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PKG_DELETE(1)		FreeBSD	General	Commands Manual		 PKG_DELETE(1)

NAME
     pkg_delete	-- a utility for deleting previously installed software	pack-
     age distributions

SYNOPSIS
     pkg_delete	[-dDfGinrvxX] [-p prefix] pkg-name ...
     pkg_delete	-a [flags]

DESCRIPTION
     The pkg_delete command is used to delete packages that have been previ-
     ously installed with the pkg_add(1) command.

WARNING
     Since the pkg_delete command may execute scripts or programs provided by
     a package file, your system may be	susceptible to ``trojan	horses'' or
     other subtle attacks from miscreants who create dangerous package files.

     You are advised to	verify the competence and identity of those who	pro-
     vide installable package files.  For extra	protection, examine all	the
     package control files in the package record directory
     (/var/db/pkg/_pkg-name_/).	 Pay particular	attention to any +INSTALL,
     +POST-INSTALL, +DEINSTALL,	+POST-DEINSTALL, +REQUIRE or +MTREE_DIRS
     files, and	inspect	the +CONTENTS file for @cwd, @mode (check for setuid),
     @dirrm, @exec, and	@unexec	directives, and/or use the pkg_info(1) command
     to	examine	the installed package control files.

OPTIONS
     The following command line	options	are supported:

     pkg-name ...
	     The named packages	are deinstalled.

     -a, --all
	     Unconditionally delete all	currently installed packages.

     -i, --interactive
	     Request confirmation before attempting to delete each package,
	     regardless	whether	or not the standard input device is a termi-
	     nal.

     -v, --verbose
	     Turn on verbose output.

     -D, --no-script, --no-scripts
	     If	a deinstallation script	exists for a given package, do not
	     execute it.

     -n, --dry-run
	     Do	not actually deinstall a package, just report the steps	that
	     would be taken if it were.

     -p, --prefix prefix
	     Set prefix	as the directory in which to delete files from any
	     installed packages	which do not explicitly	set theirs.  For most
	     packages, the prefix will be set automatically to the installed
	     location by pkg_add(1).

     -d, --clean-dirs
	     Remove empty directories created by file cleanup.	By default,
	     only files/directories explicitly listed in a package's contents
	     (either as	normal files/directories or with the @dirrm directive)
	     will be removed at	deinstallation time.  This option tells
	     pkg_delete	to also	remove any directories that were emptied as a
	     result of removing	the package.

     -f, --force
	     Force removal of the package, even	if a dependency	is recorded or
	     the deinstall or require script fails.

     -G, --no-glob
	     Do	not try	to expand shell	glob patterns in the pkg-name when
	     selecting packages	to be deleted (by default pkg_delete automati-
	     cally expands shell glob patterns in the pkg-name).

     -x, --regex
	     Treat the pkg-name	as a regular expression	and delete all pack-
	     ages whose	names match that regular expression.  Multiple regular
	     expressions could be provided, in that case pkg_delete deletes
	     all packages that match at	least one regular expression from the
	     list.

     -X, --extended
	     Like -x, but treats the pkg-name as an extended regular expres-
	     sion.

     -r, --recursive
	     Recursive removal.	 In addition to	specified packages, delete all
	     packages that depend on those packages as well.

TECHNICAL DETAILS
     The pkg_delete utility does pretty	much what it says.  It examines
     installed package records in /var/db/pkg/_pkg-name_, deletes the package
     contents, and finally removes the package records.	 If the	environment
     variable PKG_DBDIR	is set,	this overrides the /var/db/pkg/	path shown
     above.

     If	a package is required by other installed packages, pkg_delete will
     list those	dependent packages and refuse to delete	the package (unless
     the -f option is given).

     If	the package contains a require file (see pkg_create(1)), then this is
     executed first as
	   require _pkg-name_ DEINSTALL
     (where pkg-name is	the name of the	package	in question and	DEINSTALL is a
     keyword denoting that this	is a deinstallation) to	see whether or not
     deinstallation should continue.  A	non-zero exit status means no, unless
     the -f option is specified.

     If	a deinstall script exists for the package, it is executed before any
     files are removed.	 It is this script's responsibility to clean up	any
     additional	messy details around the package's installation, since all
     pkg_delete	knows how to do	is delete the files created in the original
     distribution.  The	deinstall script is called as:
	   script _pkg-name_ DEINSTALL
     where pkg-name is the name	of the package in question and DEINSTALL is a
     keyword denoting this as the pre-deinstallation phase.

     Note: The DEINSTALL keyword will not appear if separate scripts for dein-
     stall and post-deinstall are given	during package creation	time (using
     the -k and	-K flags to pkg_create(1)).

     If	a post-deinstall script	exists for the package,	it is executed after
     all files are removed.  It	is this	script's responsibility	to clean up
     any additional messy details around the package's installation, and leave
     the system	(hopefully) in the same	state that it was prior	to the instal-
     lation of the package.

     The post-deinstall	script is called as:
	   script _pkg-name_ POST-DEINSTALL
     where pkg-name is the name	of the package in question and POST-DEINSTALL
     is	a keyword denoting this	as the post-deinstallation phase.

     Note: The POST-DEINSTALL keyword will not appear if separate scripts for
     deinstall and post-deinstall are given during package creation time
     (using the	-k and -K flags	to pkg_create(1)).

     Reasoning behind passing keywords such as DEINSTALL and POST-DEINSTALL is
     that it lets you potentially write	only one program/script	that handles
     all aspects of installation and deletion.

     But experience has	proved that this is a lot more difficult to maintain
     and is not	as advantageous	as having separate scripts that	handle each
     aspect of installation and	deinstallation.

     All scripts are called with the environment variable PKG_PREFIX set to
     the installation prefix (see the -p option	above).	 This allows a package
     author to write a script that reliably performs some action on the	direc-
     tory where	the package is installed, even if the user might have changed
     it	by specifying the -p option when running pkg_delete or pkg_add.

ENVIRONMENT
     The environment variable PKG_DBDIR	specifies an alternative location for
     the installed package database.

FILES
     /var/db/pkg  Default location of the installed package database.

SEE ALSO
     pkg_add(1), pkg_create(1),	pkg_info(1), pkg_version(1), mktemp(3),
     mtree(8)

AUTHORS
     Jordan Hubbard

CONTRIBUTORS
     John Kohl <jtk@rational.com>, Oliver Eikemeier <eik@FreeBSD.org>

BUGS
     Sure to be	some.

FreeBSD	10.1			 May 30, 2008			  FreeBSD 10.1

NAME | SYNOPSIS | DESCRIPTION | WARNING | OPTIONS | TECHNICAL DETAILS | ENVIRONMENT | FILES | SEE ALSO | AUTHORS | CONTRIBUTORS | BUGS

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