	empty cell without formatting it is ignored:

	   $worksheet->write('A1',  undef, $format); # write_blank()
	   $worksheet->write('A2',  undef	  ); # Ignored

       This seemingly uninteresting fact means that you	can write arrays of
       data without special treatment for undef	or empty string	values.

       See the note about "Cell	notation".

   write_html_string($row, $column, $html_string, $format)
       The "write_html_string" method can be used to write a string with
       multiple	formats	to a cell using	simple Html tags. For example to write
       a string	like "Some bold	and italic text":

	   my $html_string = 'Some <B>bold</B> and <I>italic</I> text';

	   $worksheet->write_html_string('A1', $html_string);

       Standard	non-font formatting, such as background	and border can also
       added to	the cell.

	   my $format =	$workbook->add_format(fg_color => 'yellow', border => 6);

	   $worksheet->write_html_string('A2', $html_string, $format);

       The following example writes a string with subscript and	superscript.
       It also increase	the font size to make it more visible.

	   my $html_str	= 'x<Sub><I>j</I></Sub><Sup>(n-1)</Sup>';

	   my $format	= $workbook->add_format(size =>	20);

	   $worksheet->write_html_string('A3', $html_string, $format);

       Multiple	colours	can be applied to the cell text	using simple Html font
       formatting:

	   # Write a multicoloured string.

	   my $html_string = '<Font html:Color="#FF0000">Red</Font>'  .
			     '<Font> and </Font>'		      .
			     '<Font html:Color="#0000FF">Blue</Font>';

	   $worksheet->write_html_string('A4', $_html_string);

       Only a limited subset of	Html is	allowed	by Excel. For more complex
       examples	create a Spreadsheet XML file in Excel and examine the output.

       Note: This method is not	available in Spreadsheet::WriteExcel.

   write_row($row, $column, $array_ref,	$format)
       The "write_row()" method	can be used to write a 1D or 2D	array of data
       in one go. This is useful for converting	the results of a database
       query into an Excel worksheet. You must pass a reference	to the array
       of data rather than the array itself. The "write()" method is then
       called for each element of the data. For	example:

	   @array      = ('awk', 'gawk', 'mawk');
	   $array_ref  = \@array;

	   $worksheet->write_row(0, 0, $array_ref);

	   # The above example is equivalent to:
	   $worksheet->write(0,	0, $array[0]);
	   $worksheet->write(0,	1, $array[1]);
	   $worksheet->write(0,	2, $array[2]);

       Note: For convenience the "write()" method behaves in the same way as
       "write_row()" if	it is passed an	array reference. Therefore the
       following two method calls are equivalent:

	   $worksheet->write_row('A1', $array_ref); # Write a row of data
	   $worksheet->write(	 'A1', $array_ref); # Same thing

       As with all of the write	methods	the $format parameter is optional. If
       a format	is specified it	is applied to all the elements of the data
       array.

       Array references	within the data	will be	treated	as columns. This
       allows you to write 2D arrays of	data in	one go.	For example:

	   @eec	=  (
		       ['maggie', 'milly', 'molly', 'may'  ],
		       [13,	  14,	   15,	    16	   ],
		       ['shell',  'star',  'crab',  'stone']
		   );

	   $worksheet->write_row('A1', \@eec);

       Would produce a worksheet as follows:

	    -----------------------------------------------------------
	   |   |    A	 |    B	   |	C    |	  D    |    E	 | ...
	    -----------------------------------------------------------
	   | 1 | maggie	 | 13	   | shell   | ...     |  ...	 | ...
	   | 2 | milly	 | 14	   | star    | ...     |  ...	 | ...
	   | 3 | molly	 | 15	   | crab    | ...     |  ...	 | ...
	   | 4 | may	 | 16	   | stone   | ...     |  ...	 | ...
	   | 5 | ...	 | ...	   | ...     | ...     |  ...	 | ...
	   | 6 | ...	 | ...	   | ...     | ...     |  ...	 | ...

       To write	the data in a row-column order refer to	the "write_col()"
       method below.

       Any "undef" values in the data will be ignored unless a format is
       applied to the data, in which case a formatted blank cell will be
       written.	In either case the appropriate row or column value will	still
       be incremented.

       To find out more	about array references refer to	"perlref" and
       "perlreftut" in the main	Perl documentation. To find out	more about 2D
       arrays or "lists	of lists" refer	to "perllol".

       The "write_row()" method	returns	the first error	encountered when
       writing the elements of the data	or zero	if no errors were encountered.
       See the return values described for the "write()" method	above.

       See also	the "write_arrays.pl" program in the "examples"	directory of
       the distro.

       The "write_row()" method	allows the following idiomatic conversion of a
       text file to an Excel file:

	   #!/usr/bin/perl -w

	   use strict;
	   use Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML;

	   my $workbook	 = Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML->new('file.xls');
	   my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet();

	   open	INPUT, 'file.txt' or die "Couldn't open	file: $!";

	   $worksheet->write($.-1, 0, [split]) while <INPUT>;

   write_col($row, $column, $array_ref,	$format)
       The "write_col()" method	can be used to write a 1D or 2D	array of data
       in one go. This is useful for converting	the results of a database
       query into an Excel worksheet. You must pass a reference	to the array
       of data rather than the array itself. The "write()" method is then
       called for each element of the data. For	example:

	   @array      = ('awk', 'gawk', 'mawk');
	   $array_ref  = \@array;

	   $worksheet->write_col(0, 0, $array_ref);

	   # The above example is equivalent to:
	   $worksheet->write(0,	0, $array[0]);
	   $worksheet->write(1,	0, $array[1]);
	   $worksheet->write(2,	0, $array[2]);

       As with all of the write	methods	the $format parameter is optional. If
       a format	is specified it	is applied to all the elements of the data
       array.

       Array references	within the data	will be	treated	as rows. This allows
       you to write 2D arrays of data in one go. For example:

	   @eec	=  (
		       ['maggie', 'milly', 'molly', 'may'  ],
		       [13,	  14,	   15,	    16	   ],
		       ['shell',  'star',  'crab',  'stone']
		   );

	   $worksheet->write_col('A1', \@eec);

       Would produce a worksheet as follows:

	    -----------------------------------------------------------
	   |   |    A	 |    B	   |	C    |	  D    |    E	 | ...
	    -----------------------------------------------------------
	   | 1 | maggie	 | milly   | molly   | may     |  ...	 | ...
	   | 2 | 13	 | 14	   | 15	     | 16      |  ...	 | ...
	   | 3 | shell	 | star	   | crab    | stone   |  ...	 | ...
	   | 4 | ...	 | ...	   | ...     | ...     |  ...	 | ...
	   | 5 | ...	 | ...	   | ...     | ...     |  ...	 | ...
	   | 6 | ...	 | ...	   | ...     | ...     |  ...	 | ...

       To write	the data in a column-row order refer to	the "write_row()"
       method above.

       Any "undef" values in the data will be ignored unless a format is
       applied to the data, in which case a formatted blank cell will be
       written.	In either case the appropriate row or column value will	still
       be incremented.

       As noted	above the "write()" method can be used as a synonym for
       "write_row()" and "write_row()" handles nested array refs as columns.
       Therefore, the following	two method calls are equivalent	although the
       more explicit call to "write_col()" would be preferable for
       maintainability:

	   $worksheet->write_col('A1', $array_ref    );	# Write	a column of data
	   $worksheet->write(	 'A1', [ $array_ref ]);	# Same thing

       To find out more	about array references refer to	"perlref" and
       "perlreftut" in the main	Perl documentation. To find out	more about 2D
       arrays or "lists	of lists" refer	to "perllol".

       The "write_col()" method	returns	the first error	encountered when
       writing the elements of the data	or zero	if no errors were encountered.
       See the return values described for the "write()" method	above.

       See also	the "write_arrays.pl" program in the "examples"	directory of
       the distro.

   write_date_time($row, $col, $date_string, $format)
       The "write_date_time()" method can be used to write a date or time to
       the cell	specified by $row and $column:

	   $worksheet->write_date_time('A1', '2004-05-13T23:20', $date_format);

       The $date_string	should be in the following format:

	   yyyy-mm-ddThh:mm:ss.sss

       This conforms to	an ISO8601 date	but it should be noted that the	full
       range of	ISO8601	formats	are not	supported.

       The following variations	on the $date_string parameter are permitted:

	   yyyy-mm-ddThh:mm:ss.sss	   # Standard format
	   yyyy-mm-ddT			   # No	time
		     Thh:mm:ss.sss	   # No	date
	   yyyy-mm-ddThh:mm:ss.sssZ	   # Additional	Z (but not time	zones)
	   yyyy-mm-ddThh:mm:ss		   # No	fractional seconds
	   yyyy-mm-ddThh:mm		   # No	seconds

       Note that the "T" is required in	all cases.

       A date should always have a $format, otherwise it will appear as	a
       number, see "CELL FORMATTING" and "DATES	IN EXCEL". Here	is a typical
       example:

	   my $date_format = $workbook->add_format(num_format => 'mm/dd/yy');
	   $worksheet->write_date_time('A1', '2004-05-13T23:20', $date_format);

       Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML also allows Excel's newer text description
       formats:

	   General Date
	   Short Date
	   Medium Date
	   Long	Date
	   Short Time
	   Medium Time
	   Long	Time

	   my $date_format = $workbook->add_format(num_format => 'Short	Date');
	   $worksheet->write_date_time('A1', '2004-05-13T23:20', $date_format);

       Valid dates should be in	the range 1900-01-01 to	9999-12-31, for	the
       1900 epoch. As with Excel, dates	outside	these ranges will be written
       as a string. The	1904 epoch is not supported in this release.

       To write	a time with a zero date	use the	date "1899-12-31". This	is an
       Excel quirk. See	"DATES IN EXCEL".

	   $worksheet->write_date_time('A1', '1899-12-31T23:20', $date_format);

       See also	the "date_time.pl" program in the "examples" directory of the
       distro.

   write_url($row, $col, $url, $format,	$string, $tip)
       Write a hyperlink to a URL in the cell specified	by $row	and $column.
       The hyperlink is	comprised of two elements: the visible label and the
       invisible link. The visible label is the	same as	the link unless	an
       alternative string is specified.

       The parameters $format, $string and $tip	are optional. Note however
       that without a $format the url will not appear with the standard	blue
       underline. This behaviour is different from older versions of
       "Spreadsheet::WriteExcel". To achieve this effect you must add an
       explicit	format:

	   my $format =	$workbook->add_format(color => 'blue', underline => 1);

       You can add a tooltip to	the url	by specifying the $tip parameter. This
       is feature isn't	supported in "Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML".

       There are four web style	URI's supported: "http://", "https://",
       "ftp://"	and  "mailto:":

	   $worksheet->write_url(0, 0, 'ftp://www.perl.org/',  $format		  );
	   $worksheet->write_url(1, 0, 'http://www.perl.com/', $format 'Perl home');
	   $worksheet->write_url('A3', 'http://www.perl.com/', $format		  );
	   $worksheet->write_url('A4', 'http://www.perl.com/', 'Perl home',$format);
	   $worksheet->write_url('A5', 'mailto:jmcnamara@cpan.org'		  );

       There are two local URIs	supported: "internal:" and "external:".	These
       are used	for hyperlinks to internal worksheet references	or external
       workbook	and worksheet references:

	   $worksheet->write_url('A6',	'internal:Sheet2!A1',	     $format);
	   $worksheet->write_url('A7',	'internal:Sheet2!A1:B2',     $format);
	   $worksheet->write_url('A8',	q{internal:'Sales Data'!A1}, $format);
	   $worksheet->write_url('A9',	'external:c:\temp\foo.xls',  $format);
	   $worksheet->write_url('A10',	'external:c:\temp\foo.xls#Sheet2!A1');
	   $worksheet->write_url('A11',	'external:\\\\NETWORK\share\foo.xls');

       Note that the relative style directory link such	as " ..\foo.xls" is
       not supported by	Excel XML. You must use	an absolute directory link
       instead.

       All of the these	URI types are recognised by the	"write()" method, see
       above.

       Worksheet references are	typically of the form "Sheet1!A1". You can
       also refer to a worksheet range using the standard Excel	notation:
       "Sheet1!A1:B2".

       In external links the workbook and worksheet name must be separated by
       the "#" character: "external:Workbook.xls#Sheet1!A1'".

       You can also link to a named range in the target	worksheet. For example
       say you have a named range called "my_name" in the workbook
       "c:\temp\foo.xls" you could link	to it as follows:

	   $worksheet->write_url('A14',	'external:c:\temp\foo.xls#my_name');

       Note, you cannot	currently create named ranges with
       "Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML".

       Excel requires that worksheet names containing spaces or	non
       alphanumeric characters are single quoted as follows "'Sales Data'!A1".
       If you need to do this in a single quoted string	then you can either
       escape the single quotes	"\'" or	use the	quote operator "q{}" as
       described in "perlop" in	the main Perl documentation.

       Links to	network	files are also supported. MS/Novell Network files
       normally	begin with two back slashes as follows "\\NETWORK\etc".	In
       order to	generate this in a single or double quoted string you will
       have to escape the backslashes,	'\\\\NETWORK\etc'.

       If you are using	double quote strings then you should be	careful	to
       escape anything that looks like a metacharacter.	For more information
       see "perlfaq5: Why can't	I use "C:\temp\foo" in DOS paths?".

       Finally,	you can	avoid most of these quoting problems by	using forward
       slashes.	These are translated internally	to backslashes:

	   $worksheet->write_url('A14',	"external:c:/temp/foo.xls"	       );
	   $worksheet->write_url('A15',	'external://NETWORK/share/foo.xls'     );

       See also, the note about	"Cell notation".

   write_url_range($row1, $col1, $row2,	$col2, $url, $string, $format)
       Note: This method is not	yet supported by Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML.
       See Spreadsheet::WriteExcel if you need this feature.

       This method is essentially the same as the "write_url()"	method
       described above.	The main difference is that you	can specify a link for
       a range of cells:

	   $worksheet->write_url(0, 0, 0, 3, 'ftp://www.perl.org/'		);
	   $worksheet->write_url(1, 0, 0, 3, 'http://www.perl.com/', 'Perl home');
	   $worksheet->write_url('A3:D3',    'internal:Sheet2!A1'		);
	   $worksheet->write_url('A4:D4',    'external:c:\temp\foo.xls'		);

       This method is generally	only required when used	in conjunction with
       merged cells. See the "merge_range()" method and	the "merge" property
       of a Format object, "CELL FORMATTING".

       There is	no way to force	this behaviour through the "write()" method.

       The parameters $string and the $format are optional and their position
       is interchangeable. However, they are applied only to the first cell in
       the range.

       See also, the note about	"Cell notation".

   write_formula($row, $column,	$formula, $format)
       Write a formula or function to the cell specified by $row and $column:

	   $worksheet->write_formula(0,	0, '=$B$3 + B4'	 );
	   $worksheet->write_formula(1,	0, '=SIN(PI()/4)');
	   $worksheet->write_formula(2,	0, '=SUM(B1:B5)' );
	   $worksheet->write_formula('A4', '=IF(A3>1,"Yes", "No")'   );
	   $worksheet->write_formula('A5', '=AVERAGE(1,	2, 3, 4)'    );
	   $worksheet->write_formula('A6', '=DATEVALUE("1-Jan-2001")');

       Array formulas are also supported:

	   $worksheet->write_formula('A7', '{=SUM(A1:B1*A2:B2)}'     );

       See also	the "write_array_formula()" method below.

