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IRC::Utils(3)	      User Contributed Perl Documentation	 IRC::Utils(3)

NAME
       IRC::Utils - Common utilities for IRC-related tasks

SYNOPSIS
	use strict;
	use warnings;

	use IRC::Utils ':ALL';

	my $nickname = '^Lame|BOT[moo]';
	my $uppercase_nick = uc_irc($nickname);
	my $lowercase_nick = lc_irc($nickname);

	print "They're equivalent\n" if	eq_irc($uppercase_nick,	$lowercase_nick);

	my $mode_line =	'ov+b-i	Bob sue	stalin*!*@*';
	my $hashref = parse_mode_line($mode_line);

	my $banmask = 'stalin*';
	my $full_banmask = normalize_mask($banmask);

	if (matches_mask($full_banmask,	'stalin!joe@kremlin.ru')) {
	    print "EEK!";
	}

	my $decoded = irc_decode($raw_irc_message);
	print $decoded,	"\n";

	if (has_color($message)) {
	   print 'COLOR	CODE ALERT!\n";
	}

	my $results_hashref = matches_mask_array(\@masks, \@items_to_match_against);

	my $nick = parse_user('stalin!joe@kremlin.ru');
	my ($nick, $user, $host) = parse_user('stalin!joe@kremlin.ru');

DESCRIPTION
       The functions in	this module take care of many of the tasks you are
       faced with when working with IRC. Mode lines, ban masks,	message
       encoding	and formatting,	etc.

FUNCTIONS
   "uc_irc"
       Takes one mandatory parameter, a	string to convert to IRC uppercase,
       and one optional	parameter, the casemapping of the ircd (which can be
       'rfc1459', 'strict-rfc1459' or 'ascii'. Default is 'rfc1459'). Returns
       the IRC uppercase equivalent of the passed string.

   "lc_irc"
       Takes one mandatory parameter, a	string to convert to IRC lowercase,
       and one optional	parameter, the casemapping of the ircd (which can be
       'rfc1459', 'strict-rfc1459' or 'ascii'. Default is 'rfc1459'). Returns
       the IRC lowercase equivalent of the passed string.

   "eq_irc"
       Takes two mandatory parameters, IRC strings (channels or	nicknames) to
       compare.	A third, optional parameter specifies the casemapping. Returns
       true if the two strings are equivalent, false otherwise

	# long version
	lc_irc($one, $map) eq lc_irc($two, $map)

	# short	version
	eq_irc($one, $two, $map)

   "parse_mode_line"
       Takes a list representing an IRC	mode line. Returns a hashref.
       Optionally you can also supply an arrayref and a	hashref	to specify
       valid channel modes (default: "[qw(beI k	l imnpstaqr)]")	and status
       modes (default: "{o => '@', h =>	'%', v => '+'}"), respectively.

       If the modeline couldn't	be parsed the hashref will be empty. On
       success the following keys will be available in the hashref:

       'modes',	an arrayref of normalised modes;

       'args', an arrayref of applicable arguments to the modes;

       Example:

	my $hashref = parse_mode_line( 'ov+b-i', 'Bob',	'sue', 'stalin*!*@*' );

	# $hashref will	be:
	{
	   modes => [ '+o', '+v', '+b',	'-i' ],
	   args	 => [ 'Bob', 'sue', 'stalin*!*@*' ],
	}

   "normalize_mask"
       Takes one parameter, a string representing an IRC mask. Returns a
       normalised full mask.

       Example:

	$fullbanmask = normalize_mask( 'stalin*' );

	# $fullbanmask will be:	'stalin*!*@*';

   "matches_mask"
       Takes two parameters, a string representing an IRC mask and something
       to match	against	the IRC	mask, such as a	nick!user@hostname string.
       Returns a true value if they match, a false value otherwise.
       Optionally, one may pass	the casemapping	(see "uc_irc"),	as this
       function	uses "uc_irc" internally.

   "matches_mask_array"
       Takes two array references, the first being a list of strings
       representing IRC	masks, the second a list of somethings to test against
       the masks. Returns an empty hashref if there are	no matches. Otherwise,
       the keys	will be	the masks matched, each	value being an arrayref	of the
       strings that matched it.	 Optionally, one may pass the casemapping (see
       "uc_irc"), as this function uses	"uc_irc" internally.

