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POE::Component::ServerUserAContributed Perl DocPOE::Component::Server::SOAP(3)

NAME
       POE::Component::Server::SOAP - publish POE event	handlers via SOAP over
       HTTP

SYNOPSIS
	       use POE;
	       use POE::Component::Server::SOAP;

	       POE::Component::Server::SOAP->new(
		       'ALIAS'	       =>      'MySOAP',
		       'ADDRESS'       =>      'localhost',
		       'PORT'	       =>      32080,
		       'HOSTNAME'      =>      'MyHost.com',
	       );

	       POE::Session->create(
		       'inline_states' =>      {
			       '_start'	       =>      \&setup_service,
			       '_stop'	       =>      \&shutdown_service,
			       'Sum_Things'    =>      \&do_sum,
		       },
	       );

	       $poe_kernel->run;
	       exit 0;

	       sub setup_service {
		       my $kernel = $_[KERNEL];
		       $kernel->alias_set( 'MyServer' );
		       $kernel->post( 'MySOAP',	'ADDMETHOD', 'MyServer', 'Sum_Things' );
	       }

	       sub shutdown_service {
		       $_[KERNEL]->post( 'MySOAP', 'DELMETHOD',	'MyServer', 'Sum_Things' );
	       }

	       sub do_sum {
		       my $response = $_[ARG0];
		       my $params = $response->soapbody;
		       my $sum = 0;
		       while (my ($field, $value) = each(%$params)) {
			       $sum += $value;
		       }

		       # Fake an error
		       if ( $sum < 100 ) {
			       $_[KERNEL]->post( 'MySOAP', 'FAULT', $response, 'Client.Add.Error', 'The	sum must be above 100' );
		       } else {
			       # Add the content
			       $response->content( "Thanks.  Sum is: $sum" );
			       $_[KERNEL]->post( 'MySOAP', 'DONE', $response );
		       }
	       }

ABSTRACT
	       An easy to use SOAP/1.1 daemon for POE-enabled programs

DESCRIPTION
       This module makes serving SOAP/1.1 requests a breeze in POE.

       The hardest thing to understand in this module is the SOAP Body.	That's
       it!

       The standard way	to use this module is to do this:

	       use POE;
	       use POE::Component::Server::SOAP;

	       POE::Component::Server::SOAP->new( ... );

	       POE::Session->create( ... );

	       POE::Kernel->run();

       POE::Component::Server::SOAP is a bolt-on component that	can publish
       event handlers via SOAP over HTTP.  Currently, this module only
       supports	SOAP/1.1 requests, work	will be	done in	the future to support
       SOAP/1.2	requests.  The HTTP server is done via
       POE::Component::Server::SimpleHTTP.

   Starting Server::SOAP
       To start	Server::SOAP, just call	it's new method:

	       POE::Component::Server::SOAP->new(
		       'ALIAS'	       =>      'MySOAP',
		       'ADDRESS'       =>      '192.168.1.1',
		       'PORT'	       =>      11111,
		       'HOSTNAME'      =>      'MySite.com',
		       'HEADERS'       =>      {},
	       );

       This method will	die on error or	return success.

       This constructor	accepts	only 7 options.

       "ALIAS"
	   This	will set the alias Server::SOAP	uses in	the POE	Kernel.	 This
	   will	default	to "SOAPServer"

       "ADDRESS"
	   This	value will be passed to	POE::Component::Server::SimpleHTTP to
	   bind	to.

	   Examples:	  ADDRESS => 0		   # Bind to all addresses +
	   localhost	  ADDRESS => 'localhost'	# Bind to localhost
		ADDRESS	=> '192.168.1.1'  # Bind to specified IP

       "PORT"
	   This	value will be passed to	POE::Component::Server::SimpleHTTP to
	   bind	to.

       "HOSTNAME"
	   This	value is for the HTTP::Request's URI to	point to.  If this is
	   not supplied, POE::Component::Server::SimpleHTTP will use
	   Sys::Hostname to find it.

       "HEADERS"
	   This	should be a hashref, that will become the default headers on
	   all HTTP::Response objects.	You can	override this in individual
	   requests by setting it via $response->header( ... )

	   The default header is:      Server =>
	   'POE::Component::Server::SOAP/' . $VERSION

	   For more information, consult the HTTP::Headers module.