       Note: Array formulas are	not supported by Spreadsheet::WriteExcel.

       See the note about "Cell	notation". For more information	about writing
       Excel formulas see "FORMULAS AND	FUNCTIONS IN EXCEL"

   write_array_formula($first_row, $first_col, $last_row, $last_col, $formula,
       $format)
       Write an	array formula to a cell	range. In Excel	an array formula is a
       formula that performs a calculation on a	set of values. It can return a
       single value or a range of values.

       An array	formula	is indicated by	a pair of braces around	the formula:
       "{=SUM(A1:B1*A2:B2)}".  If the array formula returns a single value
       then the	$first_	and $last_ parameters should be	the same:

	   $worksheet->write_array_formula('A1:A1', '{=SUM(B1:C1*B2:C2)}');

       It this case however it is easier to just use the "write_formula()" or
       "write()" methods:

	   # Same as above but more concise.
	   $worksheet->write('A1', '{=SUM(B1:C1*B2:C2)}');
	   $worksheet->write_formula('A1', '{=SUM(B1:C1*B2:C2)}');

       For array formulas that return a	range of values	you must specify the
       range that the return values will be written to:

	   $worksheet->write_array_formula('A1:A3',    '{=TREND(C1:C3,B1:B3)}');
	   $worksheet->write_array_formula(0, 0, 2, 0, '{=TREND(C1:C3,B1:B3)}');

       Note: Array formulas are	not supported by Spreadsheet::WriteExcel.

   store_formula($formula)
       This method isn't used by Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML. It	is only
       required	by Spreadsheet::WriteExcel.

   repeat_formula($row,	$col, $formula,	$format, ($pattern => $replace,	...))
       This method isn't used by Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML. It	is only
       required	by Spreadsheet::WriteExcel.

   write_comment($row, $column,	$string)
       Note: This method is not	yet supported by Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML.
       See Spreadsheet::WriteExcel if you need this feature.

       The "write_comment()" method is used to add a comment to	a cell.	A cell
       comment is indicated in Excel by	a small	red triangle in	the upper
       right-hand corner of the	cell. Moving the cursor	over the red triangle
       will cause the comment to appear.

       The following example shows how to add a	comment	to a cell:

	   $worksheet->write("C3", "Hello");
	   $worksheet->write_comment("C3", "This is a comment.");

       The cell	comment	can be up to 30,000 characters in length.

       No formatting of	the text or the	text box is possible with the Excel 5
       version of this method.

       Note: the "write_comment()" method was previously supplied as an
       external	example	program. If you	are currently using that method	you
       will get	a warning about	subroutines being redefined:

	   Subroutine write_comment redefined at ... line ...
	   Subroutine _store_comment  redefined	at ... line ...

       You can safely delete the user defined "write_comment()"	code from your
       old programs and	use the	module defined method instead.

   add_write_handler($re, $code_ref)
       This method is used to extend the Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML write()
       method to handle	user defined data.

       If you refer to the section on "write()"	above you will see that	it
       acts as an alias	for several more specific "write_*" methods. However,
       it doesn't always act in	exactly	the way	that you would like it to.

       One solution is to filter the input data	yourself and call the
       appropriate "write_*" method. Another approach is to use	the
       "add_write_handler()" method to add your	own automated behaviour	to
       "write()".

       The "add_write_handler()" method	take two arguments, $re, a regular
       expression to match incoming data and $code_ref a callback function to
       handle the matched data:

	   $worksheet->add_write_handler(qr/^\d\d\d\d$/, \&my_write);

       (In the these examples the "qr" operator	is used	to quote the regular
       expression strings, see perlop for more details).

       The method is used as follows. say you wished to	write 7	digit ID
       numbers as a string so that any leading zeros were preserved*, you
       could do	something like the following:

	   $worksheet->add_write_handler(qr/^\d{7}$/, \&write_my_id);

	   sub write_my_id {
	       my $worksheet = shift;
	       return $worksheet->write_string(@_);
	   }

       * You could also	use the	"keep_leading_zeros()" method for this.

       Then if you call	"write()" with an appropriate string it	will be
       handled automatically:

	   # Writes 0000000. It	would normally be written as a number; 0.
	   $worksheet->write('A1', '0000000');

       The callback function will receive a reference to the calling worksheet
       and all of the other arguments that were	passed to "write()". The
       callback	will see an @_ argument	list that looks	like the following:

	   $_[0]   A ref to the	calling	worksheet. *
	   $_[1]   Zero	based row number.
	   $_[2]   Zero	based column number.
	   $_[3]   A number or string or token.
	   $_[4]   A format ref	if any.
	   $_[5]   Any other arguments.
	   ...

	   *  It is good style to shift	this off the list so the @_ is the same
	      as the argument list seen	by write().

       Your callback should "return()" the return value	of the "write_*"
       method that was called or "undef" to indicate that you rejected the
       match and want "write()"	to continue as normal.

       So for example if you wished to apply the previous filter only to ID
       values that occur in the	first column you could modify your callback
       function	as follows:

	   sub write_my_id {
	       my $worksheet = shift;
	       my $col	     = $_[1];

	       if ($col	== 0) {
		   return $worksheet->write_string(@_);
	       }
	       else {
		   # Reject the	match and return control to write()
		   return undef;
	       }
	   }

       Now, you	will get different behaviour for the first column and other
       columns:

	   $worksheet->write('A1', '0000000'); # Writes	0000000
	   $worksheet->write('B1', '0000000'); # Writes	0

       You may add more	than one handler in which case they will be called in
       the order that they were	added.

       Note, the "add_write_handler()" method is particularly suited for
       handling	dates.

       See the "write_handler 1-4" programs in the "examples" directory	for
       further examples.

   insert_bitmap($row, $col, $filename,	$x, $y,	$scale_x, $scale_y)
       Embedded	images are not supported by Excel XML. See
       Spreadsheet::WriteExcel if you need this	feature.

   get_name()
       The "get_name()"	method is used to retrieve the name of a worksheet.
       For example:

	   foreach my $sheet ($workbook->sheets()) {
	       print $sheet->get_name();
	   }

   activate()
       Note: This method is not	yet supported by Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML.
       See Spreadsheet::WriteExcel if you need this feature.

       The "activate()"	method is used to specify which	worksheet is initially
       visible in a multi-sheet	workbook:

	   $worksheet1 = $workbook->add_worksheet('To');
	   $worksheet2 = $workbook->add_worksheet('the');
	   $worksheet3 = $workbook->add_worksheet('wind');

	   $worksheet3->activate();

       This is similar to the Excel VBA	activate method. More than one
       worksheet can be	selected via the "select()" method, however only one
       worksheet can be	active.	The default value is the first worksheet.

   select()
       Note: This method is not	yet supported by Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML.
       See Spreadsheet::WriteExcel if you need this feature.

       The "select()" method is	used to	indicate that a	worksheet is selected
       in a multi-sheet	workbook:

	   $worksheet1->activate();
	   $worksheet2->select();
	   $worksheet3->select();

       A selected worksheet has	its tab	highlighted. Selecting worksheets is a
       way of grouping them together so	that, for example, several worksheets
       could be	printed	in one go. A worksheet that has	been activated via the
       "activate()" method will	also appear as selected. You probably won't
       need to use the "select()" method very often.

   set_first_sheet()
       Note: This method is not	yet supported by Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML.
       See Spreadsheet::WriteExcel if you need this feature.

       The "activate()"	method determines which	worksheet is initially
       selected. However, if there are a large number of worksheets the
       selected	worksheet may not appear on the	screen.	To avoid this you can
       select which is the leftmost visible worksheet using
       "set_first_sheet()":

	   for (1..20) {
	       $workbook->add_worksheet;
	   }

	   $worksheet21	= $workbook->add_worksheet();
	   $worksheet22	= $workbook->add_worksheet();

	   $worksheet21->set_first_sheet();
	   $worksheet22->activate();

       This method is not required very	often. The default value is the	first
       worksheet.

   protect($password)
       The "protect()" method is used to protect a worksheet from
       modification:

	   $worksheet->protect();

       It can be turned	off in Excel via the "Tools->Protection->Unprotect
       Sheet" menu command.

       The "protect()" method also has the effect of enabling a	cell's
       "locked"	and "hidden" properties	if they	have been set. A "locked" cell
       cannot be edited. A "hidden" cell will display the results of a formula
       but not the formula itself. In Excel a cell's locked property is	on by
       default.

	   # Set some format properties
	   my $unlocked	 = $workbook->add_format(locked	=> 0);
	   my $hidden	 = $workbook->add_format(hidden	=> 1);

	   # Enable worksheet protection
	   $worksheet->protect();

	   # This cell cannot be edited, it is locked by default
	   $worksheet->write('A1', '=1+2');

	   # This cell can be edited
	   $worksheet->write('A2', '=1+2', $unlocked);

	   # The formula in this cell isn't visible
	   $worksheet->write('A3', '=1+2', $hidden);

       See also	the "set_locked" and "set_hidden" format methods in "CELL
       FORMATTING".

       You can optionally add a	password to the	worksheet protection:

	   $worksheet->protect('drowssap');

       Note, the worksheet level password in Excel provides very weak
       protection. It does not encrypt your data in any	way and	it is very
       easy to deactivate. Therefore, do not use the above method if you wish
       to protect sensitive data or calculations. However, before you get
       worried,	Excel's	own workbook level password protection does provide
       strong encryption in Excel 97+. For technical reasons this will never
       be supported by "Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML".

   set_selection($first_row, $first_col, $last_row, $last_col)
       Note: This method is not	yet supported by Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML.
       See Spreadsheet::WriteExcel if you need this feature.

       This method can be used to specify which	cell or	cells are selected in
       a worksheet. The	most common requirement	is to select a single cell, in
       which case $last_row and	$last_col can be omitted. The active cell
       within a	selected range is determined by	the order in which $first and
       $last are specified. It is also possible	to specify a cell or a range
       using A1	notation. See the note about "Cell notation".

       Examples:

	   $worksheet1->set_selection(3, 3);	   # 1.	Cell D4.
	   $worksheet2->set_selection(3, 3, 6, 6); # 2.	Cells D4 to G7.
	   $worksheet3->set_selection(6, 6, 3, 3); # 3.	Cells G7 to D4.
	   $worksheet4->set_selection('D4');	   # Same as 1.
	   $worksheet5->set_selection('D4:G7');	   # Same as 2.
	   $worksheet6->set_selection('G7:D4');	   # Same as 3.

       The default cell	selections is (0, 0), 'A1'.

   set_row($row, $height, $format, $hidden)
       This method can be used to change the default properties	of a row. All
       parameters apart	from $row are optional.

       The most	common use for this method is to change	the height of a	row:

	   $worksheet->set_row(0, 20); # Row 1 height set to 20

       If you wish to set the format without changing the height you can pass
       "undef" as the height parameter:

	   $worksheet->set_row(0, undef, $format);

       The $format parameter will be applied to	any cells in the row that
       don't have a format. For	example

	   $worksheet->set_row(0, undef, $format1);    # Set the format	for row	1
	   $worksheet->write('A1', 'Hello');	       # Defaults to $format1
	   $worksheet->write('B1', 'Hello', $format2); # Keeps $format2

       If you wish to define a row format in this way you should call the
       method before any calls to "write()". Calling it	afterwards will
       overwrite any format that was previously	specified.

       The $hidden parameter should be set to 1	if you wish to hide a row.
       This can	be used, for example, to hide intermediary steps in a
       complicated calculation:

	   $worksheet->set_row(0, 20,	 $format, 1);
	   $worksheet->set_row(1, undef, undef,	  1);

       Note: Spreadsheet::WriteExcel supports another parameter	in relation to
       "OUTLINES AND GROUPING IN EXCEL". This feature is not supported by
       Excel XML.

   set_column($first_col, $last_col, $width, $format, $hidden)
       This method can be used to change the default properties	of a single
       column or a range of columns. All parameters apart from $first_col and
       $last_col are optional.

       If "set_column()" is applied to a single	column the value of $first_col
       and $last_col should be the same. In the	case where $last_col is	zero
       it is set to the	same value as $first_col.

       It is also possible, and	generally clearer, to specify a	column range
       using the form of A1 notation used for columns. See the note about
       "Cell notation".

       Examples:

	   $worksheet->set_column(0, 0,	 20); #	Column	A   width set to 20
	   $worksheet->set_column(1, 3,	 30); #	Columns	B-D width set to 30
	   $worksheet->set_column('E:E', 20); #	Column	E   width set to 20
	   $worksheet->set_column('F:H', 30); #	Columns	F-H width set to 30

       The width corresponds to	the column width value that is specified in
       Excel. It is approximately equal	to the length of a string in the
       default font of Arial 10. It is possible	to set "AutoFit" for a column
       in the ExcelXML file format, but	it only	applies	to numbers and dates
       and not to strings.

       As usual	the $format parameter is optional, for additional information,
       see "CELL FORMATTING". If you wish to set the format without changing
       the width you can pass "undef" as the width parameter:

	   $worksheet->set_column(0, 0,	undef, $format);

       The $format parameter will be applied to	any cells in the column	that
       don't have a format. For	example

	   $worksheet->set_column('A:A', undef,	$format1); # Set format	for col	1
	   $worksheet->write('A1', 'Hello');		   # Defaults to $format1
	   $worksheet->write('A2', 'Hello', $format2);	   # Keeps $format2

       If you wish to define a column format in	this way you should call the
       method before any calls to "write()". If	you call it afterwards it
       won't have any effect.

       A default row format takes precedence over a default column format

	   $worksheet->set_row(0, undef,	$format1); # Set format	for row	1
	   $worksheet->set_column('A:A', undef,	$format2); # Set format	for col	1
	   $worksheet->write('A1', 'Hello');		   # Defaults to $format1
	   $worksheet->write('A2', 'Hello');		   # Defaults to $format2

       The $hidden parameter should be set to 1	if you wish to hide a column.
       This can	be used, for example, to hide intermediary steps in a
       complicated calculation:

	   $worksheet->set_column('D:D', 20,	$format, 1);
	   $worksheet->set_column('E:E', undef,	undef,	 1);

       Note: Spreadsheet::WriteExcel supports another parameter	in relation to
       "OUTLINES AND GROUPING IN EXCEL". This feature is not supported by
       Excel XML.

   outline_settings($visible, $symbols_below, $symbols_right, $auto_style)
       Note: Outlines and Grouping is not supported by Excel XML. See
       Spreadsheet::WriteExcel if you need this	feature.

       The "outline_settings()"	method is used to control the appearance of
       outlines	in Excel. Outlines are described in "OUTLINES AND GROUPING IN
       EXCEL".

       The $visible parameter is used to control whether or not	outlines are
       visible.	Setting	this parameter to 0 will cause all outlines on the
       worksheet to be hidden. They can	be unhidden in Excel by	means of the
       "Show Outline Symbols" command button. The default setting is 1 for
       visible outlines.

	   $worksheet->outline_settings(0);

       The $symbols_below parameter is used to control whether the row outline
       symbol will appear above	or below the outline level bar.	The default
       setting is 1 for	symbols	to appear below	the outline level bar.