   "unparse_mode_line"
       Takes one argument, a string representing a number of mode changes.
       Returns a condensed version of the changes.

	 my $mode_line = unparse_mode_line('+o+o+o-v+v');
	 $mode_line is now '+ooo-v+v'

   "gen_mode_change"
       Takes two arguments, strings representing a set of IRC user modes
       before and after	a change. Returns a string representing	what changed.

	 my $mode_change = gen_mode_change('abcde', 'befmZ');
	 $mode_change is now '-acd+fmZ'

   "parse_user"
       Takes one parameter, a string representing a user in the	form
       nick!user@hostname. In a	scalar context it returns just the nickname.
       In a list context it returns a list consisting of the nick, user	and
       hostname, respectively.

   "is_valid_chan_name"
       Takes one argument, a channel name to validate. Returns true or false
       if the channel name is valid or not. You	can supply a second argument,
       an array	of characters of allowed channel prefixes. Defaults to "['#',
       '&']".

   "is_valid_nick_name"
       Takes one argument, a nickname to validate. Returns true	or false if
       the nickname is valid or	not.

   "numeric_to_name"
       Takes an	IRC server numerical reply code	(e.g. '001') as	an argument,
       and returns the corresponding name (e.g.	'RPL_WELCOME').

   "name_to_numeric"
       Takes an	IRC server reply name (e.g. 'RPL_WELCOME') as an argument, and
       returns the corresponding numerical code	(e.g. '001').

   "has_color"
       Takes one parameter, a string of	IRC text. Returns true if it contains
       any IRC color codes, false otherwise. Useful if you want	your bot to
       kick users for (ab)using	colors.	:)

   "has_formatting"
       Takes one parameter, a string of	IRC text. Returns true if it contains
       any IRC formatting codes, false otherwise.

   "strip_color"
       Takes one parameter, a string of	IRC text. Returns the string stripped
       of all IRC color	codes.

   "strip_formatting"
       Takes one parameter, a string of	IRC text. Returns the string stripped
       of all IRC formatting codes.

   "decode_irc"
       This function takes a byte string (i.e. an unmodified IRC message) and
       returns a text string. Since the	source encoding	might have been	UTF-8,
       you should store	it with	UTF-8 or some other Unicode encoding in	your
       file/database/whatever to be safe. For a	more detailed discussion, see
       "ENCODING".

	use IRC::Utils qw(decode_irc);

	sub message_handler {
	    my ($nick, $channel, $message) = @_;

	    # not wise,	$message is a byte string of unkown encoding
	    print $message, "\n";

	    $message = decode_irc($what);

	    # good, $message is	a text string
	    print $message, "\n";
	}

CONSTANTS
       Use the following constants to add formatting and mIRC color codes to
       IRC messages.

       Normal text:

	NORMAL

       Formatting:

	BOLD
	UNDERLINE
	REVERSE
	ITALIC
	FIXED

       Colors:

	WHITE
	BLACK
	BLUE
	GREEN
	RED
	BROWN
	PURPLE
	ORANGE
	YELLOW
	LIGHT_GREEN
	TEAL
	LIGHT_CYAN
	LIGHT_BLUE
	PINK
	GREY
	LIGHT_GREY

       Individual non-color formatting codes can be cancelled with their
       corresponding constant, but you can also	cancel all of them at once
       with "NORMAL". To cancel	the effect of color codes, you must use
       "NORMAL".  which	of course has the side effect of cancelling all	other
       formatting codes	as well.

	$msg = 'This word is '.YELLOW.'yellow'.NORMAL.'	while this word	is'.BOLD.'bold'.BOLD;
	$msg = UNDERLINE.BOLD.'This sentence is	both underlined	and bold.'.NORMAL;

ENCODING
   Messages
       The only	encoding requirement the IRC protocol places on	its messages
       is that they be 8-bits and ASCII-compatible. This has resulted in most
       of the Western world settling on	ASCII-compatible Latin-1 (usually
       Microsoft's CP1252, a Latin-1 variant) as a convention. Recently,
       popular IRC clients (mIRC, xchat, certain irssi configurations) have
       begun sending a mixture of CP1252 and UTF-8 over	the wire to allow more
       characters without breaking backward compatibility (too much). They
       send CP1252 encoded messages if the characters fit within that
       encoding, otherwise falling back	to UTF-8, and likewise autodetecting
       the encoding (UTF-8 or CP1252) of incoming messages.  Since writing
       text with mixed encoding	to a file, terminal, or	database is not	a good
       idea, you need a	way to decode messages from IRC.  "decode_irc" will do
       that.

