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SSL_want(3), SSL_want_nothing(3), SSL_want_read(3), SSL_want_write(3), SSL_want_x509_lookup(3), SSL_want_async(3), SSL_want_async_job(3), SSL_want_client_hello_cb(3)
obtain state information TLS/SSL I/O operation
SSL_want(3), SSL_want_nothing(3), SSL_want_read(3), SSL_want_write(3), SSL_want_x509_lookup(3), SSL_want_async(3), SSL_want_async_job(3)
obtain state information TLS/SSL I/O operation
XmClipboardWithdrawFormat(3)
A clipboard function that indicates that the application no longer wants to supply a data item "XmClipboardWithdrawFormat" "clipboard functions" "XmClipboardWithdrawFormat"
clean(1)
automatically remove unwanted files
gmx-chi(1)
Calculate everything you want to know about chi and other dihedrals
libowfat_io_dontwantread(3), io_dontwantread(3)
signal that you do not want to read from a descriptor
libowfat_io_dontwantwrite(3), io_dontwantwrite(3)
signal that you do not want to write to a descriptor
libowfat_io_wantread(3), io_wantread(3)
signal that you want to read from a descriptor
libowfat_io_wantwrite(3), io_wantwrite(3)
signal that you want to write to a descriptor
mman(8)
(Advanced proxy server designed to increase privacy and remove unwanted content)
page_revoke(3)
Revocation methods There are two revocation method for PKIX/X.509: CRL and OCSP. Revocation is needed if the private key is lost and stolen. Depending on how picky you are, you might want to make revocation for destroyed private keys too (smartcard broken), but that should not be a problem. CRL is a list of certifiates that have expired. OCSP is an online checking method where the requestor sends a list of certificates to the OCSP server to return a signed reply if they are valid or not. Some services sends a OCSP reply as part of the hand-shake to make the revoktion decision simpler/faster for the client
pkg_trim(8)
select and remove unwanted leaf packages
wanted-ports(1)
-- depend on the ports that you want installed
xcb_map_request_event_t(3)
window wants to be mapped
Bio::DBLinkContainerI(3)
Abstract interface for any object wanting to use database cross references
CSS::Inliner::Parser(3)
Interface through which to read/write CSS files while respecting the cascade order NOTE: This sub-module very seriously focuses on respecting cascade order. As such this module is not for you if you want to modified a stylesheet once it's read. If you are looking for that functionality you may want to look at the sister module, CSS::Simple
DBIx::Class::DeploymentHandler::VersionStorage::Deprecated::VersionResultSet(3)
(DEPRECATED) Predefined searches to find what you want from the version storage
DBIx::Class::DeploymentHandler::VersionStorage::Standard::VersionResultSet(3)
Predefined searches to find what you want from the version storage
DBIx::Class::Helper::IgnoreWantarray(3)
(DEPRECATED) Get rid of search context issues
DBIx::Class::Helper::ResultSet::IgnoreWantarray(3)
Get rid of search context issues
DBIx::Class::Helper::ResultSet::OneRow(3)
The first you always wanted
Dist::Zilla::Util(3)
random snippets of code that Dist::Zilla wants
Gantry::Docs::Why(3), Header "Name" Gantry::Docs::Why(3)
What's a framework and why should I want one?
HTML::Display::Common(3)
routines common to all HTML::Display subclasses n .SS "_|_PACKAGE_|_->new %ARGS" .SS "_|_PACKAGE_|_->new %ARGS" Subsection "__PACKAGE__->new %ARGS" Creates a new object as a blessed hash. The passed arguments are stored within the hash. If you need to do other things in your constructor, remember to call this constructor as well : package HTML::Display::WhizBang; use parent HTML::Display::Common; sub new { my ($class) = shift; my %args = @_; my $self = $class->SUPER::new(%args); # do stuff $self; }; n .SS "$display->display %ARGS" .SS "$display->display %ARGS" Subsection "$display->display %ARGS" This is the routine used to display the HTML to the user. It takes the following parameters : html => SCALAR containing the HTML file => SCALAR containing the filename of the file to be displayed base => optional base url for the HTML, so that relative links still work location (synonymous to base) Basic usage : Subsection "Basic usage :" my $html = "<html><body><h1>Hello world!</h1></body></html>"; my $browser = HTML::Display->new(); $browser->display( html => $html ); Location parameter : Subsection "Location parameter :" If you fetch a page from a remote site but still want to display it to the user, the location parameter comes in very handy : my $html = <html><body><img src="/images/hp0.gif"></body></html>; my $browser = HTML::Display->new(); # This will display part of the Google logo $browser->display( html => $html, base => http://www.google.com );
HTML::Restrict(3)
Strip unwanted HTML tags and attributes
JSON::DWIW(3)
JSON converter that Does What I Want
MKDoc::XML::Stripper(3)
Remove unwanted XML / XHTML tags and attributes
MojoMojo::Schema::Result::WantedPage(3)
store pages that are wanted
Net::DNS::Check::NSQuery(3)
Class to query authoritative nameservers for the domain name you want to check
Perl::Critic::Policy::ValuesAndExpressions::RequireInterpolationOfMetachars(3)
Warns that you might have used single quotes when you really wanted double-quotes
Want(3)
A generalisation of "wantarray"
npm-config(7)
More than you probably want to know about npm configuration
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