       The "symbols_right" parameter is	used to	control	whether	the column
       outline symbol will appear to the left or the right of the outline
       level bar. The default setting is 1 for symbols to appear to the	right
       of the outline level bar.

       The $auto_style parameter is used to control whether the	automatic
       outline generator in Excel uses automatic styles	when creating an
       outline.	This has no effect on a	file generated by
       "Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML" but	it does	have an	effect on how the
       worksheet behaves after it is created. The default setting is 0 for
       "Automatic Styles" to be	turned off.

       The default settings for	all of these parameters	correspond to Excel's
       default parameters.

       The worksheet parameters	controlled by "outline_settings()" are rarely
       used.

   freeze_panes($row, $col, $top_row, $left_col)
       Note: This method is not	yet supported by Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML.
       See Spreadsheet::WriteExcel if you need this feature.

       This method can be used to divide a worksheet into horizontal or
       vertical	regions	known as panes and to also "freeze" these panes	so
       that the	splitter bars are not visible. This is the same	as the
       "Window->Freeze Panes" menu command in Excel

       The parameters $row and $col are	used to	specify	the location of	the
       split. It should	be noted that the split	is specified at	the top	or
       left of a cell and that the method uses zero based indexing. Therefore
       to freeze the first row of a worksheet it is necessary to specify the
       split at	row 2 (which is	1 as the zero-based index). This might lead
       you to think that you are using a 1 based index but this	is not the
       case.

       You can set one of the $row and $col parameters as zero if you do not
       want either a vertical or horizontal split.

       Examples:

	   $worksheet->freeze_panes(1, 0); # Freeze the	first row
	   $worksheet->freeze_panes('A2'); # Same using	A1 notation
	   $worksheet->freeze_panes(0, 1); # Freeze the	first column
	   $worksheet->freeze_panes('B1'); # Same using	A1 notation
	   $worksheet->freeze_panes(1, 2); # Freeze first row and first	2 columns
	   $worksheet->freeze_panes('C2'); # Same using	A1 notation

       The parameters $top_row and $left_col are optional. They	are used to
       specify the top-most or left-most visible row or	column in the
       scrolling region	of the panes. For example to freeze the	first row and
       to have the scrolling region begin at row twenty:

	   $worksheet->freeze_panes(1, 0, 20, 0);

       You cannot use A1 notation for the $top_row and $left_col parameters.

       See also	the "panes.pl" program in the "examples" directory of the
       distribution.

   split_panes($y, $x, $top_row, $left_col)
       This method can be used to divide a worksheet into horizontal or
       vertical	regions	known as panes.	This method is different from the
       "freeze_panes()"	method in that the splits between the panes will be
       visible to the user and each pane will have its own scroll bars.

       The parameters $y and $x	are used to specify the	vertical and
       horizontal position of the split. The units for $y and $x are the same
       as those	used by	Excel to specify row height and	column width. However,
       the vertical and	horizontal units are different from each other.
       Therefore you must specify the $y and $x	parameters in terms of the row
       heights and column widths that you have set or the default values which
       are 12.75 for a row and	8.43 for a column.

       You can set one of the $y and $x	parameters as zero if you do not want
       either a	vertical or horizontal split. The parameters $top_row and
       $left_col are optional. They are	used to	specify	the top-most or	left-
       most visible row	or column in the bottom-right pane.

       Example:

	   $worksheet->split_panes(12.75, 0,	1, 0); # First row
	   $worksheet->split_panes(0,	  8.43,	0, 1); # First column
	   $worksheet->split_panes(12.75, 8.43,	1, 1); # First row and column

       You cannot use A1 notation with this method.

       See also	the "freeze_panes()" method and	the "panes.pl" program in the
       "examples" directory of the distribution.

       Note: This "split_panes()" method was called "thaw_panes()" in older
       versions. The older name	is still available for backwards
       compatibility.

   merge_range($first_row, $first_col, $last_row, $last_col, $token, $format)
       Merging cells can be achieved by	setting	the "merge" property of	a
       Format object, see "CELL	FORMATTING". However, this only	allows simple
       Excel5 style horizontal merging which Excel refers to as	"center	across
       selection".

       The "merge_range()" method allows you to	do Excel97+ style formatting
       where the cells can contain other types of alignment in addition	to the
       merging:

	   my $format =	$workbook->add_format(
					       border  => 6,
					       valign  => 'vcenter',
					       align   => 'center',
					     );

	   $worksheet->merge_range('B3:D4', 'Vertical and horizontal', $format);

       "merge_range()" writes its $token argument using	the worksheet
       "write()" method. Therefore it will handle numbers, strings, formulas
       or urls as required.

       Setting the "merge" property of the format isn't	required when you are
       using "merge_range()". In fact using it will exclude the	use of any
       other horizontal	alignment option.

       The full	possibilities of this method are shown in the "merge3.pl",
       "merge4.pl" and "merge5.pl" programs in the "examples" directory	of the
       distribution.

   set_zoom($scale)
       Note: This method is not	yet supported by Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML.
       See Spreadsheet::WriteExcel if you need this feature.

       Set the worksheet zoom factor in	the range "10 <= $scale	<= 400":

	   $worksheet1->set_zoom(50);
	   $worksheet2->set_zoom(75);
	   $worksheet3->set_zoom(300);
	   $worksheet4->set_zoom(400);

       The default zoom	factor is 100. You cannot zoom to "Selection" because
       it is calculated	by Excel at run-time.

       Note, "set_zoom()" does not affect the scale of the printed page. For
       that you	should use "set_print_scale()".

   autofilter($first_row, $first_col, $last_row, $last_col)
       This method allows an autofilter	to be added to a worksheet. An
       autofilter is a way of adding drop down lists to	the headers of a 2D
       range of	worksheet data.	This is	turn allow users to filter the data
       based on	simple criteria	so that	some data is shown and some is hidden.

       To add an autofilter to a worksheet:

	   $worksheet->autofilter(0, 0,	10, 3);
	   $worksheet->autofilter('A1:D11');	# Same as above	in A1 notation.

       Filter conditions can be	applied	using the "filter_column()" method.

       See the "autofilter.pl" program in the examples directory of the	distro
       for a more detailed example.

   filter_column($column, $expression)
       The "filter_column" method can be used to filter	columns	in a
       autofilter range	based on simple	conditions.

       The conditions for the filter are specified using simple	expressions:

	   $worksheet->filter_column('A', 'x > 2000');
	   $worksheet->filter_column('B', 'x > 2000 and	x < 5000');

       The $column parameter can either	be a zero indexed column number	or a
       string column name.

       The following operators are available:

	   Operator	   Synonyms
	      ==	   =   eq  =~
	      !=	   <>  ne  !=
	      >
	      <
	      >=
	      <=

	      and	   &&
	      or	   ||

       The operator synonyms are just syntactic	sugar to make you more
       comfortable using the expressions. It is	important to remember that the
       expressions will	be interpreted by Excel	and not	by perl.

       An expression can comprise a single statement or	two statements
       separated by the	"and" and "or" operators. For example:

	   'x <	 2000'
	   'x >	 2000'
	   'x == 2000'
	   'x >	 2000 and x <  5000'
	   'x == 2000 or  x == 5000'

       Excel also allows some simple string matching operations:

	   'x =~ b*'   # begins	with b
	   'x !~ b*'   # doesn't begin with b
	   'x =~ *b'   # ends with b
	   'x !~ *b'   # doesn't end with b
	   'x =~ *b*'  # contains b
	   'x !~ *b*'  # doesn't contains b

       You can also use	"*" to match any character or number and "?" to	match
       any single character or number. No other	regular	expression quantifier
       is supported by Excel's filters.	(Remember again	that the expression is
       being interpreted by Excel and not by perl).

       The placeholder variable	"x" in the above examples can be replaced by
       any simple string. The actual placeholder name is ignored internally so
       the following are all equivalent:

	   'x	  < 2000'
	   'col	  < 2000'
	   'Price < 2000'

       If you have problems with an expression,	use Excel to create the
       condition that you want,	save the file in XML format and	examine	the
       output.

       Also, note that a filter	condition can only be applied to a column in a
       range specified by the "autofilter()" Worksheet method.

       See the "autofilter.pl" program in the examples directory of the	distro
       for a more detailed example.

PAGE SET-UP METHODS
       Page set-up methods affect the way that a worksheet looks when it is
       printed.	They control features such as page headers and footers and
       margins.	These methods are really just standard worksheet methods. They
       are documented here in a	separate section for the sake of clarity.

       The following methods are available for page set-up:

	   set_landscape()
	   set_portrait()
	   set_paper()
	   center_horizontally()
	   center_vertically()
	   set_margins()
	   set_header()
	   set_footer()
	   repeat_rows()
	   repeat_columns()
	   hide_gridlines()
	   print_row_col_headers()
	   print_area()
	   fit_to_pages()
	   set_print_scale()
	   set_h_pagebreaks()
	   set_v_pagebreaks()

       A common	requirement when working with Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML is to
       apply the same page set-up features to all of the worksheets in a
       workbook. To do this you	can use	the "sheets()" method of the
       "workbook" class	to access the array of worksheets in a workbook:

	   foreach $worksheet ($workbook->sheets()) {
	      $worksheet->set_landscape();
	   }

   set_landscape()
       This method is used to set the orientation of a worksheet's printed
       page to landscape:

	   $worksheet->set_landscape();	# Landscape mode

   set_portrait()
       This method is used to set the orientation of a worksheet's printed
       page to portrait. The default worksheet orientation is portrait,	so you
       won't generally need to call this method.

	   $worksheet->set_portrait(); # Portrait mode

   set_paper($index)
       This method is used to set the paper format for the printed output of a
       worksheet. The following	paper styles are available:

	   Index   Paper format		   Paper size
	   =====   ============		   ==========
	     0	   Printer default	   -
	     1	   Letter		   8 1/2 x 11 in
	     2	   Letter Small		   8 1/2 x 11 in
	     3	   Tabloid		   11 x	17 in
	     4	   Ledger		   17 x	11 in
	     5	   Legal		   8 1/2 x 14 in
	     6	   Statement		   5 1/2 x 8 1/2 in
	     7	   Executive		   7 1/4 x 10 1/2 in
	     8	   A3			   297 x 420 mm
	     9	   A4			   210 x 297 mm
	    10	   A4 Small		   210 x 297 mm
	    11	   A5			   148 x 210 mm
	    12	   B4			   250 x 354 mm
	    13	   B5			   182 x 257 mm
	    14	   Folio		   8 1/2 x 13 in
	    15	   Quarto		   215 x 275 mm
	    16	   -			   10x14 in
	    17	   -			   11x17 in
	    18	   Note			   8 1/2 x 11 in
	    19	   Envelope  9		   3 7/8 x 8 7/8
	    20	   Envelope 10		   4 1/8 x 9 1/2
	    21	   Envelope 11		   4 1/2 x 10 3/8
	    22	   Envelope 12		   4 3/4 x 11
	    23	   Envelope 14		   5 x 11 1/2
	    24	   C size sheet		   -
	    25	   D size sheet		   -
	    26	   E size sheet		   -
	    27	   Envelope DL		   110 x 220 mm
	    28	   Envelope C3		   324 x 458 mm
	    29	   Envelope C4		   229 x 324 mm
	    30	   Envelope C5		   162 x 229 mm
	    31	   Envelope C6		   114 x 162 mm
	    32	   Envelope C65		   114 x 229 mm
	    33	   Envelope B4		   250 x 353 mm
	    34	   Envelope B5		   176 x 250 mm
	    35	   Envelope B6		   176 x 125 mm
	    36	   Envelope		   110 x 230 mm
	    37	   Monarch		   3.875 x 7.5 in
	    38	   Envelope		   3 5/8 x 6 1/2 in
	    39	   Fanfold		   14 7/8 x 11 in
	    40	   German Std Fanfold	   8 1/2 x 12 in
	    41	   German Legal	Fanfold	   8 1/2 x 13 in

       Note, it	is likely that not all of these	paper types will be available
       to the end user since it	will depend on the paper formats that the
       user's printer supports.	Therefore, it is best to stick to standard
       paper types.

	   $worksheet->set_paper(1); # US Letter
	   $worksheet->set_paper(9); # A4

       If you do not specify a paper type the worksheet	will print using the
       printer's default paper.

   center_horizontally()
       Center the worksheet data horizontally between the margins on the
       printed page:

	   $worksheet->center_horizontally();

   center_vertically()
       Center the worksheet data vertically between the	margins	on the printed
       page:

	   $worksheet->center_vertically();

   set_margins($inches)
       There are several methods available for setting the worksheet margins
       on the printed page:

	   set_margins()	# Set all margins to the same value
	   set_margins_LR()	# Set left and right margins to	the same value
	   set_margins_TB()	# Set top and bottom margins to	the same value
	   set_margin_left();	# Set left margin
	   set_margin_right();	# Set right margin
	   set_margin_top();	# Set top margin
	   set_margin_bottom();	# Set bottom margin

       All of these methods take a distance in inches as a parameter. Note: 1
       inch = 25.4mm. ;-) The default left and right margin is 0.75 inch. The
       default top and bottom margin is	1.00 inch.

   set_header($string, $margin)
       Headers and footers are generated using a $string which is a
       combination of plain text and control characters. The $margin parameter
       is optional.

       The available control character are:

	   Control	       Category		   Description
	   =======	       ========		   ===========
	   &L		       Justification	   Left
	   &C					   Center
	   &R					   Right

	   &P		       Information	   Page	number
	   &N					   Total number	of pages
	   &D					   Date
	   &T					   Time
	   &F					   File	name
	   &A					   Worksheet name
	   &Z					   Workbook path

	   &fontsize	       Font		   Font	size
	   &"font,style"			   Font	name and style
	   &U					   Single underline
	   &E					   Double underline
	   &S					   Strikethrough
	   &X					   Superscript
	   &Y					   Subscript

	   &&		       Miscellaneous	   Literal ampersand &

       Text in headers and footers can be justified (aligned) to the left,
       center and right	by prefixing the text with the control characters &L,
       &C and &R.