       "MUSTUNDERSTAND"
	   This	is a boolean value, controlling	whether	Server::SOAP will
	   check for this value	in the Headers and Fault if it is present.
	   This	will default to	true.

       "SIMPLEHTTP"
	   This	allows you to pass options to the SimpleHTTP backend. One of
	   the real reasons is to support SSL in Server::SOAP, yay!  To	learn
	   how to use SSL, please consult the
	   POE::Component::Server::SimpleHTTP documentation. Of	course,	you
	   could totally screw up things, just use this	with caution :)

	   You must pass a hash	reference as the value,	because	it will	be
	   expanded and	put in the Server::SimpleHTTP->new() constructor.

   Events
       There are only a	few ways to communicate	with Server::SOAP.

       "ADDMETHOD"
		   This	event accepts four arguments:
			   - The intended session alias
			   - The intended session event
			   - The public	service	name	   ( not required -> defaults to session alias )
			   - The public	method name	   ( not required -> defaults to session event )

		   Calling this	event will add the method to the registry.

		   NOTE: This will overwrite the old definition	of a method if it exists!

       "DELMETHOD"
		   This	event accepts two arguments:
			   - The service name
			   - The method	name

		   Calling this	event will remove the method from the registry.

		   NOTE: if the	service	now contains no	methods, it will also be removed.

       "DELSERVICE"
		   This	event accepts one argument:
			   - The service name

		   Calling this	event will remove the entire service from the registry.

       "DONE"
		   This	event accepts only one argument: the SOAP::Response object we sent to the handler.

		   Calling this	event implies that this	particular request is done, and	will proceed to	close the socket.

		   The content in $response->content() will be automatically serialized	via SOAP::Lite's SOAP::Serializer

		   NOTE: This method automatically sets	some parameters:
			   - HTTP Status = 200 ( if not	defined	)
			   - HTTP Header value of 'Content-Type' = 'text/xml'

		   To get greater throughput and response time,	do not post() to the DONE event, call()	it!
		   However, this will force your program to block while	servicing SOAP requests...

       "RAWDONE"
		   This	event accepts only one argument: the SOAP::Response object we sent to the handler.

		   Calling this	event implies that this	particular request is done, and	will proceed to	close the socket.

		   The only difference between this and	the DONE event is that the content in $response->content() will	not
		   be serialized and passed through intact to the SOAP envelope. This is useful	if you generate	the xml	yourself.

		   NOTE:
			   - The xml content does not need to have a <?xml version="1.0" encoding="UTF-8"> header
			   - In	SOAP::Lite, the	client sees '<foo>54</foo><bar>89</bar>' as '54' only!
				   The solution	is to enclose the xml in another name, i.e. '<data><foo>54</foo><bar>89</bar></data>'
			   - If	the xml	is malformed or	is not escaped properly, the client will get terribly confused!

		   It will be inserted here:
			   ...<soap:Body><namesp4:TestResponse xmlns:namesp4="http://localhost:32080/">YOURSTUFFHERE</namesp4:TestResponse></soap:Body>...

       "FAULT"
		   This	event accepts five arguments:
			   - the HTTP::Response	object we sent to the handler
			   - SOAP Fault	Code	   ( not required -> defaults to 'Server' )
			   - SOAP Fault	String	   ( not required -> defaults to 'Application Faulted' )
			   - SOAP Fault	Detail	   ( not required )
			   - SOAP Fault	Actor	   ( not required )

		   Again, calling this event implies that this particular request is done, and will proceed to close the socket.

		   Calling this	event will generate a SOAP Fault and return it to the client.

		   NOTE: This method automatically sets	some parameters:
			   - HTTP Status = 500 ( if not	defined	)
			   - HTTP Header value of 'Content-Type' = 'text/xml'
			   - HTTP Content = SOAP Envelope of the fault ( overwriting anything that was there )

       "RAWFAULT"
		   This	event accepts only one argument: the SOAP::Response object we sent to the handler.

		   Calling this	event implies that this	particular request is done, and	will proceed to	close the socket.

		   The only difference between this and	the FAULT event	is that	you are	given freedom to create	your own xml for the
		   fault. It will be passed through intact to the SOAP envelope. Be sure to read the SOAP specs	:)

		   This	is very	similar	to the RAWDONE event, so go read the notes up there!

		   It will be inserted here:
			   ...<soap:Body>YOURSTUFFHERE</soap:Body>...