   Channel names
       The matter is complicated further by the	fact that some servers allow
       non-ASCII characters in channel names. IRC modules generally don't
       explicitly encode or decode any IRC traffic, but	they do	have to
       concatenate parts of a message (e.g. a channel name and a message)
       before sending it over the wire.	So when	you do something like
       "privmsg($channel, 'A|A<degree>i')", where $channel is the unmodified
       channel name (a byte string) you	got from an earlier IRC	message, the
       channel name will get double-encoded when concatenated with your
       message (a non-ASCII text string) if the	channel	name contains non-
       ASCII bytes.

       To prevent this,	you can't simply decode	the channel name and then use
       it. '#A|A<degree>i' in CP1252 is	not the	same channel as
       '#A|A<degree>i' in UTF-8, since they are	encoded	as different sequences
       of bytes, and the IRC server only cares about the byte representation.
       Therefore, when using a channel name you	got from the server (e.g. when
       replying	to message), you should	use the	original byte string (before
       it has been decoded with	"decode_irc"), and encode any other parameters
       (with "encode_utf8") so that your message will be concatenated
       correctly. At some point, you'll	probably want to print the channel
       name, write it to a log file or use it in a filename, so	you'll
       eventually have to decode it, at	which point the	UTF-8 "#A|A<degree>i"
       and CP1252 "#A|A<degree>i" will have to be considered equivalent.

	use Encode qw(encode_utf8 encode);

	sub message_handler {
	    # these three are all byte strings
	    my ($nick, $channel, $message) = @_;

	    # bad: if $channel has any non-ASCII bytes,	they will get double-encoded
	    privmsg($channel, 'A|A<degree>i');

	    # bad: if $message has any non-ASCII bytes,	they will get double-encoded
	    privmsg('#A|A<degree>i', $message);

	    # good: both are byte strings already, so they will	concatenate correctly
	    privmsg($channel, $message);

	    # good: both are text strings (Latin1 as per Perl's	default), so
	    # they'll be concatenated correctly
	    privmsg('#A|A<degree>i', 'A|A<degree>i');

	    # good: similar to the last	one, except now	they're	using UTF-8, which
	    # means that the channel is	actually not the same as above
	    use	utf8;
	    privmsg('#A|A<degree>i', 'A|A<degree>i');

	    # good: $channel and $msg_bytes are	both byte strings
	    my $msg_bytes = encode_utf8('A|A<degree>i');
	    privmsg($channel, $msg_bytes);

	    # good: $chan_bytes	and $message are both byte strings
	    # here we're sending a message to the utf8-encoded #A|A<degree>i
	    my $utf8_bytes = encode_utf8('#A|A<degree>i');
	    privmsg($utf8_bytes, $message);

	    # good: $chan_bytes	and $message are both byte strings
	    # here we're sending a message to the cp1252-encoded #A|A<degree>i
	    my $cp1252_bytes = encode('cp1252',	'#A|A<degree>i');
	    privmsg($cp1252_bytes, $message);

	    # bad: $channel is in an undetermined encoding
	    log_message("Got message from $channel");

	    # good: using the decoded version of $channel
	    log_message("Got message from ".decode_irc($channel));
	}

       See also	Encode,	perluniintro, perlunitut, perlunicode, and perlunifaq.

AUTHOR
       Hinrik Arn SigurA<degree>sson <hinrik.sig@gmail.com> ("Hinrik"
       irc.perl.org, or	"literal" @ FreeNode).

       Chris "BinGOs" Williams <chris@bingosnet.co.uk>

SEE ALSO
       POE::Component::IRC

       POE::Component::Server::IRC

perl v5.32.1			  2011-10-06			 IRC::Utils(3)

NAME | SYNOPSIS | DESCRIPTION | FUNCTIONS | CONSTANTS | ENCODING | AUTHOR | SEE ALSO

Want to link to this manual page? Use this URL:
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