       For example (with ASCII art representation of the results):

	   $worksheet->set_header('&LHello');

	    ---------------------------------------------------------------
	   |								   |
	   | Hello							   |
	   |								   |

	   $worksheet->set_header('&CHello');

	    ---------------------------------------------------------------
	   |								   |
	   |			      Hello				   |
	   |								   |

	   $worksheet->set_header('&RHello');

	    ---------------------------------------------------------------
	   |								   |
	   |							     Hello |
	   |								   |

       For simple text,	if you do not specify any justification	the text will
       be centred. However, you	must prefix the	text with &C if	you specify a
       font name or any	other formatting:

	   $worksheet->set_header('Hello');

	    ---------------------------------------------------------------
	   |								   |
	   |			      Hello				   |
	   |								   |

       You can have text in each of the	justification regions:

	   $worksheet->set_header('&LCiao&CBello&RCielo');

	    ---------------------------------------------------------------
	   |								   |
	   | Ciao		      Bello			     Cielo |
	   |								   |

       The information control characters act as variables that	Excel will
       update as the workbook or worksheet changes. Times and dates are	in the
       users default format:

	   $worksheet->set_header('&CPage &P of	&N');

	    ---------------------------------------------------------------
	   |								   |
	   |			    Page 1 of 6				   |
	   |								   |

	   $worksheet->set_header('&CUpdated at	&T');

	    ---------------------------------------------------------------
	   |								   |
	   |			Updated	at 12:30 PM			   |
	   |								   |

       You can specify the font	size of	a section of the text by prefixing it
       with the	control	character &n where "n" is the font size:

	   $worksheet1->set_header('&C&30Hello Big'  );
	   $worksheet2->set_header('&C&10Hello Small');

       You can specify the font	of a section of	the text by prefixing it with
       the control sequence "&"font,style"" where "fontname" is	a font name
       such as "Courier	New" or	"Times New Roman" and "style" is one of	the
       standard	Windows	font descriptions: "Regular", "Italic",	"Bold" or
       "Bold Italic":

	   $worksheet1->set_header('&C&"Courier	New,Italic"Hello');
	   $worksheet2->set_header('&C&"Courier	New,Bold Italic"Hello');
	   $worksheet3->set_header('&C&"Times New Roman,Regular"Hello');

       It is possible to combine all of	these features together	to create
       sophisticated headers and footers. As an	aid to setting up complicated
       headers and footers you can record a page set-up	as a macro in Excel
       and look	at the format strings that VBA produces. Remember however that
       VBA uses	two double quotes "" to	indicate a single double quote.	For
       the last	example	above the equivalent VBA code looks like this:

	   .LeftHeader	 = ""
	   .CenterHeader = "&""Times New Roman,Regular""Hello"
	   .RightHeader	 = ""

       To include a single literal ampersand "&" in a header or	footer you
       should use a double ampersand "&&":

	   $worksheet1->set_header('&CCuriouser	&& Curiouser - Attorneys at Law');

       As stated above the margin parameter is optional. As with the other
       margins the value should	be in inches. The default header and footer
       margin is 0.50 inch. The	header and footer margin size can be set as
       follows:

	   $worksheet->set_header('&CHello', 0.75);

       The header and footer margins are independent of	the top	and bottom
       margins.

       Note, the header	or footer string must be less than 255 characters.
       Strings longer than this	will not be written and	a warning will be
       generated.

       See, also the "headers.pl" program in the "examples" directory of the
       distribution.

   set_footer()
       The syntax of the "set_footer()"	method is the same as "set_header()",
       see above.

   repeat_rows($first_row, $last_row)
       Set the number of rows to repeat	at the top of each printed page.

       For large Excel documents it is often desirable to have the first row
       or rows of the worksheet	print out at the top of	each page. This	can be
       achieved	by using the "repeat_rows()" method. The parameters $first_row
       and $last_row are zero based. The $last_row parameter is	optional if
       you only	wish to	specify	one row:

	   $worksheet1->repeat_rows(0);	   # Repeat the	first row
	   $worksheet2->repeat_rows(0, 1); # Repeat the	first two rows

   repeat_columns($first_col, $last_col)
       Set the columns to repeat at the	left hand side of each printed page.

       For large Excel documents it is often desirable to have the first
       column or columns of the	worksheet print	out at the left	hand side of
       each page. This can be achieved by using	the "repeat_columns()" method.
       The parameters $first_column and	$last_column are zero based. The
       $last_column parameter is optional if you only wish to specify one
       column. You can also specify the	columns	using A1 column	notation, see
       the note	about "Cell notation".

	   $worksheet1->repeat_columns(0);     # Repeat	the first column
	   $worksheet2->repeat_columns(0, 1);  # Repeat	the first two columns
	   $worksheet3->repeat_columns('A:A'); # Repeat	the first column
	   $worksheet4->repeat_columns('A:B'); # Repeat	the first two columns

   print_gridlines()
       Turn on printed gridlines. These	are off	by default in the Excel	XML
       format. *

	   $worksheet->print_gridlines();

       * They are also off by default in the Excel97+ versions but
       Spreadsheet::WriteExcel turns them on for backward compatibility
       reasons.

   hide_gridlines($option)
       This method is used to hide the gridlines on the	screen and printed
       page. Gridlines are the lines that divide the cells on a	worksheet. If
       you have	defined	your own cell borders you may wish to hide the default
       gridlines.

	   $worksheet->hide_gridlines();

       The following values of $option are valid:

	   0 : Don't hide gridlines
	   1 : Hide printed gridlines only
	   2 : Hide screen and printed gridlines

       If you don't supply an argument or use "undef" the default option is 1,
       i.e. only the printed gridlines are hidden.

   print_row_col_headers()
       Set the option to print the row and column headers on the printed page.

       An Excel	worksheet looks	something like the following;

	    ------------------------------------------
	   |   |   A   |   B   |   C   |   D   |  ...
	    ------------------------------------------
	   | 1 |       |       |       |       |  ...
	   | 2 |       |       |       |       |  ...
	   | 3 |       |       |       |       |  ...
	   | 4 |       |       |       |       |  ...
	   |...|  ...  |  ...  |  ...  |  ...  |  ...

       The headers are the letters and numbers at the top and the left of the
       worksheet. Since	these headers serve mainly as a	indication of position
       on the worksheet	they generally do not appear on	the printed page. If
       you wish	to have	them printed you can use the "print_row_col_headers()"
       method :

	   $worksheet->print_row_col_headers()

       Do not confuse these headers with page headers as described in the
       "set_header()" section above.

   print_area($first_row, $first_col, $last_row, $last_col)
       This method is used to specify the area of the worksheet	that will be
       printed.	All four parameters must be specified. You can also use	A1
       notation, see the note about "Cell notation".

	   $worksheet1->print_area('A1:H20');	 # Cells A1 to H20
	   $worksheet2->print_area(0, 0, 19, 7); # The same
	   $worksheet2->print_area('A:H');	 # Columns A to	H if rows have data

   fit_to_pages($width,	$height)
       The "fit_to_pages()" method is used to fit the printed area to a
       specific	number of pages	both vertically	and horizontally. If the
       printed area exceeds the	specified number of pages it will be scaled
       down to fit. This guarantees that the printed area will always appear
       on the specified	number of pages	even if	the page size or margins
       change.

	   $worksheet1->fit_to_pages(1,	1); # Fit to 1x1 pages
	   $worksheet2->fit_to_pages(2,	1); # Fit to 2x1 pages
	   $worksheet3->fit_to_pages(1,	2); # Fit to 1x2 pages

       The print area can be defined using the "print_area()" method as
       described above.

       A common	requirement is to fit the printed output to n pages wide but
       have the	height be as long as necessary.	To achieve this	set the
       $height to zero or leave	it blank:

	   $worksheet1->fit_to_pages(1,	0); # 1	page wide and as long as necessary
	   $worksheet2->fit_to_pages(1);    # The same

       Note that although it is	valid to use both "fit_to_pages()" and
       "set_print_scale()" on the same worksheet only one of these options can
       be active at a time. The	last method call made will set the active
       option.

       Note that "fit_to_pages()" will override	any manual page	breaks that
       are defined in the worksheet.

   set_print_scale($scale)
       Set the scale factor of the printed page. Scale factors in the range
       "10 <= $scale <=	400" are valid:

	   $worksheet1->set_print_scale(50);
	   $worksheet2->set_print_scale(75);
	   $worksheet3->set_print_scale(300);
	   $worksheet4->set_print_scale(400);

       The default scale factor	is 100.	Note, "set_print_scale()" does not
       affect the scale	of the visible page in Excel. For that you should use
       "set_zoom()".

       Note also that although it is valid to use both "fit_to_pages()"	and
       "set_print_scale()" on the same worksheet only one of these options can
       be active at a time. The	last method call made will set the active
       option.

   set_h_pagebreaks(@breaks)
       Add horizontal page breaks to a worksheet. A page break causes all the
       data that follows it to be printed on the next page. Horizontal page
       breaks act between rows.	To create a page break between rows 20 and 21
       you must	specify	the break at row 21. However in	zero index notation
       this is actually	row 20.	So you can pretend for a small while that you
       are using 1 index notation:

	   $worksheet1->set_h_pagebreaks(20); #	Break between row 20 and 21

       The "set_h_pagebreaks()"	method will accept a list of page breaks and
       you can call it more than once:

	   $worksheet2->set_h_pagebreaks( 20,  40,  60,	 80, 100); # Add breaks
	   $worksheet2->set_h_pagebreaks(120, 140, 160,	180, 200); # Add some more

       Note: If	you specify the	"fit to	page" option via the "fit_to_pages()"
       method it will override all manual page breaks.

       There is	a silent limitation of about 1000 horizontal page breaks per
       worksheet in line with an Excel internal	limitation.

   set_v_pagebreaks(@breaks)
       Add vertical page breaks	to a worksheet.	A page break causes all	the
       data that follows it to be printed on the next page. Vertical page
       breaks act between columns. To create a page break between columns 20
       and 21 you must specify the break at column 21. However in zero index
       notation	this is	actually column	20. So you can pretend for a small
       while that you are using	1 index	notation:

	   $worksheet1->set_v_pagebreaks(20); #	Break between column 20	and 21

       The "set_v_pagebreaks()"	method will accept a list of page breaks and
       you can call it more than once:

	   $worksheet2->set_v_pagebreaks( 20,  40,  60,	 80, 100); # Add breaks
	   $worksheet2->set_v_pagebreaks(120, 140, 160,	180, 200); # Add some more

       Note: If	you specify the	"fit to	page" option via the "fit_to_pages()"
       method it will override all manual page breaks.

CELL FORMATTING
       This section describes the methods and properties that are available
       for formatting cells in Excel. The properties of	a cell that can	be
       formatted include: fonts, colours, patterns, borders, alignment and
       number formatting.

   Creating and	using a	Format object
       Cell formatting is defined through a Format object. Format objects are
       created by calling the workbook "add_format()" method as	follows:

	   my $format1 = $workbook->add_format();	# Set properties later
	   my $format2 = $workbook->add_format(%props);	# Set at creation

       The format object holds all the formatting properties that can be
       applied to a cell, a row	or a column. The process of setting these
       properties is discussed in the next section.

       Once a Format object has	been constructed and it	properties have	been
       set it can be passed as an argument to the worksheet "write" methods as
       follows:

	   $worksheet->write(0,	0, 'One', $format);
	   $worksheet->write_string(1, 0, 'Two', $format);
	   $worksheet->write_number(2, 0, 3, $format);
	   $worksheet->write_blank(3, 0, $format);

       Formats can also	be passed to the worksheet "set_row()" and
       "set_column()" methods to define	the default property for a row or
       column.

	   $worksheet->set_row(0, 15, $format);
	   $worksheet->set_column(0, 0,	15, $format);

   Format methods and Format properties
       The following table shows the Excel format categories, the formatting
       properties that can be applied and the equivalent object	method:

	   Category   Description	Property	Method Name
	   --------   -----------	--------	-----------
	   Font	      Font type		font		set_font()
		      Font size		size		set_size()
		      Font color	color		set_color()
		      Bold		bold		set_bold()
		      Italic		italic		set_italic()
		      Underline		underline	set_underline()
		      Strikeout		font_strikeout	set_font_strikeout()
		      Super/Subscript	font_script	set_font_script()
		      Outline		font_outline	set_font_outline()
		      Shadow		font_shadow	set_font_shadow()

	   Number     Numeric format	num_format	set_num_format()

	   Protection Lock cells	locked		set_locked()
		      Hide formulas	hidden		set_hidden()

	   Alignment  Horizontal align	align		set_align()
		      Vertical align	valign		set_align()
		      Rotation		rotation	set_rotation()
		      Text wrap		text_wrap	set_text_wrap()
		      Justify last	text_justlast	set_text_justlast()
		      Center across	center_across	set_center_across()
		      Indentation	indent		set_indent()
		      Shrink to	fit	shrink		set_shrink()

	   Pattern    Cell pattern	pattern		set_pattern()
		      Background color	bg_color	set_bg_color()
		      Foreground color	fg_color	set_fg_color()

	   Border     Cell border	border		set_border()
		      Bottom border	bottom		set_bottom()
		      Top border	top		set_top()
		      Left border	left		set_left()
		      Right border	right		set_right()
		      Border color	border_color	set_border_color()
		      Bottom color	bottom_color	set_bottom_color()
		      Top color		top_color	set_top_color()
		      Left color	left_color	set_left_color()
		      Right color	right_color	set_right_color()

       There are two ways of setting Format properties:	by using the object
       method interface	or by setting the property directly. For example, a
       typical use of the method interface would be as follows:

	   my $format =	$workbook->add_format();
	   $format->set_bold();
	   $format->set_color('red');

       By comparison the properties can	be set directly	by passing a hash of
       properties to the Format	constructor:

	   my $format =	$workbook->add_format(bold => 1, color => 'red');

       or after	the Format has been constructed	by means of the
       "set_properties()" method as follows:

	   my $format =	$workbook->add_format();
	   $format->set_properties(bold	=> 1, color => 'red');

       You can also store the properties in one	or more	named hashes and pass
       them to the required method:

	   my %font    = (
			   font	 => 'Arial',
			   size	 => 12,
			   color => 'blue',
			   bold	 => 1,
			 );

	   my %shading = (
			   bg_color => 'green',
			   pattern  => 1,
			 );

	   my $format1 = $workbook->add_format(%font);		 # Font	only
	   my $format2 = $workbook->add_format(%font, %shading); # Font	and shading

       The provision of	two ways of setting properties might lead you to
       wonder which is the best	way. The method	mechanism may be better	is you
       prefer setting properties via method calls (which the author did	when
       they were code was first	written) otherwise passing properties to the
       constructor has proved to be a little more flexible and self
       documenting in practice.	An additional advantage	of working with
       property	hashes is that it allows you to	share formatting between
       workbook	objects	as shown in the	example	above.

       The Perl/Tk style of adding properties is also supported:

	   my %font    = (
			   -font  => 'Arial',
			   -size  => 12,
			   -color => 'blue',
			   -bold  => 1,
			 );

   Working with	formats
       The default format is Arial 10 with all other properties	off.

       Each unique format in Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML	must have a
       corresponding Format object. It isn't possible to use a Format with a
       write() method and then redefine	the Format for use at a	later stage.
       This is because a Format	is applied to a	cell not in its	current	state
       but in its final	state. Consider	the following example:

	   my $format =	$workbook->add_format();
	   $format->set_bold();
	   $format->set_color('red');
	   $worksheet->write('A1', 'Cell A1', $format);
	   $format->set_color('green');
	   $worksheet->write('B1', 'Cell B1', $format);

       Cell A1 is assigned the Format $format which is initially set to	the
       colour red. However, the	colour is subsequently set to green. When
       Excel displays Cell A1 it will display the final	state of the Format
       which in	this case will be the colour green.

       In general a method call	without	an argument will turn a	property on,
       for example:

	   my $format1 = $workbook->add_format();
	   $format1->set_bold();  # Turns bold on
	   $format1->set_bold(1); # Also turns bold on
	   $format1->set_bold(0); # Turns bold off

FORMAT METHODS
       The Format object methods are described in more detail in the following
       sections. In addition, there is a Perl program called "formats.pl" in
       the "examples" directory	of the WriteExcelXML distribution. This
       program creates an Excel	workbook called	"formats.xls" which contains
       examples	of almost all the format types.

