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QwtPicker(3)
QwtPicker provides selections on a widget
QwtPickerClickPointMachine(3)
A state machine for point selections
QwtPickerClickRectMachine(3)
A state machine for rectangle selections
QwtPickerDragPointMachine(3)
A state machine for point selections
QwtPickerDragRectMachine(3)
A state machine for rectangle selections
QwtPickerMachine(3)
A state machine for QwtPicker selections
QwtPickerPolygonMachine(3)
A state machine for polygon selections
QwtPlotPicker(3)
QwtPlotPicker provides selections on a plot canvas
SoPickAction(3iv)
abstract base class for picking objects in a scene
SoPickStyle(3iv)
picking style node
SoPickedPoint(3iv)
represents point on surface of picked object
SoPickedPointList(3iv)
maintains a list of pointers to SoPickedPoint instances
SoRayPickAction(3iv)
intersects objects with a ray cast into scene
fbcolor(1)
interactively pick colors
git-cherry-pick(1)
Apply the changes introduced by some existing commits
git-rev-parse(1)
Pick out and massage parameters
gluPickMatrix(3), "gluPickMatrix(3)
define a picking region
matpick(nged)
Selects which matrix in the illuminated path should be edited
msgcache(8)
Cache client messages for later pickup by xymonfetch
nose(1gv)
test geomview's picking facility
page_revoke(3)
Revocation methods There are two revocation method for PKIX/X.509: CRL and OCSP. Revocation is needed if the private key is lost and stolen. Depending on how picky you are, you might want to make revocation for destroyed private keys too (smartcard broken), but that should not be a problem. CRL is a list of certifiates that have expired. OCSP is an online checking method where the requestor sends a list of certificates to the OCSP server to return a signed reply if they are valid or not. Some services sends a OCSP reply as part of the hand-shake to make the revoktion decision simpler/faster for the client
pick(1)
search for messages by content
picket_fence(nged)
Creates a BRL-CAD .g file containing picket fences
pickup(8)
Postfix local mail pickup
tcpick(8)
tcp stream sniffer and connection tracker
uupick(1)
retrieve files transferred by uuto
weblint(1)
pick fluff off web pages (HTML)
xwpick(1)
pick images from an X11-screen and store in files
xymongrep(1)
pick out lines in hosts.cfg
Astro::Catalog::IO::GaiaPick(3)
Catalogue reader for GAIA Pick Object files
Chart::Clicker::Drawing::ColorAllocator(3)
Color picker
Jifty::Web::Form::Field::Date(3)
Add date pickers to your forms
Jifty::Web::Form::Field::DateTime(3)
Add date pickers to your forms
Jifty::Web::Form::Field::Time(3)
Add time pickers to your forms
Lineup(3), XMLTV::Lineup(3)
Perl extension to read and write TV lineup information in XMLTV lineup format "write_data(data, options...)" 4 Item "write_data(data, options...)" Takes a data structure and writes it as XML to standard output. Any extra arguments are passed on to XML::Writer's constructor, for example my $f = new IO::File >out.xml; die if not $f; write_data($data, OUTPUT => $f); The encoding used for the output is given by the first element of the data. Normally, there will be a warning for any Perl data which is not understood and cannot be written as XMLTV, such as strange keys in hashes. But as an exception, any hash key beginning with an underscore will be skipped over silently. You can store 'internal use only' data this way. If a display name or channel hash contains a key beginning with 'debug', this key and its value will be written out as a comment inside the <display-name> or <channel> element. This lets you include small debugging messages in the XML output. "best_name(languages, pairs [, comparator])" 4 Item "best_name(languages, pairs [, comparator])" The XMLTV format contains many places where human-readable text is given an optional 'lang' attribute, to allow mixed languages. This is represented in Perl as a pair [ text, lang ], although the second element may be missing or undef if the language is unknown. When several alernatives for an element (such as <title>) can be given, the representation is a list of [ text, lang ] pairs. Given such a list, what is the best text to use? It depends on the user's preferred language. This function takes a list of acceptable languages and a list of [string, language] pairs, and finds the best one to use. This means first finding the appropriate language and then picking the 'best' string in that language. The best is normally defined as the first one found in a usable language, since the XMLTV format puts the most canonical versions first. But you can pass in your own comparison function, for