       "CLOSE"
		   This	event accepts only one argument: the SOAP::Response object we sent to the handler.

		   Calling this	event will proceed to close the	socket,	not sending any	output.

       "STARTLISTEN"
		   Starts the listening	socket,	if it was shut down

       "STOPLISTEN"
		   Simply a wrapper for	SHUTDOWN GRACEFUL, but will not	shutdown Server::SOAP if there is no more requests

       "SHUTDOWN"
		   Without arguments, Server::SOAP does	this:
			   Close the listening socket
			   Kills all pending requests by closing their sockets
			   Removes it's	alias

		   With	an argument of 'GRACEFUL', Server::SOAP	does this:
			   Close the listening socket
			   Waits for all pending requests to come in via DONE/FAULT/CLOSE, then	removes	it's alias

   Processing Requests
       if you're new to	the world of SOAP, reading the documentation by	the
       excellent author	of SOAP::Lite is recommended!  It also would help to
       read some stuff at http://www.soapware.org/ -> they have	some excellent
       links :)

       Now, once you have set up the services/methods, what do you expect from
       Server::SOAP?  Every request is pretty straightforward, you just	get a
       Server::SOAP::Response object in	ARG0.

	       The Server::SOAP::Response object contains a wealth of information about	the specified request:
		       - There is the SimpleHTTP::Connection object, which gives you connection	information
		       - There is the various SOAP accessors provided via Server::SOAP::Response
		       - There is the HTTP::Request object

	       Example information you can get:
		       $response->connection->remote_ip()      # IP of the client
		       $response->soaprequest->uri()	       # Original URI
		       $response->soapmethod()		       # The SOAP method that was called
		       $response->soapbody()		       # The arguments to the method

       Probably	the most important part	of SOAP::Response is the body of the
       message,	which contains the arguments to	the method call.  The data in
       the body	is a hash, for more information	look at	SOAP::Lite ->
       SOAP::Deserializer.

       I cannot	guarantee what will be in the body, it is all up to the	SOAP
       serializer/deserializer.	I can provide some examples:

	       NOTE: It	is much	easier to play around with parameters if they are properly encoded.
	       If you are using	SOAP::Lite, make extensive use of SOAP::Data->name() to	create parameters :)

	       Calling a SOAP method with no arguments:
		       print SOAP::Lite
			       -> uri('http://localhost:32080/')
			       -> proxy('http://localhost:32080/?session=MyServer')
			       -> Sum_Things()
			       -> result

	       The body	will look like this:
		       $VAR1 = undef;

	       Calling a SOAP method with multiple arguments:
		       print SOAP::Lite
			       -> uri('http://localhost:32080/')
			       -> proxy('http://localhost:32080/?session=MyServer')
			       -> Sum_Things( 8, 6, 7, 5, 3, 0,	9, 183 )
			       -> result

	       The body	will look like this:
		       $VAR1 = {
			       'c-gensym17' => '183',
			       'c-gensym5' => '6',
			       'c-gensym13' => '0',
			       'c-gensym11' => '3',
			       'c-gensym15' => '9',
			       'c-gensym9' => '5',
			       'c-gensym3' => '8',
			       'c-gensym7' => '7'
		       };

		       NOTE: The original array	ordering can be	received by sorting on the keys.

	       Calling a SOAP method with an arrayref
		       print SOAP::Lite
			       -> uri('http://localhost:32080/')
			       -> proxy('http://localhost:32080/?session=MyServer')
			       -> Sum_Things(
				       [ 8, 6, 7, 5, 3,	0, 9, 183 ]
				       )
			       -> result

	       The body	will look like this:
		       $VAR1 = {
			       'Array' => [
				       '8',
				       '6',
				       '7',
				       '5',
				       '3',
				       '0',
				       '9',
				       '183'
			       ]
		       };

	       Calling a SOAP method with a hash:
		       print SOAP::Lite
			       -> uri('http://localhost:32080/')
			       -> proxy('http://localhost:32080/?session=MyServer')
			       -> Sum_Things(  {
				       'FOO'   =>      'bax',
				       'Hello' =>      'World!',
			       }       )
			       -> result

	       The body	will look like this:
		       $VAR1 = {
			       'c-gensym21' => {
				       'Hello' => 'World!',
				       'FOO' =>	'bax',
			       }
		       };

	       Calling a SOAP method using SOAP::Data methods:
		       print SOAP::Lite
			       -> uri('http://localhost:32080/')
			       -> proxy('http://localhost:32080/?session=MyServer')
			       -> Sum_Things(
				       SOAP::Data->name( 'Foo',	'harz' ),
				       SOAP::Data->name( 'Param', 'value' ),
			       )-> result

	       The body	will look like this:
		       $VAR1 = {
			       'Param' => 'value',
			       'Foo' =>	'harz'
		       };

       Simply experiment using Data::Dumper and	you'll quickly get the hang of
       it!