       The following Format methods are	available:

	   set_font()
	   set_size()
	   set_color()
	   set_bold()
	   set_italic()
	   set_underline()
	   set_font_strikeout()
	   set_font_script()
	   set_font_outline()
	   set_font_shadow()
	   set_num_format()
	   set_locked()
	   set_hidden()
	   set_align()
	   set_align()
	   set_rotation()
	   set_text_wrap()
	   set_text_justlast()
	   set_center_across()
	   set_indent()
	   set_shrink()
	   set_pattern()
	   set_bg_color()
	   set_fg_color()
	   set_border()
	   set_bottom()
	   set_top()
	   set_left()
	   set_right()
	   set_border_color()
	   set_bottom_color()
	   set_top_color()
	   set_left_color()
	   set_right_color()

       The above methods can also be applied directly as properties. For
       example "$worksheet->set_bold()"	is equivalent to "set_properties(bold
       => 1)".

   set_properties(%properties)
       The properties of an existing Format object can be set by means of
       "set_properties()":

	   my $format =	$workbook->add_format();
	   $format->set_properties(bold	=> 1, color => 'red');

       You can also store the properties in one	or more	named hashes and pass
       them to the "set_properties()" method:

	   my %font    = (
			   font	 => 'Arial',
			   size	 => 12,
			   color => 'blue',
			   bold	 => 1,
			 );

	   my $format =	$workbook->set_properties(%font);

       This method can be used as an alternative to setting the	properties
       with "add_format()" or the specific format methods that are detailed in
       the following sections.

   set_font($fontname)
	   Default state:      Font is Arial
	   Default action:     None
	   Valid args:	       Any valid font name

       Specify the font	used:

	   $format->set_font('Times New	Roman');

       Excel can only display fonts that are installed on the system that it
       is running on. Therefore	it is best to use the fonts that come as
       standard	such as	'Arial', 'Times	New Roman' and 'Courier	New'. See also
       the Fonts worksheet created by formats.pl

   set_size()
	   Default state:      Font size is 10
	   Default action:     Set font	size to	1
	   Valid args:	       Integer values from 1 to	as big as your screen.

       Set the font size. Excel	adjusts	the height of a	row to accommodate the
       largest font size in the	row. You can also explicitly specify the
       height of a row using the set_row() worksheet method.

	   my $format =	$workbook->add_format();
	   $format->set_size(30);

   set_color()
	   Default state:      Excels default color, usually black
	   Default action:     Set the default color
	   Valid args:	       Integers	from 8..63 or the following strings:
			       'black'
			       'blue'
			       'brown'
			       'cyan'
			       'gray'
			       'green'
			       'lime'
			       'magenta'
			       'navy'
			       'orange'
			       'purple'
			       'red'
			       'silver'
			       'white'
			       'yellow'

       Set the font colour. The	"set_color()" method is	used as	follows:

	   my $format =	$workbook->add_format();
	   $format->set_color('red');
	   $worksheet->write(0,	0, 'wheelbarrow', $format);

       Note: The "set_color()" method is used to set the colour	of the font in
       a cell. To set the colour of a cell use the "set_bg_color()" and
       "set_pattern()" methods.

       For additional examples see the 'Named colors' and 'Standard colors'
       worksheets created by formats.pl	in the examples	directory.

       See also	"COLOURS IN EXCEL".

   set_bold()
	   Default state:      bold is off
	   Default action:     Turn bold on
	   Valid args:	       0, 1 [1]

       Set the bold property of	the font:

	   $format->set_bold();	 # Turn	bold on

       [1] Actually, values in the range 100..1000 are also valid. 400 is
       normal, 700 is bold and 1000 is very bold indeed. It is probably	best
       to set the value	to 1 and use normal bold.

   set_italic()
	   Default state:      Italic is off
	   Default action:     Turn italic on
	   Valid args:	       0, 1

       Set the italic property of the font:

	   $format->set_italic();  # Turn italic on

   set_underline()
	   Default state:      Underline is off
	   Default action:     Turn on single underline
	   Valid args:	       0  = No underline
			       1  = Single underline
			       2  = Double underline
			       33 = Single accounting underline
			       34 = Double accounting underline

       Set the underline property of the font.

	   $format->set_underline();   # Single	underline

   set_font_strikeout()
	   Default state:      Strikeout is off
	   Default action:     Turn strikeout on
	   Valid args:	       0, 1

       Set the strikeout property of the font.

   set_font_script()
	   Default state:      Super/Subscript is off
	   Default action:     Turn Superscript	on
	   Valid args:	       0  = Normal
			       1  = Superscript
			       2  = Subscript

       Set the superscript/subscript property of the font. This	format is
       currently not very useful.

   set_font_outline()
	   Default state:      Outline is off
	   Default action:     Turn outline on
	   Valid args:	       0, 1

       Macintosh only.

   set_font_shadow()
	   Default state:      Shadow is off
	   Default action:     Turn shadow on
	   Valid args:	       0, 1

       Macintosh only.

   set_num_format()
	   Default state:      General format
	   Default action:     Format index 1
	   Valid args:	       See the following table

       This method is used to define the numerical format of a number in
       Excel. It controls whether a number is displayed	as an integer, a
       floating	point number, a	date, a	currency value or some other user
       defined format.

       The numerical format of a cell can be specified by using	a format
       string or an index to one of Excel's built-in formats:

	   my $format1 = $workbook->add_format();
	   my $format2 = $workbook->add_format();
	   $format1->set_num_format('d mmm yyyy'); # Format string
	   $format2->set_num_format(0x0f);	   # Format index

	   $worksheet->write(0,	0, 36892.521, $format1);      #	1 Jan 2001
	   $worksheet->write(0,	0, 36892.521, $format2);      #	1-Jan-01

       Using format strings you	can define very	sophisticated formatting of
       numbers.

	   $format01->set_num_format('0.000');
	   $worksheet->write(0,	 0, 3.1415926, $format01);    #	3.142

	   $format02->set_num_format('#,##0');
	   $worksheet->write(1,	 0, 1234.56,   $format02);    #	1,235

	   $format03->set_num_format('#,##0.00');
	   $worksheet->write(2,	 0, 1234.56,   $format03);    #	1,234.56

	   $format04->set_num_format('$0.00');
	   $worksheet->write(3,	 0, 49.99,     $format04);    #	$49.99

	   # Note you can use other currency symbols such as the pound or yen as well.
	   # Other currencies may require the use of Unicode.

	   $format07->set_num_format('mm/dd/yy');
	   $worksheet->write(6,	 0, 36892.521, $format07);    #	01/01/01

	   $format08->set_num_format('mmm d yyyy');
	   $worksheet->write(7,	 0, 36892.521, $format08);    #	Jan 1 2001

	   $format09->set_num_format('d	mmmm yyyy');
	   $worksheet->write(8,	 0, 36892.521, $format09);    #	1 January 2001

	   $format10->set_num_format('dd/mm/yyyy hh:mm AM/PM');
	   $worksheet->write(9,	 0, 36892.521, $format10);    #	01/01/2001 12:30 AM

	   $format11->set_num_format('0	"dollar	and" .00 "cents"');
	   $worksheet->write(10, 0, 1.87,      $format11);    #	1 dollar and .87 cents

	   # Conditional formatting
	   $format12->set_num_format('[Green]General;[Red]-General;General');
	   $worksheet->write(11, 0, 123,       $format12);    #	> 0 Green
	   $worksheet->write(12, 0, -45,       $format12);    #	< 0 Red
	   $worksheet->write(13, 0, 0,	       $format12);    #	= 0 Default colour

	   # Zip code
	   $format13->set_num_format('00000');
	   $worksheet->write(14, 0, '01209',   $format13);

       The number system used for dates	is described in	"DATES IN EXCEL".

       The colour format should	have one of the	following values:

	   [Black] [Blue] [Cyan] [Green] [Magenta] [Red] [White] [Yellow]

       Alternatively you can specify the colour	based on a colour index	as
       follows:	"[Color	n]", where n is	a standard Excel colour	index -	7. See
       the 'Standard colors' worksheet created by formats.pl.

       For more	information refer to the documentation on formatting in	the
       "doc" directory of the Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML distro, the Excel on-
       line help or to the tutorial at:
       http://support.microsoft.com/support/Excel/Content/Formats/default.asp
       and
       http://support.microsoft.com/support/Excel/Content/Formats/codes.asp

       You should ensure that the format string	is valid in Excel prior	to
       using it	in WriteExcelXML.

       The following Excel XML number format designations can be used in
       formats:

	   'General'
	   'General Number'
	   'General Date'
	   'Long Date'
	   'Medium Date'
	   'Short Date'
	   'Long Time'
	   'Medium Time'
	   'Short Time'
	   'Currency'
	   'Euro Currency'
	   'Fixed'
	   'Standard'
	   'Percent'
	   'Scientific'
	   'Yes/No'
	   'True/False'
	   'On/Off'

       Excel's built-in	formats	are shown in the following table:

	   Index   Index   Format String
	   0	   0x00	   General
	   1	   0x01	   0
	   2	   0x02	   0.00
	   3	   0x03	   #,##0
	   4	   0x04	   #,##0.00
	   5	   0x05	   ($#,##0_);($#,##0)
	   6	   0x06	   ($#,##0_);[Red]($#,##0)
	   7	   0x07	   ($#,##0.00_);($#,##0.00)
	   8	   0x08	   ($#,##0.00_);[Red]($#,##0.00)
	   9	   0x09	   0%
	   10	   0x0a	   0.00%
	   11	   0x0b	   0.00E+00
	   12	   0x0c	   # ?/?
	   13	   0x0d	   # ??/??
	   14	   0x0e	   m/d/yy
	   15	   0x0f	   d-mmm-yy
	   16	   0x10	   d-mmm
	   17	   0x11	   mmm-yy
	   18	   0x12	   h:mm	AM/PM
	   19	   0x13	   h:mm:ss AM/PM
	   20	   0x14	   h:mm
	   21	   0x15	   h:mm:ss
	   22	   0x16	   m/d/yy h:mm
	   ..	   ....	   ...........
	   37	   0x25	   (#,##0_);(#,##0)
	   38	   0x26	   (#,##0_);[Red](#,##0)
	   39	   0x27	   (#,##0.00_);(#,##0.00)
	   40	   0x28	   (#,##0.00_);[Red](#,##0.00)
	   41	   0x29	   _(* #,##0_);_(* (#,##0);_(* "-"_);_(@_)
	   42	   0x2a	   _($*	#,##0_);_($* (#,##0);_($* "-"_);_(@_)
	   43	   0x2b	   _(* #,##0.00_);_(* (#,##0.00);_(* "-"??_);_(@_)
	   44	   0x2c	   _($*	#,##0.00_);_($*	(#,##0.00);_($*	"-"??_);_(@_)
	   45	   0x2d	   mm:ss
	   46	   0x2e	   [h]:mm:ss
	   47	   0x2f	   mm:ss.0
	   48	   0x30	   ##0.0E+0
	   49	   0x31	   @

       For examples of these formatting	codes see the 'Numerical formats'
       worksheet created by formats.pl.	See also the number_formats1.html and
       the number_formats2.html	documents in the "doc" directory of the
       distro.

       Note 1. Numeric formats 23 to 36	are not	documented by Microsoft	and
       may differ in international versions.

       Note 2. In Excel	5 the dollar sign appears as a dollar sign. In Excel
       97-2000 it appears as the defined local currency	symbol.

       Note 3. The red negative	numeric	formats	display	slightly differently
       in Excel	5 and Excel 97-2000.

   set_locked()
	   Default state:      Cell locking is on
	   Default action:     Turn locking on
	   Valid args:	       0, 1

       This property can be used to prevent modification of a cells contents.
       Following Excel's convention, cell locking is turned on by default.
       However,	it only	has an effect if the worksheet has been	protected, see
       the worksheet "protect()" method.

	   my $locked  = $workbook->add_format();
	   $locked->set_locked(1); # A non-op

	   my $unlocked	= $workbook->add_format();
	   $locked->set_locked(0);

	   # Enable worksheet protection
	   $worksheet->protect();

	   # This cell cannot be edited.
	   $worksheet->write('A1', '=1+2', $locked);

	   # This cell can be edited.
	   $worksheet->write('A2', '=1+2', $unlocked);

       Note: This offers weak protection even with a password, see the note in
       relation	to the "protect()" method.

   set_hidden()
	   Default state:      Formula hiding is off
	   Default action:     Turn hiding on
	   Valid args:	       0, 1

       This property is	used to	hide a formula while still displaying its
       result. This is generally used to hide complex calculations from	end
       users who are only interested in	the result. It only has	an effect if
       the worksheet has been protected, see the worksheet "protect()" method.

	   my $hidden =	$workbook->add_format();
	   $hidden->set_hidden();

	   # Enable worksheet protection
	   $worksheet->protect();

	   # The formula in this cell isn't visible
	   $worksheet->write('A1', '=1+2', $hidden);

       Note: This offers weak protection even with a password, see the note in
       relation	to the "protect()" method.

   set_align()
	   Default state:      Alignment is off
	   Default action:     Left alignment
	   Valid args:	       'left'		   Horizontal
			       'center'
			       'right'
			       'fill'
			       'justify'
			       'center_across'

			       'top'		   Vertical
			       'vcenter'
			       'bottom'
			       'vjustify'

       This method is used to set the horizontal and vertical text alignment
       within a	cell. Vertical and horizontal alignments can be	combined. The
       method is used as follows:

	   my $format =	$workbook->add_format();
	   $format->set_align('center');
	   $format->set_align('vcenter');
	   $worksheet->set_row(0, 30);
	   $worksheet->write(0,	0, 'X',	$format);

       Text can	be aligned across two or more adjacent cells using the
       "center_across" property. However, for genuine merged cells it is
       better to use the "merge_range()" worksheet method.

       The "vjustify" (vertical	justify) option	can be used to provide
       automatic text wrapping in a cell. The height of	the cell will be
       adjusted	to accommodate the wrapped text. To specify where the text
       wraps use the "set_text_wrap()" method.

       For further examples see	the 'Alignment'	worksheet created by
       formats.pl.

   set_center_across()
	   Default state:      Center across selection is off
	   Default action:     Turn center across on
	   Valid args:	       1

       Text can	be aligned across two or more adjacent cells using the
       "set_center_across()" method. This is an	alias for the
       "set_align('center_across')" method call.