example if you want to choose the shortest piece of text that is in an acceptable language. The acceptable languages should be a reference to a list of language codes looking like 'ru', or like 'de_DE'. The text pairs should be a reference to a list of pairs [ string, language ]. (As a special case if this list is empty or undef, that means no text is present, and the result is undef.) The third argument if present should be a cmp-style function that compares two strings of text and returns 1 if the first argument is better, -1 if the second better, 0 if they're equally good. Returns: [s, l] pair, where s is the best of the strings to use and l is its language. This pair is 'live' - it is one of those from the list passed in. So you can use best_name() to find the best pair from a list and then modify the content of that pair. (This routine depends on the Lingua::Preferred module being installed; if that module is missing then the first available language is always chosen.) Example: my $langs = [ de, fr ]; # German or French, please # Say we found the following under $ch->{display-name} for a channel $ch. my $pairs = [ [ BBC Trois, fr ], [ BBC One, en_US ] ]; my $best = best_name($langs, $pairs); print "chose title $best->[0]en"; "list_display_name_keys(), list_channel_keys()" 4 Item "list_display_name_keys(), list_channel_keys()" Some users of this module may wish to enquire at runtime about which keys a programme or channel hash can contain. The data in the hash comes from the attributes and subelements of the corresponding element in the XML. The values of attributes are simply stored as strings, while subelements are processed with a handler which may return a complex data structure. These subroutines returns a hash mapping key to handler name and multiplicity. This lets you know what data types can be expected under each key. For keys which come from attributes rather than subelements, the handler is set to 'scalar', just as for subelements which give a simple string. "scalar" 4 Item "scalar" Reads and writes a simple string as the content of the XML element. "icon" 4 Item "icon" An icon in XMLTV files is like the <img> element in HTML. It is represented in Perl as a hashref with 'src' and optionally 'width' and 'height' keys. "with-lang" 4 Item "with-lang" In XML something like title can be either <title>Foo</title> or <title lang=en>Foo</title>. In Perl these are stored as [ 'Foo' ] and [ 'Foo', 'en' ]. For the former [ 'Foo', undef ] would also be okay. This handler also has two modifiers which may be added to the name after '/'. /e means that empty text is allowed, and will be returned as the empty tuple [], to mean that the element is present but has no text. When writing with /e, undef will also be understood as present-but-empty. You cannot however specify a language if the text is empty. The modifier /m means that the text is allowed to span multiple lines. So for example with-lang/em is a handler for text with language, where the text may be empty and may contain newlines. Note that the with-lang-or-empty of earlier releases has been replaced by with-lang/e. Now, which handlers are used for which subelements (keys) of display names and channels? And what is the multiplicity (should you expect a single value or a list of values)? The following tables map subelements of <display-name> and of <channel> to the handlers used to read and write them. Many elements have their own handler with the same name, and most of the others use with-lang. The third column specifies the multiplicity of the element: * (any number) will give a list of values in Perl, + (one or more) will give a nonempty list, ? (maybe one) will give a scalar, and 1 (exactly one) will give a scalar which is not undef
YAML::Any(3)
Pick a YAML implementation and use it
sechash(3), md4(3), md5(3), sha1(3), hmac_md5(3), hmac_sha1(3), md5pickle(3), md5unpickle(3), sha1pickle(3), sha1unpickle(3)
cryptographically secure hashes
wxColourPickerCtrl(3)
See external documentation: wxColourPickerCtrl
wxColourPickerEvent(3)
See external documentation: wxColourPickerEvent
wxDatePickerCtrl(3)
See external documentation: wxDatePickerCtrl
wxDirPickerCtrl(3)
See external documentation: wxDirPickerCtrl
wxFileDirPickerEvent(3)
See external documentation: wxFileDirPickerEvent
wxFilePickerCtrl(3)
See external documentation: wxFilePickerCtrl
wxFontPickerCtrl(3)
See external documentation: wxFontPickerCtrl
wxFontPickerEvent(3)
See external documentation: wxFontPickerEvent
wxPickerBase(3)
See external documentation: wxPickerBase
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