       When you're done	with the SOAP request, stuff whatever output you have
       into the	content	of the response	object.

	       $response->content( 'The	result is ... '	);

       The only	thing left to do is send it off	to the DONE event :)

	       $_[KERNEL]->post( 'MySOAP', 'DONE', $response );

       If there's an error, you	can send it to the FAULT event,	which will
       convert it into a SOAP fault.

	       # See this website for more details about what "SOAP Fault" is :)
	       # http://www.w3.org/TR/2000/NOTE-SOAP-20000508/#_Toc478383507

	       $_[KERNEL]->post( 'MySOAP', 'FAULT', $response, 'Client.Authentication',	'Invalid password' );

   Server::SOAP	Notes
       This module is very picky about capitalization!

       All of the options are uppercase, to avoid confusion.

       You can enable debugging	mode by	doing this:

	       sub POE::Component::Server::SOAP::DEBUG () { 1 }
	       use POE::Component::Server::SOAP;

       In the case you want to see the raw xml being received/sent to the
       client, set DEBUG to 2.

       Yes, I broke a lot of things in the release ( 1.01 ), but Rocco agreed
       that it's best to break things as early as possible, so that
       development can move on instead of being	stuck on legacy	issues.

   Using SSL
       So you want to use SSL in Server::SOAP? Here's a	example	on how to do
       it:

	       POE::Component::Server::SOAP->new(
		       ...
		       'SIMPLEHTTP'    =>      {
			       'SSLKEYCERT'    =>      [ 'public-key.pem', 'public-cert.pem' ],
		       },
	       );

	       # And that's it provided	you've already created the necessary key + certificate file :)

       Ah, to use SSL in SOAP::Lite, simply use	https://blah.com instead of
       http://blah.com

SUPPORT
       You can find documentation for this module with the perldoc command.

	   perldoc POE::Component::Server::SOAP

   Websites
       o   AnnoCPAN: Annotated CPAN documentation

	   <http://annocpan.org/dist/POE-Component-Server-SOAP>

       o   CPAN	Ratings

	   <http://cpanratings.perl.org/d/POE-Component-Server-SOAP>

       o   RT: CPAN's request tracker

	   <http://rt.cpan.org/NoAuth/Bugs.html?Dist=POE-Component-Server-SOAP>

       o   Search CPAN

	   <http://search.cpan.org/dist/POE-Component-Server-SOAP>

   Bugs
       Please report any bugs or feature requests to
       "bug-poe-component-server-soap at rt.cpan.org", or through the web
       interface at
       <http://rt.cpan.org/NoAuth/ReportBug.html?Queue=POE-Component-Server-SOAP>.
       I will be notified, and then you'll automatically be notified of
       progress	on your	bug as I make changes.

SEE ALSO
       The examples directory that came	with this component.

       POE

       HTTP::Response

       HTTP::Request

       POE::Component::Server::SOAP::Response

       POE::Component::Server::SimpleHTTP

       SOAP::Lite

       POE::Component::SSLify

AUTHOR
       Apocalypse <apocal@cpan.org>

       I took over this	module from Rocco Caputo. Here is his stuff:

	       POE::Component::Server::SOAP is Copyright 2002 by Rocco Caputo.	All
	       rights are reserved.  POE::Component::Server::SOAP is free software;
	       you may redistribute it and/or modify it	under the same terms as	Perl
	       itself.

	       Rocco may be contacted by e-mail	via rcaputo@cpan.org.

COPYRIGHT AND LICENSE
       Copyright 2009 by Apocalypse

       This library is free software; you can redistribute it and/or modify it
       under the same terms as Perl itself.

perl v5.24.1			  2009-02-02   POE::Component::Server::SOAP(3)

NAME | SYNOPSIS | ABSTRACT | DESCRIPTION | SUPPORT | SEE ALSO | AUTHOR | COPYRIGHT AND LICENSE

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