       Only one	cell should contain the	text, the other	cells should be	blank:

	   my $format =	$workbook->add_format();
	   $format->set_center_across();

	   $worksheet->write(1,	1, 'Center across selection', $format);
	   $worksheet->write_blank(1, 2, $format);

       See also	the "merge1.pl"	to "merge5.pl" programs	in the "examples"
       directory and the "merge_range()" method.

   set_text_wrap()
	   Default state:      Text wrap is off
	   Default action:     Turn text wrap on
	   Valid args:	       0, 1

       Here is an example using	the text wrap property,	the escape character
       "\n" is used to indicate	the end	of line:

	   my $format =	$workbook->add_format();
	   $format->set_text_wrap();
	   $worksheet->write(0,	0, "It's\na bum\nwrap",	$format);

       Excel will adjust the height of the row to accommodate the wrapped
       text. A similar effect can be obtained without newlines using the
       "set_align('vjustify')" method. See the "textwrap.pl" program in	the
       "examples" directory.

   set_rotation()
	   Default state:      Text rotation is	off
	   Default action:     None
	   Valid args:	       Integers	in the range -90 to 90 and 270

       Set the rotation	of the text in a cell. The rotation can	be any angle
       in the range -90	to 90 degrees.

	   my $format =	$workbook->add_format();
	   $format->set_rotation(30);
	   $worksheet->write(0,	0, 'This text is rotated', $format);

       The angle 270 is	also supported.	This indicates text where the letters
       run from	top to bottom.

   set_indent()
	   Default state:      Text indentation	is off
	   Default action:     Indent text 1 level
	   Valid args:	       Positive	integers

       This method can be used to indent text. The argument, which should be
       an integer, is taken as the level of indentation:

	   my $format =	$workbook->add_format();
	   $format->set_indent(2);
	   $worksheet->write(0,	0, 'This text is indented', $format);

       Indentation is a	horizontal alignment property. It will override	any
       other horizontal	properties but it can be used in conjunction with
       vertical	properties.

   set_shrink()
	   Default state:      Text shrinking is off
	   Default action:     Turn "shrink to fit" on
	   Valid args:	       1

       This method can be used to shrink text so that it fits in a cell.

	   my $format =	$workbook->add_format();
	   $format->set_shrink();
	   $worksheet->write(0,	0, 'Honey, I shrunk the	text!',	$format);

   set_text_justlast()
	   Default state:      Justify last is off
	   Default action:     Turn justify last on
	   Valid args:	       0, 1

       Only applies to Far Eastern versions of Excel.

   set_pattern()
	   Default state:      Pattern is off
	   Default action:     Solid fill is on
	   Valid args:	       0 .. 18

       Set the background pattern of a cell.

       Examples	of the available patterns are shown in the 'Patterns'
       worksheet created by formats.pl.	However, it is unlikely	that you will
       ever need anything other	than Pattern 1 which is	a solid	fill of	the
       background color.

   set_bg_color()
	   Default state:      Color is	off
	   Default action:     Solid fill.
	   Valid args:	       See set_color()

       The "set_bg_color()" method can be used to set the background colour of
       a pattern. Patterns are defined via the "set_pattern()" method. If a
       pattern hasn't been defined then	a solid	fill pattern is	used as	the
       default.

       Here is an example of how to set	up a solid fill	in a cell:

	   my $format =	$workbook->add_format();

	   $format->set_pattern(); # This is optional when using a solid fill

	   $format->set_bg_color('green');
	   $worksheet->write('A1', 'Ray', $format);

       For further examples see	the 'Patterns' worksheet created by
       formats.pl.

   set_fg_color()
	   Default state:      Color is	off
	   Default action:     Solid fill.
	   Valid args:	       See set_color()

       The "set_fg_color()" method can be used to set the foreground colour of
       a pattern.

       For further examples see	the 'Patterns' worksheet created by
       formats.pl.

   set_border()
	   Also	applies	to:    set_bottom()
			       set_top()
			       set_left()
			       set_right()

	   Default state:      Border is off
	   Default action:     Set border type 1
	   Valid args:	       0 No border
			       1 Thin single border
			       2 Medium	single border
			       3 Dashed	border
			       4 Dotted	border
			       5 Thick single border
			       6 Double	line border
			       7 Hair border

       A cell border is	comprised of a border on the bottom, top, left and
       right. These can	be set to the same value using "set_border()" or
       individually using the relevant method calls shown above. Examples of
       the available border styles are shown in	the 'Borders' worksheet
       created by formats.pl.

   set_border_color()
	   Also	applies	to:    set_bottom_color()
			       set_top_color()
			       set_left_color()
			       set_right_color()

	   Default state:      Color is	off
	   Default action:     Undefined
	   Valid args:	       See set_color()

       Set the colour of the cell borders. A cell border is comprised of a
       border on the bottom, top, left and right. These	can be set to the same
       colour using "set_border_color()" or individually using the relevant
       method calls shown above. Examples of the border	styles and colours are
       shown in	the 'Borders' worksheet	created	by formats.pl.

   copy($format)
       This method is used to copy all of the properties from one Format
       object to another:

	   my $lorry1 =	$workbook->add_format();
	   $lorry1->set_bold();
	   $lorry1->set_italic();
	   $lorry1->set_color('red');	 # lorry1 is bold, italic and red

	   my $lorry2 =	$workbook->add_format();
	   $lorry2->copy($lorry1);
	   $lorry2->set_color('yellow'); # lorry2 is bold, italic and yellow

       The "copy()" method is only useful if you are using the method
       interface to Format properties. It generally isn't required if you are
       setting Format properties directly using	hashes.

       Note: this is not a copy	constructor, both objects must exist prior to
       copying.

COLOURS	IN EXCEL
       Note: This method is not	yet supported by Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML.
       See Spreadsheet::WriteExcel if you need this feature.

       Excel provides a	colour palette of 56 colours. In
       Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML these	colours	are accessed via their palette
       index in	the range 8..63. This index is used to set the colour of
       fonts, cell patterns and	cell borders. For example:

	   my $format =	$workbook->add_format(
					       color =>	12, # index for	blue
					       font  =>	'Arial',
					       size  =>	12,
					       bold  =>	1,
					    );

       The most	commonly used colours can also be accessed by name. The	name
       acts as a simple	alias for the colour index:

	   black     =>	   8
	   blue	     =>	  12
	   brown     =>	  16
	   cyan	     =>	  15
	   gray	     =>	  23
	   green     =>	  17
	   lime	     =>	  11
	   magenta   =>	  14
	   navy	     =>	  18
	   orange    =>	  53
	   purple    =>	  20
	   red	     =>	  10
	   silver    =>	  22
	   white     =>	   9
	   yellow    =>	  13

       For example:

	   my $font = $workbook->add_format(color => 'red');

       Users of	VBA in Excel should note that the equivalent colour indices
       are in the range	1..56 instead of 8..63.

       If the default palette does not provide a required colour you can
       override	one of the built-in values. This is achieved by	using the
       "set_custom_color()" workbook method to adjust the RGB (red green blue)
       components of the colour:

	   my $ferrari = $workbook->set_custom_color(40, 216, 12, 12);

	   my $format  = $workbook->add_format(
					       bg_color	=> $ferrari,
					       pattern	=> 1,
					       border	=> 1
					     );

	   $worksheet->write_blank('A1', $format);

       The default Excel colour	palette	is shown in "palette.html" in the
       "doc" directory of the distro. You can generate an Excel	version	of the
       palette using "colors.pl" in the	"examples" directory.

DATES IN EXCEL
       The following methods  will work	with Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML	but
       they apply more to Spreadsheet::WriteExcel since	Excel XML has another
       relatively simpler method of dealing with dates.	See the
       "write_date_time()" Worksheet method.

       Dates and times in Excel	are represented	by real	numbers, for example
       "Jan 1 2001 12:30 AM" is	represented by the number 36892.521.

       The integer part	of the number stores the number	of days	since the
       epoch and the fractional	part stores the	percentage of the day.

       The epoch can be	either 1900 or 1904. Excel for Windows uses 1900 and
       Excel for Macintosh uses	1904. The epochs are:

	   1900: 0 January 1900	i.e. 31	December 1899
	   1904: 1 January 1904

       By default Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML uses the Windows/1900 format
       although	it generally isn't an issue since Excel	on Windows and the
       Macintosh will convert automatically between one	system and the other.
       To use the 1904 epoch you must use the "set_1904()" workbook method.

       There are two things to note about the 1900 date	format.	The first is
       that the	epoch starts on	0 January 1900.	The second is that the year
       1900 is erroneously but deliberately treated as a leap year. Therefore
       you must	add an extra day to dates after	28 February 1900. The reason
       for this	anomaly	is explained at
       http://support.microsoft.com/support/kb/articles/Q181/3/70.asp

       A date or time in Excel is like any other number. To display the	number
       as a date you must apply	a number format	to it. Refer to	the
       "set_num_format()" method above:

	   $format->set_num_format('mmm	d yyyy hh:mm AM/PM');
	   $worksheet->write('A1', 36892.521 , $format); # Jan 1 2001 12:30 AM

       The "Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML::Utility" module	that is	included in
       the distro contains helper functions for	dealing	with dates and times
       in Excel, for example:

	   $date = xl_date_list(2002, 1, 1);	     # 37257
	   $date = xl_parse_date("11 July 1997");    # 35622
	   $time = xl_parse_time('3:21:36 PM');	     # 0.64
	   $date = xl_decode_date_EU("13 May 2002"); # 37389

       These functions deal automatically with the s1900 leap year issue
       described above.

       The date	and time functions are based on	functions provided by the
       "Date::Calc" and	"Date::Manip" modules. These modules are very useful
       if you plan to manipulate dates in different formats.

       See also	the DateTime::Format::Excel
       module,http://search.cpan.org/search?dist=DateTime-Format-Excel which
       is part of the DateTime project and which deals specifically with
       converting dates	and times to and from Excel's format.

       There is	also the "excel_date1.pl" program in the "examples" directory
       of the WriteExcelXML distribution which was written by Andrew Benham.
       It contains a detailed description of the problems involved in
       calculating dates in Excel. It does not require any external modules.

       It is also possible to get Excel	to calculate dates for you by defining
       a function:

	   $worksheet->write('A1', '=DATEVALUE("1-Jan-2001")');

       However,	this carries a performance overhead in
       Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML due to the parsing of	the formula and	it
       shouldn't be used for programs that deal	with a large number of dates,
       unless you use it in conjunction	with "store_formula()" and
       "repeat_formula()" .

OUTLINES AND GROUPING IN EXCEL
       Note: Outlines and Grouping is not supported by Excel XML. See
       Spreadsheet::WriteExcel if you need this	feature.

       Excel allows you	to group rows or columns so that they can be hidden or
       displayed with a	single mouse click. This feature is referred to	as
       outlines.

       Outlines	can reduce complex data	down to	a few salient sub-totals or
       summaries.

       This feature is best viewed in Excel but	the following is an ASCII
       representation of what a	worksheet with three outlines might look like.
       Rows 3-4	and rows 7-8 are grouped at level 2. Rows 2-9 are grouped at
       level 1.	The lines at the left hand side	are called outline level bars.

		   ------------------------------------------
	    1 2	3 |   |	  A   |	  B   |	  C   |	  D   |	 ...
		   ------------------------------------------
	     _	  | 1 |	  A   |	      |	      |	      |	 ...
	    |  _  | 2 |	  B   |	      |	      |	      |	 ...
	    | |	  | 3 |	 (C)  |	      |	      |	      |	 ...
	    | |	  | 4 |	 (D)  |	      |	      |	      |	 ...
	    | -	  | 5 |	  E   |	      |	      |	      |	 ...
	    |  _  | 6 |	  F   |	      |	      |	      |	 ...
	    | |	  | 7 |	 (G)  |	      |	      |	      |	 ...
	    | |	  | 8 |	 (H)  |	      |	      |	      |	 ...
	    | -	  | 9 |	  I   |	      |	      |	      |	 ...
	    -	  | . |	 ...  |	 ...  |	 ...  |	 ...  |	 ...

       Clicking	the minus sign on each of the level 2 outlines will collapse
       and hide	the data as shown in the next figure. The minus	sign changes
       to a plus sign to indicate that the data	in the outline is hidden.

		   ------------------------------------------
	    1 2	3 |   |	  A   |	  B   |	  C   |	  D   |	 ...
		   ------------------------------------------
	     _	  | 1 |	  A   |	      |	      |	      |	 ...
	    |	  | 2 |	  B   |	      |	      |	      |	 ...
	    | +	  | 5 |	  E   |	      |	      |	      |	 ...
	    |	  | 6 |	  F   |	      |	      |	      |	 ...
	    | +	  | 9 |	  I   |	      |	      |	      |	 ...
	    -	  | . |	 ...  |	 ...  |	 ...  |	 ...  |	 ...

       Clicking	on the minus sign on the level 1 outline will collapse the
       remaining rows as follows:

		   ------------------------------------------
	    1 2	3 |   |	  A   |	  B   |	  C   |	  D   |	 ...
		   ------------------------------------------
		  | 1 |	  A   |	      |	      |	      |	 ...
	    +	  | . |	 ...  |	 ...  |	 ...  |	 ...  |	 ...

       Grouping	in "Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML"	is achieved by setting the
       outline level via the "set_row()" and "set_column()" worksheet methods:

	   set_row($row, $height, $format, $hidden, $level)
	   set_column($first_col, $last_col, $width, $format, $hidden, $level)

       The following example sets an outline level of 1	for rows 1 and 2
       (zero-indexed) and columns B to G. The parameters $height and $XF are
       assigned	default	values since they are undefined:

	   $worksheet->set_row(1, undef, undef,	0, 1);
	   $worksheet->set_row(2, undef, undef,	0, 1);
	   $worksheet->set_column('B:G', undef,	undef, 0, 1);

       Excel allows up to 7 outline levels. Therefore the $level parameter
       should be in the	range "0 <= $level <= 7".

       Rows and	columns	can be collapsed by setting the	$hidden	flag:

	   $worksheet->set_row(1, undef, undef,	1, 1);
	   $worksheet->set_row(2, undef, undef,	1, 1);
	   $worksheet->set_column('B:G', undef,	undef, 1, 1);

       For a more complete example see the "outline.pl"	program	in the
       examples	directory of the distro.

       Some additional outline properties can be set via the
       "outline_settings()" worksheet method, see above.

FORMULAS AND FUNCTIONS IN EXCEL
   Caveats
       The first thing to note is that there are still some outstanding	issues
       with the	implementation of formulas and functions:

	   1. Named ranges are not supported.

       However,	this and other constraints will	be removed in future versions.
       They are	here because of	a trade-off between features and time.

   Introduction
       The following is	a brief	introduction to	formulas and functions in
       Excel and Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML.

       A formula is a string that begins with an equals	sign:

	   '=A1+B1'
	   '=AVERAGE(1,	2, 3)'

       The formula can contain numbers,	strings, boolean values, cell
       references, cell	ranges and functions. Named ranges are not supported.
       Formulas	should be written as they appear in Excel, that	is cells and
       functions must be in uppercase.

       Cells in	Excel are referenced using the A1 notation system where	the
       column is designated by a letter	and the	row by a number. Columns range
       from A to XFD i.e. 0 to 16384, rows range from 1	to 1048576. When the
       "use_lower_cell_limits()" method	is used	the columns range from A to
       IV, 0 to	255 and	 rows range from 1 to 65536.

	The C<Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML::Utility> module that is included in the distro contains helper functions for dealing with A1 notation, for example:

	   use Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML::Utility;

	   ($row, $col)	= xl_cell_to_rowcol('C2');  # (1, 2)
	   $str		= xl_rowcol_to_cell(1, 2);  # C2

       The Excel "$" notation in cell references is also supported. This
       allows you to specify whether a row or column is	relative or absolute.
       This only has an	effect if the cell is copied. The following examples
       show relative and absolute values.

	   '=A1'   # Column and	row are	relative
	   '=$A1'  # Column is absolute	and row	is relative
	   '=A$1'  # Column is relative	and row	is absolute
	   '=$A$1' # Column and	row are	absolute

       Formulas	can also refer to cells	in other worksheets of the current
       workbook. For example:

	   '=Sheet2!A1'
	   '=Sheet2!A1:A5'
	   '=Sheet2:Sheet3!A1'
	   '=Sheet2:Sheet3!A1:A5'
	   q{='Test Data'!A1}
	   q{='Test Data1:Test Data2'!A1}

       The sheet reference and the cell	reference are separated	by  "!"	the
       exclamation mark	symbol.	If worksheet names contain spaces, commas o
       parentheses then	Excel requires that the	name is	enclosed in single
       quotes as shown in the last two examples	above. In order	to avoid using
       a lot of	escape characters you can use the quote	operator "q{}" to
       protect the quotes. See "perlop"	in the main Perl documentation.	Only
       valid sheet names that have been	added using the	"add_worksheet()"
       method can be used in formulas. You cannot reference external
       workbooks.

       The following table lists the operators that are	available in Excel's
       formulas. The majority of the operators are the same as Perl's,
       differences are indicated:

	   Arithmetic operators:
	   =====================
	   Operator  Meaning		       Example
	      +	     Addition		       1+2
	      -	     Subtraction	       2-1
	      *	     Multiplication	       2*3
	      /	     Division		       1/4
	      ^	     Exponentiation	       2^3	# Equivalent to	**
	      -	     Unary minus	       -(1+2)
	      %	     Percent (Not modulus)     13%

	   Comparison operators:
	   =====================
	   Operator  Meaning		       Example
	       =     Equal to		       A1 =  B1	# Equivalent to	==
	       <>    Not equal to	       A1 <> B1	# Equivalent to	!=
	       >     Greater than	       A1 >  B1
	       <     Less than		       A1 <  B1
	       >=    Greater than or equal to  A1 >= B1
	       <=    Less than or equal	to     A1 <= B1

	   String operator:
	   ================
	   Operator  Meaning		       Example
	       &     Concatenation	       "Hello "	& "World!" # [1]

	   Reference operators:
	   ====================
	   Operator  Meaning		       Example
	       :     Range operator	       A1:A4		   # [2]
	       ,     Union operator	       SUM(1, 2+2, B3)	   # [3]

	   Notes:
	   [1]:	Equivalent to ("Hello "	. "World!") in Perl.
	   [2]:	This range is equivalent to cells A1, A2, A3 and A4.
	   [3]:	The comma behaves like the list	separator in Perl.

       The range and comma operators can have different	symbols	in non-English
       versions	of Excel. These	will be	supported in a later version of
       Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML. European users of Excel take	note:

	   $worksheet->write('A1', '=SUM(1; 2; 3)'); # Wrong!!
	   $worksheet->write('A1', '=SUM(1, 2, 3)'); # Okay

       The following table lists all of	the core functions supported by	Excel
       5 and Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML. Any additional	functions that are
       available through the "Analysis ToolPak"	or other add-ins are not
       supported. These	functions have all been	tested to verify that they
       work.

	   ABS		 DB	       INDIRECT	     NORMINV	   SLN
	   ACOS		 DCOUNT	       INFO	     NORMSDIST	   SLOPE
	   ACOSH	 DCOUNTA       INT	     NORMSINV	   SMALL
	   ADDRESS	 DDB	       INTERCEPT     NOT	   SQRT
	   AND		 DEGREES       IPMT	     NOW	   STANDARDIZE
	   AREAS	 DEVSQ	       IRR	     NPER	   STDEV
	   ASIN		 DGET	       ISBLANK	     NPV	   STDEVP
	   ASINH	 DMAX	       ISERR	     ODD	   STEYX
	   ATAN		 DMIN	       ISERROR	     OFFSET	   SUBSTITUTE
	   ATAN2	 DOLLAR	       ISLOGICAL     OR		   SUBTOTAL
	   ATANH	 DPRODUCT      ISNA	     PEARSON	   SUM
	   AVEDEV	 DSTDEV	       ISNONTEXT     PERCENTILE	   SUMIF
	   AVERAGE	 DSTDEVP       ISNUMBER	     PERCENTRANK   SUMPRODUCT
	   BETADIST	 DSUM	       ISREF	     PERMUT	   SUMSQ
	   BETAINV	 DVAR	       ISTEXT	     PI		   SUMX2MY2
	   BINOMDIST	 DVARP	       KURT	     PMT	   SUMX2PY2
	   CALL		 ERROR.TYPE    LARGE	     POISSON	   SUMXMY2
	   CEILING	 EVEN	       LEFT	     POWER	   SYD
	   CELL		 EXACT	       LEN	     PPMT	   T
	   CHAR		 EXP	       LINEST	     PROB	   TAN
	   CHIDIST	 EXPONDIST     LN	     PRODUCT	   TANH
	   CHIINV	 FACT	       LOG	     PROPER	   TDIST
	   CHITEST	 FALSE	       LOG10	     PV		   TEXT
	   CHOOSE	 FDIST	       LOGEST	     QUARTILE	   TIME
	   CLEAN	 FIND	       LOGINV	     RADIANS	   TIMEVALUE
	   CODE		 FINV	       LOGNORMDIST   RAND	   TINV
	   COLUMN	 FISHER	       LOOKUP	     RANK	   TODAY
	   COLUMNS	 FISHERINV     LOWER	     RATE	   TRANSPOSE
	   COMBIN	 FIXED	       MATCH	     REGISTER.ID   TREND
	   CONCATENATE	 FLOOR	       MAX	     REPLACE	   TRIM
	   CONFIDENCE	 FORECAST      MDETERM	     REPT	   TRIMMEAN
	   CORREL	 FREQUENCY     MEDIAN	     RIGHT	   TRUE
	   COS		 FTEST	       MID	     ROMAN	   TRUNC
	   COSH		 FV	       MIN	     ROUND	   TTEST
	   COUNT	 GAMMADIST     MINUTE	     ROUNDDOWN	   TYPE
	   COUNTA	 GAMMAINV      MINVERSE	     ROUNDUP	   UPPER
	   COUNTBLANK	 GAMMALN       MIRR	     ROW	   VALUE
	   COUNTIF	 GEOMEAN       MMULT	     ROWS	   VAR
	   COVAR	 GROWTH	       MOD	     RSQ	   VARP
	   CRITBINOM	 HARMEAN       MODE	     SEARCH	   VDB
	   DATE		 HLOOKUP       MONTH	     SECOND	   VLOOKUP
	   DATEVALUE	 HOUR	       N	     SIGN	   WEEKDAY
	   DAVERAGE	 HYPGEOMDIST   NA	     SIN	   WEIBULL
	   DAY		 IF	       NEGBINOMDIST  SINH	   YEAR
	   DAYS360	 INDEX	       NORMDIST	     SKEW	   ZTEST

       For a general introduction to Excel's formulas and an explanation of
       the syntax of the function refer	to the Excel help files	or the
       following links:
       http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/default.asp?URL=/library/officedev/office97/s88f2.htm
       and
       http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/default.asp?URL=/library/en-us/office97/s992f.htm

       If your formula doesn't work in Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML try the
       following:

	   1. Verify that the formula works in Excel (or Gnumeric or OpenOffice.org).
	   2. Ensure that it isn't on the Caveats list shown above.
	   3. Ensure that cell references and formula names are	in uppercase.
	   4. Ensure that you are using	':' as the range operator, A1:A4.
	   5. Ensure that you are using	',' as the union operator, SUM(1,2,3).

EXAMPLES
   Example 1
       The following example shows some	of the basic features of
       Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML.

	   #!/usr/bin/perl -w

	   use strict;
	   use Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML;

	   # Create a new workbook called simple.xls and add a worksheet
	   my $workbook	 = Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML->new("simple.xls");
	   my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet();

	   # The general syntax	is write($row, $column,	$token). Note that row and
	   # column are	zero indexed

	   # Write some	text
	   $worksheet->write(0,	0,  "Hi	Excel!");

	   # Write some	numbers
	   $worksheet->write(2,	0,  3);		 # Writes 3
	   $worksheet->write(3,	0,  3.00000);	 # Writes 3
	   $worksheet->write(4,	0,  3.00001);	 # Writes 3.00001
	   $worksheet->write(5,	0,  3.14159);	 # TeX revision	no.?

	   # Write some	formulas
	   $worksheet->write(7,	0,  '=A3 + A6');
	   $worksheet->write(8,	0,  '=IF(A5>3,"Yes", "No")');

	   # Write a hyperlink
	   $worksheet->write(10, 0, 'http://www.perl.com/');

   Example 2
       The following is	a general example which	demonstrates some features of
       working with multiple worksheets.

	   #!/usr/bin/perl -w

	   use strict;
	   use Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML;

	   # Create a new Excel	workbook
	   my $workbook	= Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML->new("regions.xls");

	   # Add some worksheets
	   my $north = $workbook->add_worksheet('North');
	   my $south = $workbook->add_worksheet('South');
	   my $east  = $workbook->add_worksheet('East');
	   my $west  = $workbook->add_worksheet('West');

	   # Add a Format
	   my $format =	$workbook->add_format();
	   $format->set_bold();
	   $format->set_color('blue');

	   # Add a caption to each worksheet
	   foreach my $worksheet ($workbook->sheets()) {
	       $worksheet->write(0, 0, 'Sales',	$format);
	   }

	   # Write some	data
	   $north->write(0, 1, 200000);
	   $south->write(0, 1, 100000);
	   $east->write	(0, 1, 150000);
	   $west->write	(0, 1, 100000);

	   # Set the active worksheet
	   $south->activate();

	   # Set the width of the first	column
	   $south->set_column(0, 0, 20);

	   # Set the active cell
	   $south->set_selection(0, 1);

   Example 3
       This example shows how to use a conditional numerical format with
       colours to indicate if a	share price has	gone up	or down.

	   use strict;
	   use Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML;

	   # Create a new workbook and add a worksheet
	   my $workbook	 = Spreadsheet::WriteExcel->new('stocks.xls');
	   my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet();

	   # Set the column width for columns 1, 2, 3 and 4
	   $worksheet->set_column(0, 3,	15);

	   # Create a format for the column headings
	   my $header =	$workbook->add_format();
	   $header->set_bold();
	   $header->set_size(12);
	   $header->set_color('blue');

	   # Create a format for the stock price
	   my $f_price = $workbook->add_format();
	   $f_price->set_align('left');
	   $f_price->set_num_format('$0.00');

	   # Create a format for the stock volume
	   my $f_volume	= $workbook->add_format();
	   $f_volume->set_align('left');
	   $f_volume->set_num_format('#,##0');

	   # Create a format for the price change. This	is an example of a
	   # conditional format. The number is formatted as a percentage. If it	is
	   # positive it is formatted in green,	if it is negative it is	formatted
	   # in	red and	if it is zero it is formatted as the default font colour
	   # (in this case black). Note: the [Green] format produces an	unappealing
	   # lime green. Try [Color 10]	instead	for a dark green.
	   #
	   my $f_change	= $workbook->add_format();
	   $f_change->set_align('left');
	   $f_change->set_num_format('[Green]0.0%;[Red]-0.0%;0.0%');

	   # Write out the data
	   $worksheet->write(0,	0, 'Company',$header);
	   $worksheet->write(0,	1, 'Price',  $header);
	   $worksheet->write(0,	2, 'Volume', $header);
	   $worksheet->write(0,	3, 'Change', $header);

	   $worksheet->write(1,	0, 'Damage Inc.'       );
	   $worksheet->write(1,	1, 30.25,    $f_price ); # $30.25
	   $worksheet->write(1,	2, 1234567,  $f_volume); # 1,234,567
	   $worksheet->write(1,	3, 0.085,    $f_change); # 8.5%	in green

	   $worksheet->write(2,	0, 'Dump Corp.'	       );
	   $worksheet->write(2,	1, 1.56,     $f_price ); # $1.56
	   $worksheet->write(2,	2, 7564,     $f_volume); # 7,564
	   $worksheet->write(2,	3, -0.015,   $f_change); # -1.5% in red

	   $worksheet->write(3,	0, 'Rev	Ltd.'	       );
	   $worksheet->write(3,	1, 0.13,     $f_price ); # $0.13
	   $worksheet->write(3,	2, 321,	     $f_volume); # 321
	   $worksheet->write(3,	3, 0,	     $f_change); # 0 in	the font color (black)

   Example 4
       The following is	a simple example of using functions.

	   #!/usr/bin/perl -w

	   use strict;
	   use Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML;

	   # Create a new workbook and add a worksheet
	   my $workbook	 = Spreadsheet::WriteExcel->new('stats.xls');
	   my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet('Test data');

	   # Set the column width for columns 1
	   $worksheet->set_column(0, 0,	20);

	   # Create a format for the headings
	   my $format =	$workbook->add_format();
	   $format->set_bold();

	   # Write the sample data
	   $worksheet->write(0,	0, 'Sample', $format);
	   $worksheet->write(0,	1, 1);
	   $worksheet->write(0,	2, 2);
	   $worksheet->write(0,	3, 3);
	   $worksheet->write(0,	4, 4);
	   $worksheet->write(0,	5, 5);
	   $worksheet->write(0,	6, 6);
	   $worksheet->write(0,	7, 7);
	   $worksheet->write(0,	8, 8);

	   $worksheet->write(1,	0, 'Length', $format);
	   $worksheet->write(1,	1, 25.4);
	   $worksheet->write(1,	2, 25.4);
	   $worksheet->write(1,	3, 24.8);
	   $worksheet->write(1,	4, 25.0);
	   $worksheet->write(1,	5, 25.3);
	   $worksheet->write(1,	6, 24.9);
	   $worksheet->write(1,	7, 25.2);
	   $worksheet->write(1,	8, 24.8);

	   # Write some	statistical functions
	   $worksheet->write(4,	 0, 'Count', $format);
	   $worksheet->write(4,	 1, '=COUNT(B1:I1)');

	   $worksheet->write(5,	 0, 'Sum', $format);
	   $worksheet->write(5,	 1, '=SUM(B2:I2)');

	   $worksheet->write(6,	 0, 'Average', $format);
	   $worksheet->write(6,	 1, '=AVERAGE(B2:I2)');

	   $worksheet->write(7,	 0, 'Min', $format);
	   $worksheet->write(7,	 1, '=MIN(B2:I2)');

	   $worksheet->write(8,	 0, 'Max', $format);
	   $worksheet->write(8,	 1, '=MAX(B2:I2)');

	   $worksheet->write(9,	 0, 'Standard Deviation', $format);
	   $worksheet->write(9,	 1, '=STDEV(B2:I2)');

	   $worksheet->write(10, 0, 'Kurtosis',	$format);
	   $worksheet->write(10, 1, '=KURT(B2:I2)');

   Example 5
       The following example converts a	tab separated file called "tab.txt"
       into an Excel file called "tab.xls".

	   #!/usr/bin/perl -w

	   use strict;
	   use Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML;

	   open	(TABFILE, 'tab.txt') or	die "tab.txt: $!";

	   my $workbook	 = Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML->new('tab.xls');
	   my $worksheet = $workbook->add_worksheet();

	   # Row and column are	zero indexed
	   my $row = 0;

	   while (<TABFILE>) {
	       chomp;
	       # Split on single tab
	       my @Fld = split('\t', $_);

	       my $col = 0;
	       foreach my $token (@Fld)	{
		   $worksheet->write($row, $col, $token);
		   $col++;
	       }
	       $row++;
	   }

       NOTE: This is a simple conversion program for illustrative purposes
       only. For converting a CSV or Tab separated or any other	type of
       delimited text file to Excel I recommend	the more rigorous csv2xls
       program that is part of H.Merijn	Brand's	Text::CSV_XS module distro.

       See the examples/csv2xls	link here:
       <http://search.cpan.org/~hmbrand/Text-CSV_XS/MANIFEST>.

   Additional Examples
       The following is	a description of the example files that	are provided
       with Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML,	in the "examples" directory of the
       distribution file. They are intended to demonstrate the different
       features	and options of the module.

	   Getting started
	   ===============
	   bug_report.pl	   A template for submitting bug reports.
	   demo.pl		   Creates a demo of some of the features.
	   formats.pl		   Creates a demo of the available formatting.
	   regions.pl		   Demonstrates	multiple worksheets.
	   simple.pl		   An example of some of the basic features.
	   stats.pl		   Basic formulas and functions.

	   Advanced
	   ========
	   autofilter.pl	   Examples of worksheet autofilters.
	   array_formula.pl	   Examples of how to write array formulas.
	   cgi.pl		   A simple CGI	program.
	   chess.pl		   An example of formatting using properties.
	   colors.pl		   Demo	of the colour palette and named	colours.
	   comments.pl		   Example of adding comments to cells.
	   copyformat.pl	   Example of copying a	cell format.
	   diag_border.pl	   A simple example of diagonal	cell borders.
	   filehandle.pl	   Examples of working with filehandles.
	   html_string		   Example of multiple cell formats via	html.
	   hyperlink1.pl	   Shows how to	create web hyperlinks.
	   hyperlink2.pl	   Examples of internal	and external hyperlinks.
	   indent.pl		   An example of cell indentation.
	   merge1.pl		   A simple example of cell merging.
	   merge2.pl		   A simple example of cell merging with formatting.
	   merge3.pl		   Add hyperlinks to merged cells.
	   merge4.pl		   An advanced example of merging with formatting.
	   merge5.pl		   An advanced example of merging with formatting.
	   mod_perl1.pl		   A simple mod_perl 1 program.
	   mod_perl2.pl		   A simple mod_perl 2 program.
	   protection.pl	   Example of cell locking and formula hiding.
	   sales.pl		   An example of a simple sales	spreadsheet.
	   sendmail.pl		   Send	an Excel email attachment using	Mail::Sender.
	   stats_ext.pl		   Same	as stats.pl with external references.
	   stocks.pl		   Demonstrates	conditional formatting.
	   textwrap.pl		   Demonstrates	text wrapping options.
	   web_component.pl	   Create an interactive Excel webpage with IE.
	   write_arrays.pl	   Example of writing 1D or 2D arrays of data.
	   write_to_scalar.pl	   Example of writing an Excel file to a Perl scalar.
	   write_handler1.pl	   Example of extending	the write() method. Step 1.
	   write_handler2.pl	   Example of extending	the write() method. Step 2.
	   write_handler3.pl	   Example of extending	the write() method. Step 3.
	   write_handler4.pl	   Example of extending	the write() method. Step 4.

	   Unicode
	   =======
	   unicode.pl		   Simple example of using Unicode UTF16 strings.
	   unicode_japan.pl	   Write Japanese Unicode strings using	UTF16.
	   unicode_list.pl	   List	the chars in a Unicode font.
	   unicode_2022_jp.pl	   Japanese: ISO-2022-JP to utf8 in perl 5.8.
	   unicode_8859_11.pl	   Thai:     ISO-8859_11 to utf8 in perl 5.8.
	   unicode_8859_7.pl	   Greek:    ISO-8859_7	 to utf8 in perl 5.8.
	   unicode_big5.pl	   Chinese:  BIG5	 to utf8 in perl 5.8.
	   unicode_cp1251.pl	   Russian:  CP1251	 to utf8 in perl 5.8.
	   unicode_cp1256.pl	   Arabic:   CP1256	 to utf8 in perl 5.8.
	   unicode_koi8r.pl	   Russian:  KOI8-R	 to utf8 in perl 5.8.
	   unicode_polish_utf8.pl  Polish :  UTF8	 to utf8 in perl 5.8.
	   unicode_shift_jis.pl	   Japanese: Shift JIS	 to utf8 in perl 5.8.

	   Utility
	   =======
	   csv2xls.pl		   Program to convert a	CSV file to an Excel file.
	   datecalc1.pl		   Convert Unix/Perl time to Excel time.
	   datecalc2.pl		   Calculate an	Excel date using Date::Calc.
	   tab2xls.pl		   Program to convert a	tab separated file to xls.

	   Developer
	   =========
	   convertA1.pl		   Helper functions for	dealing	with A1	notation.
	   writeA1.pl		   Example of how to extend the	module.

LIMITATIONS
       The following limits are	imposed	by Excel:

	   Description				Limit
	   -----------------------------------	------
	   Maximum number of chars in a	string	32767
	   Maximum number of columns		16384
	   Maximum number of rows		1048576
	   Maximum chars in a sheet name	31
	   Maximum chars in a header/footer	254

       When the	"use_lower_cell_limits()" method is used the columns and row
       limits are:

	   Maximum number of columns		256
	   Maximum number of rows		65536

DOWNLOADING
       The latest version of this module is always available at:
       <http://search.cpan.org/search?dist=Spreadsheet-WriteExcelXML/>.

REQUIREMENTS
       This module requires Perl 5.005 (or later).

INSTALLATION
       Use the standard	Unix style installation, a ppm for Windows users will
       be available in a later release:

	   Unzip and untar the module as follows or use	winzip:

	       tar -zxvf Spreadsheet-WriteExcel-0.xx.tar.gz

	   The module can be installed using the standard Perl procedure:

	       perl Makefile.PL
	       make
	       make test
	       make install    # You may need to be root
	       make clean      # or make realclean

PORTABILITY
       Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML should work on any platform that perl	runs
       on.

DIAGNOSTICS
       Filename	required by Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML->new()
	   A filename must be given in the constructor.

       Can't open filename. It may be in use or	protected.
	   The file cannot be opened for writing. The directory	that you are
	   writing to may be protected or the file may be in use by another
	   program.

THE EXCEL XML FORMAT
       The Excel XML format is described in the	SpreadsheetML specification
       and XML schemas that are	part of	the Microsoft Office Schemas. See:

       http://www.microsoft.com/downloads/details.aspx?FamilyId=FE118952-3547-420A-A412-00A2662442D9&displaylang=en

WRITING	EXCEL FILES
       Depending on your requirements, background and general sensibilities
       you may prefer one of the following methods of getting data into	Excel:

       o   Spreadsheet::WriteExcel

	   This	module allows creates an Excel in binary format. It uses the
	   same	interface as this module but currently has many	more features:
	   http://search.cpan.org/dist/Spreadsheet-WriteExcel

       o   Win32::OLE module and office	automation

	   This	requires a Windows platform and	an installed copy of Excel.
	   This	is the most powerful and complete method for interfacing with
	   Excel. See
	   <http://www.activestate.com/ASPN/Reference/Products/ActivePerl-5.6/faq/Windows/ActivePerl-Winfaq12.html>
	   and
	   <http://www.activestate.com/ASPN/Reference/Products/ActivePerl-5.6/site/lib/Win32/OLE.html>.
	   If your main	platform is UNIX but you have the resources to set up
	   a separate Win32/MSOffice server, you can convert office documents
	   to text, postscript or PDF using Win32::OLE.	For a demonstration of
	   how to do this using	Perl see Docserver:
	   <http://search.cpan.org/search?mode=module&query=docserver>.

       o   CSV,	comma separated	variables or text

	   If the file extension is "csv", Excel will open and convert this
	   format automatically. Generating a valid CSV	file isn't as easy as
	   it seems. Have a look at the	DBD::RAM, DBD::CSV, Text::xSV and
	   Text::CSV_XS	modules.

       o   DBI with DBD::ADO or	DBD::ODBC

	   Excel files contain an internal index table that allows them	to act
	   like	a database file. Using one of the standard Perl	database
	   modules you can connect to an Excel file as a database.

       o   DBD::Excel

	   You can also	access Spreadsheet::WriteExcel using the standard DBI
	   interface via Takanori Kawai's DBD::Excel module
	   <http://search.cpan.org/dist/DBD-Excel>

       o   Excel::Template

	   This	module allows you to create an Excel file from an XML template
	   in a	manner similar to HTML::Template. See
	   <http://search.cpan.org/dist/Excel-Template/>.

       o   Spreadsheet::WriteExcel::FromXML

	   This	module allows you to turn a simple XML file into an Excel file
	   using Spreadsheet::WriteExcel as a back-end.	The format of the XML
	   file	is defined by a	supplied DTD:
	   <http://search.cpan.org/dist/Spreadsheet-WriteExcel-FromXML>.

       o   Spreadsheet::WriteExcel::Simple

	   This	provides an easier interface to	Spreadsheet::WriteExcel:
	   <http://search.cpan.org/dist/Spreadsheet-WriteExcel-Simple>.

       o   Spreadsheet::WriteExcel::FromDB

	   This	is a useful module for creating	Excel files directly from a DB
	   table: <http://search.cpan.org/dist/Spreadsheet-WriteExcel-FromDB>.

       o   HTML	tables

	   This	is an easy way of adding formatting via	a text based format.

       o   XML or HTML

	   The Excel XML and HTML file specification are available from
	   <http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/officedev/ofxml2k/ofxml2k.htm>.

       For other Perl-Excel modules try	the following search:
       <http://search.cpan.org/search?mode=module&query=excel>.

READING	EXCEL FILES
       To read data from Excel files try:

       o   Spreadsheet::ParseExcel

	   This	uses the OLE::Storage-Lite module to extract data from an
	   Excel file. <http://search.cpan.org/dist/Spreadsheet-ParseExcel>.

       o   Spreadsheet::ParseExcel_XLHTML

	   This	module uses Spreadsheet::ParseExcel's interface	but uses
	   xlHtml (see below) to do the	conversion:
	   <http://search.cpan.org/dist/Spreadsheet-ParseExcel_XLHTML>
	   Spreadsheet::ParseExcel_XLHTML

       o   xlHtml

	   This	is an open source "Excel to HTML Converter" C/C++ project at
	   <http://chicago.sourceforge.net/xlhtml/>.

       o   DBD::Excel (reading)

	   You can also	access Spreadsheet::ParseExcel using the standard DBI
	   interface via  Takanori Kawai's DBD::Excel module
	   <http://search.cpan.org/dist/DBD-Excel>.

       o   Win32::OLE module and office	automation (reading)

	   See,	the section "WRITING EXCEL FILES".

       o   HTML	tables (reading)

	   If the files	are saved from Excel in	a HTML format the data can be
	   accessed using HTML::TableExtract
	   <http://search.cpan.org/dist/HTML-TableExtract>.

       o   DBI with DBD::ADO or	DBD::ODBC.

	   See,	the section "WRITING EXCEL FILES".

       o   XML::Excel

	   Converts Excel files	to XML using Spreadsheet::ParseExcel
	   <http://search.cpan.org/dist/XML-Excel>.

       o   OLE::Storage, aka LAOLA

	   This	is a Perl interface to OLE file	formats. In particular,	the
	   distro contains an Excel to HTML converter called Herbert,
	   <http://user.cs.tu-berlin.de/~schwartz/pmh/>. This has been
	   superseded by the Spreadsheet::ParseExcel module.

       For other Perl-Excel modules try	the following search:
       <http://search.cpan.org/search?mode=module&query=excel>.

       If you wish to view Excel files on a UNIX/Linux platform	check out the
       excellent Gnumeric spreadsheet application at
       <http://www.gnome.org/projects/gnumeric/> or OpenOffice.org at
       <http://www.openoffice.org/>.

       If you wish to view Excel files on a Windows platform which doesn't
       have Excel installed you	can use	the free Microsoft Excel Viewer
       <http://office.microsoft.com/downloads/2000/xlviewer.aspx>.

BUGS
       Formulas	are formulae.

       If you wish to submit a bug report run the "bug_report.pl" program in
       the "examples" directory	of the distro.

TO DO
       The roadmap is as follows:

       o   Catch up with Spreadsheet-WriteExcel.

       o   Add some other autofilter options.

       Also, here are some requested features that cannot be added because
       they aren't included in Excel XML specification:

       o   Graphs.

       o   Macros.

REPOSITORY
       The Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML source code in host on github:
       <http://github.com/jmcnamara/spreadsheet-writeexcelxml>.

MAILING	LIST
       There is	a Google group for discussing and asking questions about
       Spreadsheet::WriteExcel.	This is	a good place to	search to see if your
       question	has been asked before:
       <http://groups.google.com/group/spreadsheet-writeexcel>.

DONATIONS
       If you'd	care to	donate to the Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML project, you
       can do so via PayPal: <http://tinyurl.com/7ayes>.

SEE ALSO
       Spreadsheet::WriteExcel:
       <http://search.cpan.org/search?dist=Spreadsheet-WriteExcel>.

       Spreadsheet::ParseExcel:
       <http://search.cpan.org/search?dist=Spreadsheet-ParseExcel>.

AUTHOR
       John McNamara jmcnamara@cpan.org

	   Should poets	bicycle-pump the human heart
	       Or squash it flat?
	   Man's love is of man's life a thing apart;
	       Girls aren't like that.

	   We men have got love	well weighed up; our stuff
	       Can get by without it.
	   Women don't seem to think that's good enough;
	       They write about	it,

	       -- Kingsley Amis

PATENT LICENSE
       Software	programs that read or write files that comply with the
       Microsoft specifications	for the	Office Schemas must include the
       following notice:

       "This product may incorporate intellectual property owned by Microsoft
       Corporation. The	terms and conditions upon which	Microsoft is licensing
       such intellectual property may be found at
       http://msdn.microsoft.com/library/en-us/odcXMLRef/html/odcXMLRefLegalNotice.asp."

COPYRIGHT
       A(C) MM-MMXI, John McNamara.

       All Rights Reserved. This module	is free	software. It may be used,
       redistributed and/or modified under the same terms as Perl itself.

POD ERRORS
       Hey! The	above document had some	coding errors, which are explained
       below:

       Around line 3911:
	   Non-ASCII character seen before =encoding in	'A(C)'.	Assuming
	   CP1252

perl v5.24.1			  2012-12-07	 Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML(3)

NAME | VERSION | SYNOPSIS | DEPRECATION NOTICE | DESCRIPTION | Spreadsheet::WriteExcelXML and Spreadsheet::WriteExcel | QUICK START | WORKBOOK METHODS | WORKSHEET METHODS | PAGE SET-UP METHODS | CELL FORMATTING | FORMAT METHODS | COLOURS IN EXCEL | DATES IN EXCEL | OUTLINES AND GROUPING IN EXCEL | FORMULAS AND FUNCTIONS IN EXCEL | EXAMPLES | LIMITATIONS | DOWNLOADING | REQUIREMENTS | INSTALLATION | PORTABILITY | DIAGNOSTICS | THE EXCEL XML FORMAT | WRITING EXCEL FILES | READING EXCEL FILES | BUGS | TO DO | REPOSITORY | MAILING LIST | DONATIONS | SEE ALSO | AUTHOR | PATENT LICENSE | COPYRIGHT | POD ERRORS

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